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I want to use Spanish instead of English to program in Python. How to define aliases for keywords such as if and for?

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    You can't unless you write your own interpreter in Spanish :) – Markon Jul 5 '13 at 13:06
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    You don't. And if you somehow managed to do it, then you would not be able to get help from non-Spanish speakers, and it will also be harder for you to work on international projects in the future. – Some programmer dude Jul 5 '13 at 13:07
  • Sure you can, just modify the statement's names in the grammar file included in Python source, and recompile Python. But this is a rather bad idea. – michaelmeyer Jul 5 '13 at 13:12
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    It's a subtle distinction: Python is not English, but rather a separate language whose tokens happen to coincide with English words. A language with tokens that coincide with Spanish instead is not Python, but some other language. – chepner Jul 5 '13 at 13:24
  • @chepner if Python had macro support (bad idea IMHO) then would be even subtler distinction – Sled Jul 5 '13 at 13:32
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  1. You don't. "if" and "for" are hardcoded parts of Python. You could write your own programming language or a translator but you can't do what you are asking for in real Python (you could in Lisp or in C/C++ using macros).

  2. More importantly, programming is done in English. It's not necessarily fair, but that is the way it is. All the documentation is in English and so are the the methods from all the libraries. From ESR: "that English is the working language of the hacker culture and the Internet, and that you will need to know it to function in the hacker community." and "Linus Torvalds, a Finn, comments his code in English (it apparently never occurred to him to do otherwise). His fluency in English has been an important factor in his ability to recruit a worldwide community of developers for Linux. It's an example worth following."

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    I've always commented in English, too. Using local language is counterproductive (esp if it didn't import all technical terms related to CS and programming, or did but nobody knows them anyway). – Cat Plus Plus Jul 5 '13 at 13:27
  • I think it depends on the fluency of the developers. If all the developers are Chinese and their English is poor, then their English comments would have no value over Chinese comments. If the project is internal then there is no reason not to IMHO. – Sled Jul 5 '13 at 13:30
  • A new problem arises: English or American English? – Morwenn Jul 5 '13 at 13:50
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    @ArtB You never know the future of a project and who has to maintain it in a few years – Michael Butscher Jul 5 '13 at 13:53
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    @Morwenn I use American English for code because it's more concise and tends to be consistent with 3rd party libraries. In comments the two are similar enough that it doesn't really matter. – cgmb Jul 5 '13 at 16:56
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in general this is not possible (easily). you can look at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Non-English-based_programming_languages to see what others did previously and especially have a look at the projects that translated python to russian/chinese and determine how much work that was (a lot) and if it is worth to do it for spanish (probably not).

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If you are fine to have iPython as a dependency, you might have a look at Custom input transformation — IPython 3.2.1 documentation.

Basically, ipython is already preprocessing anything that is given to the prompt, and it allows code to specify more transformations in the various compilation steps it handles before passing it to the python interpreter itself.

At first glance, the most approriate transformer for transforming reserved keywords is TokenInputTransformer.wrap().

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I think you're required to re-compile Python and do your changes by yourself. Anyway, this is a general discussion about it:

http://www.python.org/dev/peps/pep-0306/

(No te queda otra tío :)...)

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    And by doing that, you're making your own fork of Python that's incompatible with 100% of Python code out there. Good job. (Don't do this, PEP306 is a guide for core developers.) – Cat Plus Plus Jul 5 '13 at 13:29
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    I'm just answering his question, not evaluating if it's the right way to develop or not. – Shaddy Jul 5 '13 at 14:27

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