116

I have written a library that I used to compile using a self-written Makefile, but now I want to switch to cmake. The tree looks like this (I removed all the irrelevant files):

.
├── include
│   ├── animation.h
│   ├── buffers.h
│   ├── ...
│   ├── vertex.h
│   └── world.h
└── src
    ├── animation.cpp
    ├── buffers.cpp
    ├── ...
    ├── vertex.cpp
    └── world.cpp

So what I am trying to do is just to compile the source into a shared library and then install it with the header files.

Most examples that I have found compile executables with some shared libraries but never just a plain shared library. It would also be helpful if someone could just tell me a very simple library that uses cmake, so I can use this as an example.

155

Always specifiy minimum required version of cmake

cmake_minimum_required(VERSION 3.9)

You should declare a project. cmake says it is mandatory and it will define convenient variables PROJECT_NAME, PROJECT_VERSION and PROJECT_DESCRIPTION (this latter variable necessitate cmake 3.9):

project(mylib VERSION 1.0.1 DESCRIPTION "mylib description")

Declare a new library target. Please avoid use of file(GLOB ...). This feature does not provide attended mastery of compilation process. If you are lazy, copy-paste output of ls -1 sources/*.cpp :

add_library(mylib SHARED
    sources/animation.cpp
    sources/buffers.cpp
    [...]
)

Set VERSION property (optional but it is a good practice):

set_target_properties(mylib PROPERTIES VERSION ${PROJECT_VERSION})

You can also set SOVERSION to major number of VERSION. So libmylib.so.1 will be a symlink to libmylib.so.1.0.0.

set_target_properties(mylib PROPERTIES SOVERSION 1)

Declare public API of your library. This API will be installed for third-party application. It is a good practice to isolate it in your project tree (like placing it include/ directory). Notice that, private headers should not be installed and I strongly suggest to place them with the source files.

set_target_properties(mylib PROPERTIES PUBLIC_HEADER include/mylib.h)

If you work with subdirectories, it is not very convenient to include relative path like "../include/mylib.h". So, pass top directory in included directories:

target_include_directories(mylib PRIVATE .)

or

target_include_directories(mylib PRIVATE include)
target_include_directories(mylib PRIVATE src)

Create install rule for your library. I suggest to use variables CMAKE_INSTALL_*DIR defined in GNUInstallDirs:

include(GNUInstallDirs)

And declare files to install:

install(TARGETS mylib
    LIBRARY DESTINATION ${CMAKE_INSTALL_LIBDIR}
    PUBLIC_HEADER DESTINATION ${CMAKE_INSTALL_INCLUDEDIR})

You may also export a pkg-config file. This files allows third-party application to easily import your library:

Create a template file named mylib.pc.in (see pc(5) manpage for more information):

prefix=@CMAKE_INSTALL_PREFIX@
exec_prefix=@CMAKE_INSTALL_PREFIX@
libdir=${exec_prefix}/@CMAKE_INSTALL_LIBDIR@
includedir=${prefix}/@CMAKE_INSTALL_INCLUDEDIR@

Name: @PROJECT_NAME@
Description: @PROJECT_DESCRIPTION@
Version: @PROJECT_VERSION@

Requires:
Libs: -L${libdir} -lmylib
Cflags: -I${includedir}

In your CMakeLists.txt, add a rule to expand @ macros (@ONLY ask to cmake to not expand variables of the form ${VAR}):

configure_file(mylib.pc.in mylib.pc @ONLY)

And finally, install generated file:

install(FILES ${CMAKE_BINARY_DIR}/mylib.pc DESTINATION ${CMAKE_INSTALL_DATAROOTDIR}/pkgconfig)

You may also use cmake EXPORT feature. However, this feature is only compatible with cmake and I find it difficult to use.

Finally the entire CMakeLists.txt should looks like:

cmake_minimum_required(VERSION 3.9)
project(mylib VERSION 1.0.1 DESCRIPTION "mylib description")
include(GNUInstallDirs)
add_library(mylib SHARED src/mylib.c)
set_target_properties(mylib PROPERTIES
    VERSION ${PROJECT_VERSION}
    SOVERSION 1
    PUBLIC_HEADER api/mylib.h)
configure_file(mylib.pc.in mylib.pc @ONLY)
target_include_directories(mylib PRIVATE .)
install(TARGETS mylib
    LIBRARY DESTINATION ${CMAKE_INSTALL_LIBDIR}
    PUBLIC_HEADER DESTINATION ${CMAKE_INSTALL_INCLUDEDIR})
install(FILES ${CMAKE_BINARY_DIR}/mylib.pc
    DESTINATION ${CMAKE_INSTALL_DATAROOTDIR}/pkgconfig)
  • 8
    Just complementing the @Jezz's awesome explanation: after all steps above, the programmer can build and install the library by mkdir build && cd build/ && cmake .. && sudo make install (or sudo make install/strip to install the striped library version). – silvioprog Jan 16 '18 at 4:04
  • Do you have a technique for passing down library dependencies? For example if mylib depended on liblog4cxx, what would be a good way of flowing that all the way through to mylib.pc? – mpr Jul 3 '18 at 20:45
  • 1
    @mpr If liblog4cxx provide a .pc file, add Requires: liblog4cxx to your mylib.pc, else, you can just add -llog4cxx to Libs:. – Jérôme Pouiller Jul 4 '18 at 7:07
  • How would I use this library in another project? Could you extend your example? – Damir Porobic Aug 12 '18 at 8:06
  • And do you add all headers to PUBLIC_HEADER or only the one that other users should be able to see? If not, what do you do with all the other headers? – Damir Porobic Aug 12 '18 at 8:31
73

