174

I have the following database table on a Postgres server:

id      date          Product Sales
1245    01/04/2013    Toys    1000     
1245    01/04/2013    Toys    2000
1231    01/02/2013    Bicycle 50000
456461  01/01/2014    Bananas 4546

I would like to create a query that gives the SUM of the Sales column and groups the results by month and year as follows:

Apr    2013    3000     Toys
Feb    2013    50000    Bicycle
Jan    2014    4546     Bananas

Is there a simple way to do that?

0
240
select to_char(date,'Mon') as mon,
       extract(year from date) as yyyy,
       sum("Sales") as "Sales"
from yourtable
group by 1,2

At the request of Radu, I will explain that query:

to_char(date,'Mon') as mon, : converts the "date" attribute into the defined format of the short form of month.

extract(year from date) as yyyy : Postgresql's "extract" function is used to extract the YYYY year from the "date" attribute.

sum("Sales") as "Sales" : The SUM() function adds up all the "Sales" values, and supplies a case-sensitive alias, with the case sensitivity maintained by using double-quotes.

group by 1,2 : The GROUP BY function must contain all columns from the SELECT list that are not part of the aggregate (aka, all columns not inside SUM/AVG/MIN/MAX etc functions). This tells the query that the SUM() should be applied for each unique combination of columns, which in this case are the month and year columns. The "1,2" part is a shorthand instead of using the column aliases, though it is probably best to use the full "to_char(...)" and "extract(...)" expressions for readability.

9
  • 7
    I don't think giving an answer without an explanation is a very good idea, especially for beginners. You should have explained the logic behind your answer, maybe at least a bit (although it may seem simple and straightforward for the rest of us). – Radu Gheorghiu Jul 5 '13 at 15:40
  • 1
    @BurakArslan Did the results look like what the OP specifically asked for? – bma Nov 24 '14 at 20:41
  • 2
    @rogerdpack, the output of date_trunc is not exactly what the asker wanted: select date_trunc('month', timestamp '2001-02-16 20:38:40')::date => 2001-02-01 – Pikachu Jan 9 '15 at 17:14
  • 2
    I like the idea of using date_trunc in the group by clause. – Pikachu Jan 9 '15 at 17:15
  • 1
    Possible "field must be in group by clause" issues... It's better to use OVER (PARTITION BY). – Zon Mar 22 '19 at 8:16
352

I can't believe the accepted answer has so many upvotes -- it's a horrible method.

Here's the correct way to do it, with date_trunc:

   SELECT date_trunc('month', txn_date) AS txn_month, sum(amount) as monthly_sum
     FROM yourtable
 GROUP BY txn_month

It's bad practice but you might be forgiven if you use

 GROUP BY 1

in a very simple query.

You can also use

 GROUP BY date_trunc('month', txn_date)

if you don't want to select the date.

9
  • 8
    unfortunately the output of date_trunc is not what the asker expected: select date_trunc('month', timestamp '2001-02-16 20:38:40') => 2001-02-01 00:00:00. – Pikachu Jan 9 '15 at 17:12
  • 7
    I agree that this method is better. I'm not sure but I think it's more efficient too, as there is only one grouping instead of two. If you need to reformat the date you can do it afterwards using the methods described in other answers: to_char(date_trunc('month', txn_date), 'YY-Mon') – Paweł Sokołowski Feb 28 '15 at 23:58
  • 2
    yes, the number of votes for the accepted answer is mind boggling. date_trunc was created for this exact purpose. there is no reason to create two columns – allenwlee Sep 6 '15 at 2:39
  • 2
    Very nice! This is a superior answer, especially since you can order as well. Upvoted! – bobmarksie Jun 20 '16 at 10:35
  • 2
    Yet another example where the most upvoted answer should appear before the accepted answer – Brian Risk Apr 25 '18 at 15:28
40

to_char actually lets you pull out the Year and month in one fell swoop!

