Trying to install modules from github results in:

ENOENT error on package.json.

Easily reproduced using express:

npm install https://github.com/visionmedia/express throws error.

npm install express works.

Why can't I install from github?

Here is the console output:

npm http GET https://github.com/visionmedia/express.git
npm http 200 https://github.com/visionmedia/express.git
npm ERR! not a package /home/guym/tmp/npm-32312/1373176518024-0.6586997057311237/tmp.tgz
npm ERR! Error: ENOENT, open '/home/guym/tmp/npm-32312/1373176518024-0.6586997057311237/package/package.json'
npm ERR! If you need help, you may report this log at:
npm ERR!     <http://github.com/isaacs/npm/issues>
npm ERR! or email it to:
npm ERR!     <npm-@googlegroups.com>

npm ERR! System Linux 3.8.0-23-generic
npm ERR! command "/usr/bin/node" "/usr/bin/npm" "install" "https://github.com/visionmedia/express.git"
npm ERR! cwd /home/guym/dev_env/projects_GIT/proj/somename
npm ERR! node -v v0.10.10
npm ERR! npm -v 1.2.25
npm ERR! path /home/guym/tmp/npm-32312/1373176518024-0.6586997057311237/package/package.json
npm ERR! code ENOENT
npm ERR! errno 34
npm ERR! 
npm ERR! Additional logging details can be found in:
npm ERR!     /home/guym/dev_env/projects_GIT/proj/somename/npm-debug.log
npm ERR! not ok code 0
  • 1
    Can anyone give the package.json devDependencies format? – Adam Sep 17 '16 at 18:47
  • @Adam you can add "express": "github:visionmedia/express" to the "dependencies" section of package.json file, then run: npm install (as mentioned below) – Danny Jan 5 at 1:48
  • @danny, that doesn't work for me. i wonder if there was a dist folder in that express repo to enable it. – ml242 Jan 11 at 17:14

13 Answers 13

up vote 858 down vote accepted

Because https://github.com/visionmedia/express is the URL of a web page and not an npm module. Use this flavor:

git+https://git@github.com/visionmedia/express.git

or this flavor if you need SSH:

git+ssh://git@github.com/visionmedia/express.git
  • 67
    You can also use git+https://github.com/visionmedia/express.git to use https rather than ssh. – Steve Willcock Jul 7 '13 at 10:36
  • 31
    Note that repository you want to install must be a npm module, it must contain a package.json file or else you will get this error: Error: ENOENT, open 'tmp.tgz-unpack/package.json'. – GabLeRoux Jul 28 '14 at 14:18
  • 11
    what if I want a specific branch – kilianc Oct 22 '14 at 20:21
  • 36
    @kilianc you do it like commits git+ssh://....repo.git#branch – yellowsir May 21 '15 at 18:58
  • 27
    Worth saying that you might need to escape the # to use a specific branch from the shell, i.e.: npm install git+https://github.com/user/repo.git\#branch – mor Jul 7 '15 at 13:57

You can also do npm install visionmedia/express to install from Github

or

npm install visionmedia/express#branch

There is also support for installing directly from a Gist, Bitbucket, Gitlab, and a number of other specialized formats. Look at the npm install documentation for them all.

  • 13
    What, without specifying URL? How does npm know which flavor hosting service you're using? – Jake Rayson Sep 8 '14 at 15:39
  • 12
    @Jake Rayson: it's possible since version 1.1.65 and works for github.com only. – Ezze Sep 30 '14 at 13:03
  • 3
    Didn't work for me on Windows - it just tried to install from a subfolder of my current directory. – Jarrod Mosen Dec 4 '14 at 22:54
  • 5
    Note this doesn't work on global installs (i.e. npm i repo/pkg -g) as of npm 1.4.28 – user3751385 May 23 '15 at 15:16
  • 13
    npm install user/repo#branch works as well. – Douglas Ludlow Jun 13 '16 at 18:19