This minimal CMakeLists.txt file compiles a simple shared library:

cmake_minimum_required(VERSION 2.8)

project (test)
set(CMAKE_BUILD_TYPE Release)

include_directories(${CMAKE_CURRENT_SOURCE_DIR}/include)
add_library(test SHARED src/test.cpp)

However, I have no experience copying files to a different destination with CMake. The file command with the COPY/INSTALL signature looks like it might be useful.

  • 27
    CMAKE_BUILD_TYPE should be omitted, so the decision is up to the one who compiles. – ManuelSchneid3r Sep 30 '16 at 21:26
  • Does specifying ${CMAKE_CURRENT_SOURCE_DIR}/ in include_directories is usefull? – Jérôme Pouiller Aug 23 '17 at 14:58
  • @Jezz I don't think so, the same directory gets included without the prefix. It would matter if you were in a subdirectory, however. – Arnav Borborah Mar 16 '18 at 12:15
23

I'm trying to learn how to do this myself, and it seems you can install the library like this:

cmake_minimum_required(VERSION 2.4.0)

project(mycustomlib)

# Find source files
file(GLOB SOURCES src/*.cpp)

# Include header files
include_directories(include)

# Create shared library
add_library(${PROJECT_NAME} SHARED ${SOURCES})

# Install library
install(TARGETS ${PROJECT_NAME} DESTINATION lib/${PROJECT_NAME})

# Install library headers
file(GLOB HEADERS include/*.h)
install(FILES ${HEADERS} DESTINATION include/${PROJECT_NAME})
9

First, this is the directory layout that I am using:

.
├── include
│   ├── class1.hpp
│   ├── ...
│   └── class2.hpp
└── src
    ├── class1.cpp
    ├── ...
    └── class2.cpp

After a couple of days taking a look into this, this is my favourite way of doing this thanks to modern CMake:

cmake_minimum_required(VERSION 3.5)
project(mylib VERSION 1.0.0 LANGUAGES CXX)

set(DEFAULT_BUILD_TYPE "Release")

if(NOT CMAKE_BUILD_TYPE AND NOT CMAKE_CONFIGURATION_TYPES)
  message(STATUS "Setting build type to '${DEFAULT_BUILD_TYPE}' as none was specified.")
  set(CMAKE_BUILD_TYPE "${DEFAULT_BUILD_TYPE}" CACHE STRING "Choose the type of build." FORCE)
  # Set the possible values of build type for cmake-gui
  set_property(CACHE CMAKE_BUILD_TYPE PROPERTY STRINGS "Debug" "Release" "MinSizeRel" "RelWithDebInfo")
endif()

include(GNUInstallDirs)

set(SOURCE_FILES src/class1.cpp src/class2.cpp)

add_library(${PROJECT_NAME} ...)

target_include_directories(${PROJECT_NAME} PUBLIC
    $<BUILD_INTERFACE:${CMAKE_CURRENT_SOURCE_DIR}/include>
    $<INSTALL_INTERFACE:include>
    PRIVATE src)

set_target_properties(${PROJECT_NAME} PROPERTIES
    VERSION ${PROJECT_VERSION}
    SOVERSION 1)

install(TARGETS ${PROJECT_NAME} EXPORT MyLibConfig
    ARCHIVE  DESTINATION ${CMAKE_INSTALL_LIBDIR}
    LIBRARY  DESTINATION ${CMAKE_INSTALL_LIBDIR}
    RUNTIME  DESTINATION ${CMAKE_INSTALL_BINDIR})
install(DIRECTORY include/ DESTINATION ${CMAKE_INSTALL_INCLUDEDIR}/${PROJECT_NAME})

install(EXPORT MyLibConfig DESTINATION share/MyLib/cmake)

export(TARGETS ${PROJECT_NAME} FILE MyLibConfig.cmake)

After running CMake and installing the library, there is no need to use Find***.cmake files, it can be used like this:

find_package(MyLib REQUIRED)

#No need to perform include_directories(...)
target_link_libraries(${TARGET} mylib)

That's it, if it has been installed in a standard directory it will be found and there is no need to do anything else. If it has been installed in a non-standard path, it is also easy, just tell CMake where to find MyLibConfig.cmake using:

cmake -DMyLib_DIR=/non/standard/install/path ..

I hope this helps everybody as much as it has helped me. Old ways of doing this were quite cumbersome.

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