11

Is there a way to define an ArrayList with the double type? I tried both

ArrayList list = new ArrayList<Double>(1.38, 2.56, 4.3);

and

ArrayList list = new ArrayList<double>(1.38, 2.56, 4.3);

The first code showed that the constructor ArrayList<Double>(double, double, double) is undefined and the second code shows that dimensions are required after double.

24

Try this:

List<Double> list = Arrays.asList(1.38, 2.56, 4.3);

which returns a fixed size list.

If you need an expandable list, pass this result to the ArrayList constructor:

List<Double> list = new ArrayList<>(Arrays.asList(1.38, 2.56, 4.3));
  • Thanks. I knew I was missing something. Everyone's answers helped but changing the type to List did the trick. – Robert Lu Jul 5 '13 at 5:09
  • 2
    Arrays.asList does not return an unmodifiable list. It returns a fixed-size list. You can set elements, but you cannot add or remove. – Jeffrey Jul 5 '13 at 5:19
  • @Jeffrey Thanks for posting! I never realised that... I had always assumed it was unmodifiable, because it exploded when I tried to add. I never tried modifying via set. Answer updated. Cheers. – Bohemian Jul 5 '13 at 5:23
  • I don't get it ... Can I get some kind of explanation as to why the answer by @Rohan Salunkhe and voidHead is not the best one to use in this case? – Luke Burgess Feb 6 '16 at 21:13
  • @luke maybe because rohan's answer is an exact copy of part of my answer (and posted after mine), but without any explanation, voidHead's overs (IMHO inelegant) multiline solutions, whereas both approaches in my answer are single lines. – Bohemian Feb 7 '16 at 1:46
21
ArrayList list = new ArrayList<Double>(1.38, 2.56, 4.3);

needs to be changed to:

List<Double> list = new ArrayList<Double>();
list.add(1.38);
list.add(2.56);
list.add(4.3);
4

Try this,

ArrayList<Double> numb= new ArrayList<Double>(Arrays.asList(1.38, 2.56, 4.3));
3

You are encountering a problem because you cannot construct the ArrayList and populate it at the same time. You either need to create it and then manually populate it as such:

ArrayList list = new ArrayList<Double>();
list.add(1.38);
...

Or, alternatively if it is more convenient for you, you can populate the ArrayList from a primitive array containing your values. For example:

Double[] array = {1.38, 2.56, 4.3};
ArrayList<Double> list = new ArrayList<Double>(Arrays.asList(array));
2

You can use Arrays.asList to get some list (not necessarily ArrayList) and then use addAll() to add it to an ArrayList:

new ArrayList<Double>().addAll(Arrays.asList(1.38L, 2.56L, 4.3L));

If you're using Java6 (or higher) you can also use the ArrayList constructor that takes another list:

new ArrayList<Double>(Arrays.asList(1.38L, 2.56L, 4.3L));
1

Using guava

Doubles.asList(1.2, 5.6, 10.1);

or immutable list

ImmutableList.of(1.2, 5.6, 10.1);
1

Try this:

 List<Double> l1= new ArrayList<Double>();
 l1.add(1.38);
 l1.add(2.56);
 l1.add(4.3);
1

1) "Unnecessarily complicated" is IMHO to create first an unmodifiable List before adding its elements to the ArrayList.

2) The solution matches exact the question: "Is there a way to define an ArrayList with the double type?"

double type:

double[] arr = new double[] {1.38, 2.56, 4.3};

ArrayList:

ArrayList<Double> list = DoubleStream.of( arr ).boxed().collect(
    Collectors.toCollection( new Supplier<ArrayList<Double>>() {
      public ArrayList<Double> get() {
        return( new ArrayList<Double>() );
      }
    } ) );

…and this creates the same compact and fast compilation as its Java 1.8 short-form:

ArrayList<Double> list = DoubleStream.of( arr ).boxed().collect(
    Collectors.toCollection( ArrayList::new ) );
-1
double[] arr = new double[] {1.38, 2.56, 4.3};

ArrayList<Double> list = DoubleStream.of( arr ).boxed().collect(
    Collectors.toCollection( new Supplier<ArrayList<Double>>() {
      public ArrayList<Double> get() {
        return( new ArrayList<Double>() );
      }
    } ) );
  • There is no explanation with this answer, and it seems like an unnecessarily complicated way to solve the problem. – Laurenz Albe Oct 9 '18 at 16:27
  • Welcome to SO, it is always a good idea to add some explanation to your answer – f-CJ Oct 9 '18 at 16:38

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