23

I recently inherited a database on which one of the tables has the primary key composed of encoded values (Part1*1000 + Part2).
I normalized that column, but I cannot change the old values. So now I have

select ID from table order by ID
ID
100001
100002
101001
...

I want to find the "holes" in the table (more precisely, the first "hole" after 100000) for new rows.
I'm using the following select, but is there a better way to do that?

select /* top 1 */ ID+1 as newID from table
where ID > 100000 and
ID + 1 not in (select ID from table)
order by ID

newID
100003
101029
...

The database is Microsoft SQL Server 2000. I'm ok with using SQL extensions.

2
  • Just out of curiosity, what is the motivation for finding these "holes"? Is this an intelligent key? Oct 6, 2008 at 15:32
  • The database is for the access control system at my work. In the old database Part1 was a Company code and Part2 was an Employee code. If a person switched companies he'd have to be issued a new card. The card reading system needs 6 digits, so new cards start at 100000, excluding existing ones.
    – pmg
    Oct 6, 2008 at 15:57

11 Answers 11

21
select ID +1 From Table t1
where not exists (select * from Table t2 where t1.id +1 = t2.id);

not sure if this version would be faster than the one you mentioned originally.

4
  • 1
    I like the looks of your version. I'll check the Execution Plan tomorrow morning and let you know.
    – pmg
    Oct 6, 2008 at 21:25
  • 1
    I don't know about your data, but on my similar table (25,000 entries, the first hole is at the 3,000 mark or so), the left join version took about a second of clock time, this one ran so long I killed it after 2 minutes. Oct 6, 2008 at 22:55
  • 1
    My real-data table has 17500 records and LOTS of holes. My select and IronGoofy's perform exactly the same; Santiago's version is a little slower -- but all 3, on my system, return the holes in a blink of an eye.
    – pmg
    Oct 7, 2008 at 8:19
  • 2
    Ah, the reason it didn't work for me is that I didn't have a unique index on the column I was trying to find the hole in. Jan 1, 2009 at 2:19
16
SELECT (ID+1) FROM table AS t1
LEFT JOIN table as t2
ON t1.ID+1 = t2.ID
WHERE t2.ID IS NULL
7
  • 2
    This works. Thank you Santiago. Query Analyser, in the Execution Plan, says the subselect version is better because it uses a Merge Join rather than a Hash Match.
    – pmg
    Oct 6, 2008 at 16:09
  • 1
    Yes, it's always better to avoid subqueries if possible. Glad it help! Oct 6, 2008 at 16:15
  • 2
    This didn't work for me in PostgreSQL, possibly because of the way selecting "id+1" works in it, or possibly because it's not a primary key on mine. Jan 1, 2009 at 2:30
  • 1
    I know this is over 4 years old, but I happened to have a need for this same operation and this question was one of the top Google results. However, this answer does not work -- it gives the wrong values, not to mention the ambiguous column-name syntax error if you don't alias the 'ID' in the SELECT clause. The JOIN-ON condition needs to be changed to "ON t1.ID + 1 = t2.ID", or "ON t1.ID = t2.ID - 1".
    – NateJ
    May 1, 2013 at 21:18
  • 1
    Thanks NateJ, I have fixed the join condition; if you can post the other corrections I'll be glad to edit the answer. May 2, 2013 at 19:03
12

This solution should give you the first and last ID values of the "holes" you are seeking. I use this in Firebird 1.5 on a table of 500K records, and although it does take a little while, it gives me what I want.

SELECT l.id + 1 start_id, MIN(fr.id) - 1 stop_id
FROM (table l
LEFT JOIN table r
ON l.id = r.id - 1)
LEFT JOIN table fr
ON l.id < fr.id
WHERE r.id IS NULL AND fr.id IS NOT NULL
GROUP BY l.id, r.id

For example, if your data looks like this:

ID
1001
1002
1005
1006
1007
1009
1011

You would receive this:

start_id   stop_id
1003       1004
1008       1008
1010       1010

I wish I could take full credit for this solution, but I found it at Xaprb.

