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What (if any) is a good way of handling the ABI inconsistency between libc++ and stdlibc++ on Mac?

The problem: Many c++11 features require the new libc++ implementation of the C++ standard library. But libc++ is not ABI-compatible with the old libstdc++, while currently most software typically links against the latter. For example the system compiler still uses stdlibc++ which means that all my libraries installed with macports have a different ABI for std-classes like string and are unlinkable with projects that make heavy use of c++11.

My current hack-of-a-solution: Keep two versions of libraries where this commonly leads to an issue (boost, opencv etc.) and link to the appropriate one.

I guess that one might suggest that if I really want to make use of libc++ I should purge my system of anything using stdlibc++, and make sure that anything from macports (or anywhere else) only links with libc++. You could see how daunting this task seems.

Has anyone worked out a nice way of relating to this "between-stdlib-limbo" that we are living in? :)

EDIT: I'm making an implied follow-up question more explicit: Apple ships both libc++ and libstdc++ with their systems. Assuming one attacks the underlying problem and tries to make a switch to libc++-only. What would be the recommended way of switching from libstdc++ to libc++ given that 100% of the libraries currently installed on your system (some shipped with the system, most of them via macports, a few via manual compilation) are linked to libstdc++ (if any)? Has anyone done this and survived?

  • 1
    All code linked together should use the same standard library implementation and version. Everything else is called incompatible and was never intended to work. – PlasmaHH Jul 3 '13 at 14:19
  • Yes off course. This is the whole problem - that we simultaneously have two incompatible standard library implementations in circulation. My question is about what strategies people have adopted to deal with this issue. – kamjagin Jul 3 '13 at 14:23
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    That is the strategy. There are many more standard library implementations, and they are incompatible with each others, and they will stay that way forever. – PlasmaHH Jul 3 '13 at 14:55
13

Barring 'hidden' uses of standard library types it is perfectly safe to mix libc++ and libstdc++ in a single program, where some TUs (or libraries, or modules) use libc++ and some use libstdc++. As long as the interfaces between TUs do not use the incompatible types there shouldn't be any problems.

libc++ uses inline namespaces to help ensure that ABI incompatible types cannot be mistaken for one another; if an interface uses libc++ std::string directly a library expecting libstdc++ std::string will not link to the interface, because the actual symbols are different: std::string vs. std::__1::string.

libc++ also ensures that low level features like exceptions and dynamic memory allocation are ABI compatible (assuming you build libstdc++ and libc++ using the same abi library), so it's safe to deallocate memory in a TU that uses, say, libc++ when the memory was allocated in a TU using libstdc++, or to throw an exception from code build on libc++ and catch it in code using libstdc++.

There can be a problem when types in interfaces hide standard library types; given an interface using struct S { std::string s; }; the definition of the type S will be different depending on what the TU thinks std::string is, thus violating the one definition rule.


However it sounds as if your real problem is with libraries that do use standard library types in interfaces.

I guess that one might suggest that if I really want to make use of libc++ I should purge my system of anything using stdlibc++, and make sure that anything from macports (or anywhere else) only links with libc++. You could see how daunting this task seems.

You only need to ensure that TUs that use the standard library in interfaces use libc++. You do not need to completely purge libstdc++. Libraries that don't use the standard library in their interface can still go on linking with libstdc++.

EDIT: I'm making an implied follow-up question more explicit: Apple ships both libc++ and libstdc++ with their systems. Assuming one attacks the underlying problem and tries to make a switch to libc++-only. What would be the recommended way of switching from libstdc++ to libc++ given that 100% of the libraries currently installed on your system (some shipped with the system, most of them via macports, a few via manual compilation) are linked to libstdc++ (if any)? Has anyone done this and survived?

Remember, it only matters when the standard library is being used in interfaces. Hopefully such libraries are already switching to libc++ on their own when they build for OS X. If not, perhaps they'll accept patches to do so.

