30

Why doesn't this work?


$drvrInstFilePath = "$sharePath\$imageName\ISO`$OEM$`$1\RPKTools\RPKDriverInst.bat"
echo $drvrInstFilePath
$drvrInstContent = Get-Content -LiteralPath "$sharePath\$imageName\ISO`$OEM$`$1\RPKTools\RPKDriverInst.bat"  | Out-String

The echo shows the right path, but the Get-Content command expands the $oem and $1 to blank strings, even though they are escaped. Why?

  • What output do you get when you run the above script? I can't replicate you problem. Also what version of powershell are you using? – Castrohenge Jul 3 '13 at 19:22
  • PS 2.0. And I couldn't duplicate it either just now, so I must have been going crazy. – Belac Jul 3 '13 at 19:29
66

Instead of messing around with escaping dollar signs, use single quotes ' instead of double quotes ". It prevents PowerShell expanding $ into a variable. Like so,

$p = "C:\temp\Share\ISO$OEM$"
# Output
C:\temp\Share\ISO$


$p = 'C:\temp\Share\ISO$OEM$'
# Output
C:\temp\Share\ISO$OEM$

If you need to create a path by using variables, consider using Join-Path. Like so,

$s = "share"
join-path "C:\temp\$share" 'Share\ISO$OEM$'
# Output
C:\temp\Share\ISO$OEM$
|improve this answer|||||
  • 1
    Thanks, join-path got me to where I was going. – Belac Jul 3 '13 at 19:22
  • 1
    in the last example, what's the point of defining $s = share if the next line uses $share that is obviously empty? (as seen in the output, where it's temp\Share, capital S, coming from the 2nd parameter of join-path ) – quetzalcoatl Aug 29 '17 at 22:55
  • @quetzalcoatl I think the first line was meant to say $share = "" – NH. Sep 22 '17 at 19:28
13

You used double quotes with a single backtick. This is an incorrect combination. In fact, I am not sure that a single backtick alone is sufficient in any case. Your successful options to escape the dollar sign ($) in PowerShell are to use double quotes with a backslash-backtick combination ("\`$find"), or instead to use single quotes with a simple backslash ('\$find'). [However, note the exception at the end about function call parameters.] See below for examples.

Also, for those unfamiliar with the distinction, it is important not to confuse the backtick character (`) with the single-quotation character (') in these escapes.

[SUCCESS] Double quotes as container with backslash-backtick as escape:

PS C:\Temp> 'What is $old?' | ForEach-Object {$_ -replace "\`$old", "(New)"}
What is (New)?
PS C:\Temp>

[FAIL] Double quotes as container with backslash-apostrophe as escape:

PS C:\Temp> 'What is $old?' | ForEach-Object {$_ -replace "\'$old", "(New)"}
What is $old?
PS C:\Temp>

[SUCCESS] Single quotes as container with simple backslash as escape:

PS C:\Temp> 'What is $old?' | ForEach-Object {$_ -replace '\$old', "(New)"}
What is (New)?
PS C:\Temp>

[FAIL] Single quotes as container with backslash-backtick as escape:

PS C:\Temp> 'What is $old?' | ForEach-Object {$_ -replace '\`$old', "(New)"}
What is $old?
PS C:\Temp>

Overall, the easiest option may be to use single quotes as the container and a single backslash as the escape: '\$old'

Update: As if the above were not confusing enough, when you use a function call instead of a command, single quotes are needed without an escape. Trying to use an escape on the function call parameter will not work:

[FAIL] Using an escape in a function parameter:

PS C:\Temp> 'What is $old?' | ForEach-Object {$_.ToString().Replace('\$old', "(New)");}
What is $old?
PS C:\Temp>

[SUCCESS] Using plain single quotes without an escape in a function parameter:

PS C:\Temp> 'What is $old?' | ForEach-Object {$_.ToString().Replace('$old', "(New)");}
What is (New)?
PS C:\Temp>
|improve this answer|||||
  • 2
    additionally, if in a function-call you used "-quotes, $old performs string interpolation and you have to escape it by .. single backtick.with no backslash. It actually makes sense, since backslash is an additional escaping in non-funcall syntax.. anyways, I found it out when I tried to funcall a Regex.Replace with both string interpolation and capture group substitution: $regex.Replace($rawtext, "$keyword: `$1"). Without the backtick, the $1 would be string-interpolated before passing to Replace and would always yield empty text there, since there was no such variable. – quetzalcoatl Aug 29 '17 at 23:06
  • 1
    I don't think "double quotes with a backslash-backtick combination" ("`$find") is working in PowerShell 5.0 anymore... According to Windows PowerShell Language Specification Version 3.0 page 30, a single backtick is enough. – Jing He Jul 18 '19 at 14:21
  • 2
    Because the -Replace operator uses regular expressions, the examples are unfortunately confusing the normal PowerShell escaping using backtick with regular expression escapes which use backslash. Plain PowerShell strings do not use backslash for escaping. – John Rees Aug 16 '19 at 4:48
0

In my case I needed to escape some $'s used in a string but not others that are variables.

For example, my SSRS instance name has a $ sign:

[ReportServer$SSRS]

To escape the $ sign I use single quotes. Otherwise I use the -join statement to concatenate variables with the strings containing actual $ signs.

 $sql = -join('ALTER DATABASE [ReportServer$', $instanceName,'TempDB]
  SET SINGLE_USER WITH ROLLBACK IMMEDIATE;
  GO

  USE [master]
  RESTORE DATABASE [ReportServer$', $instanceName,'TempDB] FROM  DISK = N''C:\temp\ReportServerTempDB.BAK'' WITH  FILE = 1,
    MOVE N''ReportServerTempDB'' TO N''', $sqlDataDrive + "\data_" + $instanceName, '\ReportServer$', $instanceName,'TempDB.mdf'', 
    MOVE N''ReportServerTempDB_log'' TO N''', $sqlLogDrive + "\log_" + $instanceName, '\ReportServer$', $instanceName,'_TempDBlog.LDF'',  NOUNLOAD,  REPLACE, RECOVERY,  STATS = 5
  GO

  ALTER DATABASE [ReportServer$', $instanceName,'TempDB]
  SET MULTI_USER;
  GO
  ')
|improve this answer|||||

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