If git is not installed, we can try

npm install --save https://github.com/Amitesh/gulp-rev-all/tarball/master
  • 6
    Great answer! It worked for me while other commands (from other answers) were stuck at some git fetching logic. – Daniel Kmak Sep 29 '15 at 18:00
  • 1
    You can also use tag names in place of master. Probably safer to do it that way. – mpen Jan 14 '16 at 19:30
  • 1
    What does the -i flag do? – Linus Arver Feb 26 '16 at 1:20
  • 4
    Nice for when you are working with branches, you should modify your answer to include a general format answer, i didn't notice the /tarball/ at first – Zagen Apr 11 '16 at 4:46
  • 1
    this is the only solution which worked for me thanks man – maq Sep 9 '17 at 22:09

There's also npm install https://github.com/{USER}/{REPO}/tarball/{BRANCH} to use a different branch.

  • I ran into this issue...github.com/yarnpkg/yarn/issues/2738 I was able to change the registry to the github tarball registry and it worked.. Thanks! – Matt Goo Jul 17 '17 at 21:51
  • This resolved some major performance issues for me. Using {USER}/{REPO}.git#{BRANCH} was very slow. – Erik Koopmans Oct 22 '17 at 12:35

UPDATE sept 2016

Installing from vanilla https github URLs now seems to work:

npm install https://github.com/fergiemcdowall/search-index.git

EDIT: there are a couple of users commenting that you cant do this for all modules because you are reading from a source control system, which may well contain invalid/uncompiled/buggy code. So to be clear (although it should go without saying): given that the code in the repo is in an npm-usable state, you can now quite happily install directly from github

  • 7
    You can't install any npm package you want from its GitHub source, unless the repo includes a dist folder, and most don't. The issue I linked to is an npm bug - the prebuild step is not run when installing from GitHub. As an example, try installing node-influx/node-influx. – Dan Dascalescu Oct 18 '16 at 18:31
  • 2
    Repos without dist folders CAN be installed from GitHub, for example: npm install https://github.com/fergiemcdowall/search-index-adder works perfectly. – Fergie Oct 19 '16 at 8:50
  • 2
    Right, because you have the directly usabel source in /lib (as if you had a dist folder). My point is that just including the GitHub URL of a repo in package.jons isn't guaranteed to work for installing that repo. Modules written in TypeScript, for example, need push their transpiled code into the repo. They typically don't do this, but rather use a prepublish script to dump the .JS code into a dist folder, which gets uploaded to npmjs.com. – Dan Dascalescu Oct 19 '16 at 10:30
  • 2
    I know this is a bit late, but the trick is actually npm does not have a 1-to-1 mapping to Git repositories. Some projects build their source files before publishing rather than before committing, meaning they are NOT in the Git repo, but would be in the npm package - projects doing this will not work right from Git. Another example of how this can fail is macro repositories - Babel's GitHub project, for example, includes hundreds of individual npm packages in subfolders. They can be published individually because npm does not map directly to Git. npm publishes whatever is in your directory. – John Chadwick Jan 10 '17 at 19:03
  • 1
    For anyone who stumbles upon this later... As of npm5, npm will run any prepare script for bare "installs", which includes git deps. Which means the above comments around compilation and dist folders is out of date. Any package that properly sets their compilation to run on prepare will work just fine as a git dep without committing any compiled assets into git. – jasonkarns Nov 10 '17 at 5:37

The current top answer by Peter Lyons is not relevant with recent NPM versions. For example, using the same command that was criticized in this answer is now fine.

$ npm install https://github.com/visionmedia/express

If you have continued problems it might be a problem with whatever package you were using.