2
  • Took a little while to run on a large table over a slow connection with SQL2005, but the wait was well worth it! May 15, 2009 at 9:22
  • Works on Postgres. Replace table for the name of your table. Jan 21, 2021 at 18:07
2

from How do I find a "gap" in running counter with SQL?

select
    MIN(ID)
from (
    select
        100001 ID
    union all
    select
        [YourIdColumn]+1
    from
        [YourTable]
    where
        --Filter the rest of your key--
    ) foo
left join
    [YourTable]
    on [YourIdColumn]=ID
    and --Filter the rest of your key--
where
    [YourIdColumn] is null
2

The best way is building a temp table with all IDs

Than make a left join.

declare @maxId int
select @maxId = max(YOUR_COLUMN_ID) from YOUR_TABLE_HERE


declare @t table (id int)

declare @i int
set @i = 1

while @i <= @maxId
begin
    insert into @t values (@i)
    set @i = @i +1
end

select t.id
from @t t
left join YOUR_TABLE_HERE x on x.YOUR_COLUMN_ID = t.id
where x.YOUR_COLUMN_ID is null
2

Have thought about this question recently, and looks like this is the most elegant way to do that:

SELECT TOP(@MaxNumber) ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY t1.number) 
FROM master..spt_values t1 CROSS JOIN master..spt_values t2 
EXCEPT
SELECT Id FROM <your_table>
2

This solution doesn't give all holes in table, only next free ones + first available max number on table - works if you want to fill in gaps in id-es, + get free id number if you don't have a gap..

select numb + 1 from temp
minus
select numb from temp;
1

This will give you the complete picture, where 'Bottom' stands for gap start and 'Top' stands for gap end:

    select *
    from 
    ( 
       (select <COL>+1 as id, 'Bottom' AS 'Pos' from <TABLENAME> /*where <CONDITION*/>
       except
       select <COL>, 'Bottom' AS 'Pos' from <TABLENAME> /*where <CONDITION>*/)
    union
       (select <COL>-1 as id, 'Top' AS 'Pos' from <TABLENAME> /*where <CONDITION>*/
       except
       select <COL>, 'Top' AS 'Pos' from <TABLENAME> /*where <CONDITION>*/)
    ) t
    order by t.id, t.Pos

Note: First and Last results are WRONG and should not be regarded, but taking them out would make this query a lot more complicated, so this will do for now.

1

Many of the previous answer are quite good. However they all miss to return the first value of the sequence and/or miss to consider the lower limit 100000. They all returns intermediate holes but not the very first one (100001 if missing).

A full solution to the question is the following one:

select id + 1 as newid from
    (select 100000 as id union select id from tbl) t
    where (id + 1 not in (select id from tbl)) and
          (id >= 100000)
    order by id
    limit 1;

The number 100000 is to be used if the first number of the sequence is 100001 (as in the original question); otherwise it is to be modified accordingly "limit 1" is used in order to have just the first available number instead of the full sequence

1

For people using Oracle, the following can be used:

select a, b from (
  select ID + 1 a, max(ID) over (order by ID rows between current row and 1 following) - 1 b from MY_TABLE
) where a <= b order by a desc;
1

The following SQL code works well with SqLite, but should be used without issues also on MySQL, MS SQL and so on.

On SqLite this takes only 2 seconds on a table with 1 million rows (and about 100 spared missing rows)

WITH holes AS (
 SELECT 
 IIF(c2.id IS NULL,c1.id+1,null) as start,
 IIF(c3.id IS NULL,c1.id-1,null) AS stop,
 ROW_NUMBER () OVER (
  ORDER BY c1.id ASC
 ) AS rowNum
 FROM |mytable| AS c1
 LEFT JOIN |mytable| AS c2 ON c1.id+1 = c2.id
 LEFT JOIN |mytable| AS c3 ON c1.id-1 = c3.id
 WHERE c2.id IS NULL OR c3.id IS NULL
)
SELECT h1.start AS start, h2.stop AS stop FROM holes AS h1
LEFT JOIN holes AS h2 ON h1.rowNum+1 = h2.rowNum
WHERE h1.start IS NOT NULL AND h2.stop IS NOT NULL
UNION ALL                
SELECT 1 AS start, h1.stop AS stop FROM holes AS h1
WHERE h1.rowNum = 1 AND h1.stop > 0
ORDER BY h1.start ASC

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