What are differences between segment trees, interval trees, binary indexed trees and range trees in terms of:

  • Key idea/definition
  • Applications
  • Performance/order in higher dimensions/space consumption

Please do not just give definitions.

  • 11
    It is not a duplicate, That question is if fenwick trees is generalization of interval tress, and my question is more specific and different. – Aditya Jul 4 '13 at 9:08
  • 6
    It has not been answered at stackoverflow.com/questions/2795989/…, the answer there just gives definition. – Aditya Jul 4 '13 at 9:10
  • 11
    How is it too broad? "What are some differences between x and y?" is as clear and focused as it gets. This is a very good question. – IVlad Jul 4 '13 at 9:29
  • 13
    And there is no good answer for this available anywhere. A good answer will be great for the community – Aditya Jul 4 '13 at 9:30
  • 20
    Most of these data structures (except Fenwick trees) are reviewed in this pdf: "Interval, Segment, Range, and Priority Search Trees" (by D. T. Lee). Or you can read it as a chapter from this book: "Handbook of Data Structures and Applications". – Evgeny Kluev Jul 4 '13 at 10:18
up vote 261 down vote accepted
+25

All these data structures are used for solving different problems:

  • Segment tree stores intervals, and optimized for "which of these intervals contains a given point" queries.
  • Interval tree stores intervals as well, but optimized for "which of these intervals overlap with a given interval" queries. It can also be used for point queries - similar to segment tree.
  • Range tree stores points, and optimized for "which points fall within a given interval" queries.
  • Binary indexed tree stores items-count per index, and optimized for "how many items are there between index m and n" queries.

Performance / Space consumption for one dimension:

  • Segment tree - O(n logn) preprocessing time, O(k+logn) query time, O(n logn) space
  • Interval tree - O(n logn) preprocessing time, O(k+logn) query time, O(n) space
  • Range tree - O(n logn) preprocessing time, O(k+logn) query time, O(n) space
  • Binary Indexed tree - O(n logn) preprocessing time, O(logn) query time, O(n) space

(k is the number of reported results).

All data structures can be dynamic, in the sense that the usage scenario includes both data changes and queries:

  • Segment tree - interval can be added/deleted in O(logn) time (see here)
  • Interval tree - interval can be added/deleted in O(logn) time
  • Range tree - new points can be added/deleted in O(logn) time (see here)
  • Binary Indexed tree - the items-count per index can be increased in O(logn) time

Higher dimensions (d>1):

  • Segment tree - O(n(logn)^d) preprocessing time, O(k+(logn)^d) query time, O(n(logn)^(d-1)) space
  • Interval tree - O(n logn) preprocessing time, O(k+(logn)^d) query time, O(n logn) space
  • Range tree - O(n(logn)^d) preprocessing time, O(k+(logn)^d) query time, O(n(logn)^(d-1))) space
  • Binary Indexed tree - O(n(logn)^d) preprocessing time, O((logn)^d) query time, O(n(logn)^d) space
  • 11
    I really get the impression that segment trees < interval trees from this. Is there any reason to prefer a segment tree? E.g. implementation simplicity? – j_random_hacker Jul 24 '13 at 21:36
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    @j_random_hacker: Segment trees based algorithms have advantages in certain more complex high-dimensional variants of the intervals query. For example, finding which non-axis-parallel line-segments intersect with a 2D window. – Lior Kogan Jul 25 '13 at 16:39
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    Thanks, I'd be interested in any elaboration you could give on that. – j_random_hacker Jul 25 '13 at 23:17
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    @j_random_hacker, segment trees have another interesting use: RMQs (range minimum queries) in O(log N) time where N is the overall interval size. – ars-longa-vita-brevis Feb 26 '14 at 6:48
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    @j_random_hacker: See for example cs.yazd.ac.ir/farshi/Teaching/CG3921/Slides/… – Lior Kogan Jun 19 at 9:51

Not that I can add anything to Lior's answer, but it seems like it could do with a good table.

One Dimension

k is the number of reported results

|              | Segment       | Interval   | Range          | Indexed   |
|--------------|--------------:|-----------:|---------------:|----------:|
|Preprocessing |        n logn |     n logn |         n logn |    n logn |
|Query         |        k+logn |     k+logn |         k+logn |      logn |
|Space         |        n logn |          n |              n |         n |
|              |               |            |                |           |
|Insert/Delete |          logn |       logn |           logn |      logn |

Higher Dimensions

d > 1

|              | Segment       | Interval   | Range          | Indexed   |
|--------------|--------------:|-----------:|---------------:|----------:|
|Preprocessing |     n(logn)^d |     n logn |      n(logn)^d | n(logn)^d |
|Query         |    k+(logn)^d | k+(logn)^d |     k+(logn)^d |  (logn)^d |
|Space         | n(logn)^(d-1) |     n logn | n(logn)^(d-1)) | n(logn)^d |

These tables are created in Github Formatted Markdown - see Gist if you want the images.

  • 2
    What do you mean by reported results ? – Pratik Singhal Feb 1 '16 at 12:23
  • @ps06756 search algorithms often have a runtime of log(n) where n is the inputsize but can yield results that are linear in n which can't be done in logarithmic time (outputting n numbers in log(n) time is not possible). – oerpli Aug 23 '16 at 12:14
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    Shouldn't Segment Tree have O(n logn) space in the first table? – Danny_ds Nov 23 at 15:48
  • @Danny_ds good spot! I've updated the table. – icc97 Nov 24 at 15:46

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