7
private static int Fibonoci(int n) {
static int first=0;
static int second=1;
static int sum;
if(n>0)

i am getting a error "Illegal Modifier" and if i remove static keyword there is no error and i need those variables to be static

  • wrap them in a class. – BigMike Jul 4 '13 at 12:43
  • 4
    I need those variables to be static then declare them as static fields in your class. – Pshemo Jul 4 '13 at 12:44
  • why do you need them to be static? – Joeri Hendrickx Jul 4 '13 at 12:49
  • I shared some links in my ans go to those links for fabonacci series and don't use static varibles till you actually need them. – Ashish Aggarwal Jul 4 '13 at 12:53
14

You can not declare varibale as static inside a method.
Inside method all variables are local variables that has no existance outside this method thats why they cann't be static.

static int first=0;
static int second=1;
static int sum;
private static int Fibonoci(int n) {
   //do somthing
}

You are trying to write code for fibonacci series and for that you don't need static variables for that just here is some links who describes the sol for that

http://crunchify.com/write-java-program-to-print-fibonacci-series-upto-n-number/

http://electrofriends.com/source-codes/software-programs/java/basic-programs/java-program-find-fibonacci-series-number/

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    only class variables (fields) and methods can be static. – vikingsteve Jul 4 '13 at 12:45
3

statics at function scope are disallowed in Java.

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2

The Root cause: Static Variables are allocated memory at class loading time because they are part of the class and not its object.

Now, if static variable is inside a method, then that variable comes under the method's scope and JVM will be unable to allocate memory to it.

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  • 1
    But that's exactly what static local variables are used for in languages like C or C++: to use the static memory instead of the stack, but limit their scope to the inside of a function. Static variable in the class scope is a different thing, because it is visible to all other methods. – SasQ May 6 '16 at 6:51
1

You can't declare a static variable inside a method, static means that it's a variable/method of a class, it belongs to the whole class but not to one of its certain objects. This means that static keyword can be used only in a 'class scope' i.e. it doesn't have any sense inside methods.

I don't know what you are trying to achieve, but if you really want these variables to be static then you can declare them as static fields in your class.

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1

Local variables cannot be declared static. In other words Static doesn't apply to local variables.

And I didn't see any use of declaring them static there.

Follow JLs on static fields

A static field, sometimes called a class variable, is incarnated when the class is initialized (§12.4).

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0

You have to define static variables as members in class. Variables those are defined within method are local variables and their lifecycles ends at the end of the method. local variables are call specific, member variables are object specific and static variables are class specific variables.

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0

You need to declare the static variables outside of the function:

static int first=0;
static int second=1;
static int sum;
private static int Fibonoci(int n) {
    if(n>0)
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0

You can not declare varibale as static inside a method. In otherwords we can say that, Local variables cannot be declared static.

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0

This varibles called Local Variables, they are inside method scop or constructor, they can't be instance or class variables.

private static int COUNT;// Class Variable
private static int Fibonoci(int n) {
 int a =3 ; // local variable
}

I need those variables to be static, okey , Why do you need this? because static variables used for special purpuse, however, you can create static fields like I did above code.

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