select to_char(date('2014-05-10'),'Mon-YY') as year_month; --'May-14'
select to_char(date('2014-05-10'),'YYYY-MM') as year_month; --'2014-05'

or in the case of the user's example above:

select to_char(date,'YY-Mon') as year_month
       sum("Sales") as "Sales"
from some_table
group by 1;
4
  • 7
    I would advise strongly against doing this if you have a decent amount of data in your table. This performs much worse than the date_trunc method when performing the group by. Experimenting on a DB I have handy, on a table with 270k rows, the date_trunc method is over twice the speed of TO_CHAR – Chris Clark Feb 7 '17 at 0:24
  • @ChrisClark if performance is a concern, I agree that it might make sense to use date_trunc, but in some cases having a formatted date string is preferable, and if you're using a performant data warehouse the additional computation might not be a deal breaker. For example, if you are running a quick analytics report using redshift, and it usually takes 3 seconds, a 6 second query is probably okay (although, if you are running reports, the additional computation might slow things down by a smaller percentage, because there is a larger computational overhead) – mgoldwasser Feb 7 '17 at 1:54
  • 1
    you can still do that -- just do the formatting as a separate step by 'wrapping' the group by query. E.g. SELECT to_char(d, 'YYYY-DD') FROM (SELECT date_trunc('month', d) AS "d" FROM tbl) AS foo. Best of both worlds! – Chris Clark Mar 26 '17 at 21:05
  • 1
    This solution is simple and elegant. I like it and in my case it is fast enough. Thank you for this answer! – guettli Jun 1 '18 at 8:38
6

There is another way to achieve the result using the date_part() function in postgres.

 SELECT date_part('month', txn_date) AS txn_month, date_part('year', txn_date) AS txn_year, sum(amount) as monthly_sum
     FROM yourtable
 GROUP BY date_part('month', txn_date)

Thanks

2

Take a look at example E of this tutorial -> https://www.postgresqltutorial.com/postgresql-group-by/

You need to call the function on your GROUP BY instead of calling the name of the virtual attribute you created on select. I was doing what all the answers above recommended and I was getting a column 'year_month' does not exist error.

What worked for me was:

SELECT 
    date_trunc('month', created_at), 'MM/YYYY' AS month
FROM 
    "orders"  
GROUP BY 
    date_trunc('month', created_at)
1

bma answer is great! I have used it with ActiveRecords, here it is if anybody needs it in Rails:

Model.find_by_sql(
  "SELECT TO_CHAR(created_at, 'Mon') AS month,
   EXTRACT(year from created_at) as year,
   SUM(desired_value) as desired_value
   FROM desired_table
   GROUP BY 1,2
   ORDER BY 1,2"
)
1
  • 3
    or you can do yourscopeorclass.group("extract(year from tablename.colname)") and you can chain that together 3 times to get year, month, day – nruth Apr 11 '15 at 17:11
0

Postgres has few types of timestamps:

timestamp without timezone - (Preferable to store UTC timestamps) You find it in multinational database storage. The client in this case will take care of the timezone offset for each country.

timestamp with timezone - The timezone offset is already included in the timestamp.

In some cases, your database does not use the timezone but you still need to group records in respect with local timezone and Daylight Saving Time (e.g. https://www.timeanddate.com/time/zone/romania/bucharest)

To add timezone you can use this example and replace the timezone offset with yours.

"your_date_column" at time zone '+03'

To add the +1 Summer Time offset specific to DST you need to check if your timestamp falls into a Summer DST. As those intervals varies with 1 or 2 days, I will use an aproximation that does not affect the end of month records, so in this case i can ignore each year exact interval.

If more precise query has to be build, then you have to add conditions to create more cases. But roughly, this will work fine in splitting data per month in respect with timezone and SummerTime when you find timestamp without timezone in your database:

SELECT 
    "id", "Product", "Sale",
    date_trunc('month', 
        CASE WHEN 
            Extract(month from t."date") > 03 AND
            Extract(day from t."date") > 26 AND
            Extract(hour from t."date") > 3 AND
            Extract(month from t."date") < 10 AND
            Extract(day from t."date") < 29 AND
            Extract(hour from t."date") < 4
        THEN 
            t."date" at time zone '+03' -- Romania TimeZone offset + DST
        ELSE
            t."date" at time zone '+02' -- Romania TimeZone offset 
        END) as "date"
FROM 
    public."Table" AS t
WHERE 1=1
    AND t."date" >= '01/07/2015 00:00:00'::TIMESTAMP WITHOUT TIME ZONE
    AND t."date" < '01/07/2017 00:00:00'::TIMESTAMP WITHOUT TIME ZONE
GROUP BY date_trunc('month', 
    CASE WHEN 
        Extract(month from t."date") > 03 AND
        Extract(day from t."date") > 26 AND
        Extract(hour from t."date") > 3 AND
        Extract(month from t."date") < 10 AND
        Extract(day from t."date") < 29 AND
        Extract(hour from t."date") < 4
    THEN 
        t."date" at time zone '+03' -- Romania TimeZone offset + DST
    ELSE
        t."date" at time zone '+02' -- Romania TimeZone offset 
    END)

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.