The methods are covered pretty well now in npm's install documentation as well as the numerous other answers here.

npm install git+ssh://git@github.com:<githubname>/<githubrepo.git[#<commit-ish>]
npm install git+ssh://git@github.com:<githubname>/<githubrepo.git>[#semver:^x.x]
npm install git+https://git@github.com/<githubname>/<githubrepo.git>
npm install git://github.com/<githubname>/<githubrepo.git>
npm install github:<githubname>/<githubrepo>[#<commit-ish>]

However, something notable that has changed recently is npm adding the prepare script to replace the prepublish script. This fixes a longstanding problem where modules installed via git did not run the prepublish script and thus did not complete the build steps that occur when a module is published to the npm registry. See https://github.com/npm/npm/issues/3055.

Of course, the module authors will need to update their package.json to use the new prepare directive for this to start working.

Install it directly:

npm install visionmedia/express

Alternatively, you can add "express": "github:visionmedia/express" to the "dependencies" section of package.json file, then run:

npm install

The general form of the syntax is

<protocol>://[<user>[:<password>]@]<hostname>[:<port>][:][/]<path>[#<commit-ish> | #semver:<semver>]

which means for your case it will be

npm install git+ssh://git@github.com/visionmedia/express.git

From npmjs docs:

npm install :

Installs the package from the hosted git provider, cloning it with git. For a full git remote url, only that URL will be attempted.

<protocol>://[<user>[:<password>]@]<hostname>[:<port>][:][/]<path>[#<commit-ish>

| #semver:] is one of git, git+ssh, git+http, git+https, or git+file.

If # is provided, it will be used to clone exactly that commit. If the commit-ish has the format #semver:, can be any valid semver range or exact version, and npm will look for any tags or refs matching that range in the remote repository, much as it would for a registry dependency. If neither # or

semver: is specified, then master is used.

If the repository makes use of submodules, those submodules will be cloned as well.

If the package being installed contains a prepare script, its dependencies and devDependencies will be installed, and the prepare script will be run, before the package is packaged and installed.

The following git environment variables are recognized by npm and will be added to the environment when running git:

  • GIT_ASKPASS
  • GIT_EXEC_PATH
  • GIT_PROXY_COMMAND
  • GIT_SSH
  • GIT_SSH_COMMAND
  • GIT_SSL_CAINFO GIT_SSL_NO_VERIFY

See the git man page for details.

Examples:

npm install git+ssh://git@github.com:npm/npm.git#v1.0.27
npm install git+ssh://git@github.com:npm/npm#semver:^5.0
npm install git+https://isaacs@github.com/npm/npm.git
npm install git://github.com/npm/npm.git#v1.0.27
GIT_SSH_COMMAND='ssh -i ~/.ssh/custom_ident' npm install git+ssh://git@github.com:npm/npm.git npm install

You could also do

npm i alex-cory/fasthacks

or

npm i github:alex-cory/fasthacks

Basically:

npm i user_or_org/repo_name

UPDATE now you can do: npm install git://github.com/foo/bar.git
or in package.json:

"dependencies": {
  "bar": "git://github.com/foo/bar.git"
}

You can directly install an github repo by npm install command, like this: npm install https://github.com/futurechallenger/npm_git_install.git --save

NOTE: In the repo which will be installed by npm command:

  1. maybe you have to have a dist folder in you repo, according to @Dan Dascalescu's comment.
  2. You definitely have to have a package.json in you repo! which I forget add.

Try this command

 npm install github:[Organisation]/[Repository]#[master/BranchName] -g

this command worked for me.

 npm install github:BlessCSS/bless#3.x -g
  • 9
    DO NOT USE SUDO WITH NPM INSTALL! rather use chown to change owner. – Marek Fajkus Aug 5 '16 at 16:35
  • The version is the tag / branch name or the package.json version ? – mfrachet Aug 25 '16 at 13:56
  • @MarekFajkus if you install on Linux through a package manager using sudo... you'll have to use root if you want to install packages globally – Ray Foss Oct 24 '17 at 19:40
  • @RayFoss A year late but... that's only if you want the globally installed package to be available to all users, which is seldom the case. Just configure npm to install global packages in ~/node_modules, then you never need sudo. – Mr5o1 Nov 4 at 3:04

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