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As CodeReview does not allow snippet-comparison, I'm asking my question here. I apologize if this is not conform regarding SO-rules but I have no means available to test or benchmark the question I have.

Here goes... I currently have following working code:

string currentValue, valueToFind;

for (int i = 1; i <= rows; i++)
{
    currentValue = source.CellValueString(i, 1);

    for (int j = 2; j <= localRows; j++)
    {
        valueToFind = target.CellValueString(j, 4);

        if (valueToFind == currentValue)
        {
            //Set Excel cell value
            break;
        }
    }
}

Note that rows and localRows normally have a value around 300, so that means a maximum of 90.000 iterations. source and target are instances of a custom class for working with Excel objects. The method CellValueString() is just for getting the string-value of a cell. I was thinking that maybe following code might be more performant:

//GetValues() would be a method to get the values of the given range
string[] values = source.GetValues("A1:A" + rows);
string[] valuesToCompare = target.GetValues("D2:D" + localRows);

foreach(string currentValue in values)
{
    foreach(string valueToFind in valuesToCompare)
    {
        if(valueToFind == currentValue)
        {
            //Set Excel cell value
            break;
        }
    }
}

Is this second approach, when getting all values at once, faster than iterating and on each iteration get the value from Excel to compare?

Any other ways to increase performance are welcome!

  • 1
    You have no way to execute your code? I'd suggest just putting a Stopwatch at the beginning and outputting the elapsed time at the end to compare the results. – Kim Jul 3 '13 at 15:03
  • Stopwatch is not an option. This is code that is being executed behind an InfoPath Form. – Abbas Jul 3 '13 at 15:24
1

You can measure the performance of your code by adding the following (sorry I only do VBA, but the principle should be useable in VC as well):

[A1] = Now()

' your code goes here

[A2] = Now()

This records the system time before and after the code block under test into cells A1 and A2 of the current worksheet. On top of that, in [A3] you enter formula =(A2-A1)*86400 to display the time difference in seconds (including decimal places).

With that at hand, my experience is that mass operations on ranges (i.e. For Each x In y) tend to be (much) faster than discrete loops.

  • What do you mean with your last sentence? Getting the values in mass (through Range) is faster than getting a single cell-value each iteration? – Abbas Jul 3 '13 at 15:23
  • 1
    making use of Excel's collection objects and foreach is usually faster than walking through cells with generic for/while/loop constructs .... e.g. according to my experience your 2nd would be faster than your 1st – MikeD Jul 4 '13 at 13:29
  • I used the tip of Kim (comment) to analyze the time of execution and working with a Range in memory is indeed a lot faster than looping for single cell values. – Abbas Jul 9 '13 at 8:55

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