Building your own binaries using the appropriate library is not a 'hack'; it is the correct thing to do absent the upstream project doing it for you. If you consistently use libc++ in your own code then you will not need to build multiple versions of any library; only libc++ versions.


reference for abi compatibility of libc++: http://lists.cs.uiuc.edu/pipermail/cfe-dev/2012-September/024594.html

  • Thanks - you are completely right that I overestimated the problems with the switch from libstdc++ to libc++. Given that the revered boost (filesystem) was one of the culprits I assumed that many established libraries also use the standard library in their interfaces, which doesn't seem to be the case (besides many of them being c-only)). – kamjagin Jul 4 '13 at 8:36
  • "Hopefully such libraries are already switching to libc++ on their own when they build for OS X. If not, perhaps they'll accept patches to do so." I doubt that will happen before Apple switches the compiler default for the C++ std library option in Xcode from libstdc++ to libc++, because then those libaries would introduce the very same problem with the default std lib that they fix for a non-default one. – Kaiserludi Apr 14 '15 at 14:50
  • I see only two options here for 3rd party library providers: - offer all binaries in two flavors, one built against libstdc++, the other one against libc++ - get rid of all stdlib usage in their API (which would be a breaking API change) – Kaiserludi Apr 14 '15 at 14:52
  • @Kaiserludi The default for xcode projects has been libc++ for a while now. – bames53 Apr 14 '15 at 16:20
  • The templates for new projects set the project settings to explicitly override that default to use libc++ since Xcode 4.5, but the compiler default is still libstdc++, even with Xcode 6.3, to not break existing projects. – Kaiserludi Apr 14 '15 at 17:31
1

You're not going to like this.

You simply can't have an ABI that uses types whose definitions change on different systems. That's what you're doing when you have an ABI that uses std::string (for example) and then compile that using different compilers or on different platforms.

In fixing this, my preferred approach -- if possible -- would be to eliminate all the compiler-specific stuff from the ABI and replace it with either native types, or types defined by your library. Those library-defined types must, in turn, only expose non-compiler stuff in the ABI.

Sometimes you can get by with a simple replacement. Other times you need to take more drastic steps. One approach might be to provide a kind of bridge or wrapper class around things like std::string. Maybe something like this:

class MyString
{
public:
  virtual const char* c_str() const = 0;
  static MyString* Make();
  virtual MyString* Clone() const = 0;
protected:
  MyString();
};

And in the library itself:

class MyStringImpl
:
  public MyString
{
public:
  const char* c_str() const
  { 
    return mStr.c_str();
  }

  MyString* Clone() const
  {
    return new MyStringImpl (*this);
  }

  MyStringImpl ()
  {
  }

  MyStringImple (const MyString& rhs)
  :
    mStr (rhs.c_str())
  {
  }
private:
  std::string mStr;
};

MyString* MyString::Make()
{
  return new MyStringImpl;
}

Gross. Possibly inefficient. Lots of code to write. But this is the corner you've painted yourself in to.

  • "would be to eliminate all the compiler-specific stuff from the ABI and replace it with either native types" note that even the sizes of things like int and long will vary among compilers, as well as the actual layout of even PODs. – PlasmaHH Jul 3 '13 at 15:22
  • @PlasmaHH: Fair point. In practice I would use fixed-size types, such as uint32_t etc. – John Dibling Jul 3 '13 at 15:23
  • Coming from the *nix-side I am a bit spoiled having had the same compiler ABI since 2004 (for gcc that is) and other compilers (such as intel's and oracle's typically provide gnu-abi modes), while MSVC breaks its ABI every other year forcing developer to explore COM-heaven :). Even so I thought that PODs are laid out linearly in memory and have zero initial padding. Is the ABI-incompatibility of PODs coming from undefined between-member-padding then or is there some additional point that is loosely defined (or un-)? – kamjagin Jul 4 '13 at 8:49
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    @kamjagin: actually MSVC breaks the ABI not to force you to use COM, but to force you NOT to rely on implementation details. The approach taken bei GCC may seem reasonable, but there is one inherent flaw: the GCC project does NOT control the standard and therefor can't guarantee that their ABI won't be invalidated by a new standard (e.g. the std::list::size requirements have changed in C++11) – MFH Jul 4 '13 at 9:32

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