2

I have base model User and two additional models UserCreateModel and UserEditModel. UserCreateModel works just fine and user is created, but when I try to edit user it gives me error.

I don't understand why he acts up on datetime since it has valid DateTime property already in place in database. All I wanted to do is update Name property. What am I doing wrong here?

Error

The conversion of a datetime2 data type to a datetime data type resulted in an out-of-range value. The statement has been terminated.

Controller

public HttpResponseMessage PutUser(int id, UserEditModel user)
{
    if (!ModelState.IsValid)
    {
        return Request.CreateErrorResponse(HttpStatusCode.BadRequest, ModelState);
    }

    if (id != user.Id)
    {
        return Request.CreateResponse(HttpStatusCode.BadRequest);
    }

    db.Entry(user).State = EntityState.Modified;

    try
    {
        db.SaveChanges(); // Exception here, all validation passed with success
    }
    catch (DbUpdateConcurrencyException ex)
    {
        return Request.CreateErrorResponse(HttpStatusCode.NotFound, ex);
    }

    return Request.CreateResponse(HttpStatusCode.OK);
}

Model

public class User
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public virtual DateTime CreatedDateTime { get; set; }
    public virtual string Username { get; set; }
    public virtual string Password { get; set; }
    public virtual string PasswordSalt { get; set; }
    public virtual string AccessToken { get; set; }
    public virtual string Name { get; set; }
}

public class UserEditModel : User
{
    [Required]
    public override string Name { get; set; }
}
1
  • 1
    Please take a little care with title and tags. MVC != MVVM and they both have nothing to with this EF problem. Jul 7 '13 at 15:39
7

You need to tell Entity Framework to use the correct column type when you map your entities to the database.

If you are using the fluent API you can do it like this:

Property(p => p.CreatedDateTime).HasColumnType("datetime2");

or if you prefer using the column attribute directly on your POCO:

public class User
{   
    public int Id { get; set; }

    [Column(TypeName = "DateTime2")]
    public virtual DateTime CreatedDateTime { get; set; }

    public virtual string Username { get; set; }
    public virtual string Password { get; set; }
    public virtual string PasswordSalt { get; set; }
    public virtual string AccessToken { get; set; }
    public virtual string Name { get; set; }
}

Be careful; depending on how you have configured Entity Framework, your existing database may be deleted and recreated to account for the change.

See the following blog posts for further information:

2
  • Strange, now it does work but it deletes all previous values like username, password etc. and they become null. >.<
    – Stan
    Jul 7 '13 at 15:47
  • @Steve Slaumas answer covers the second problem. Jul 7 '13 at 15:56
1

By setting db.Entry(user).State = EntityState.Modified; you tell EF that you want to update all properties of user. And because your UserEditModel derives from the User entity EF will try to update all entity properties.

I don't know why you derive the Edit model from the entity but it causes problems in your scenario. I would prefer to just load the user from the Db, update the property you want and save it:

var dbUser = db.Users.Find(user.Id);
dbUser.Username = user.Name;
db.SaveChanges();

More generally you can update multiple properties like so:

var dbUser = db.Users.Find(user.Id);
db.Entry(dbUser).CurrentValues.SetValues(user);
db.SaveChanges();

But it requires that the properties in the edit model have the same name as the entity properties (and that the edit model is not derived from the entity).

6
  • I derive it because of validation. When I create user I need it to have username, password etc. When I edit I want to pass only name. If I don't create multiple models for every action I get validation errors where I should not. Is this right approach in my situation?
    – Stan
    Jul 7 '13 at 16:00
  • 1
    @Steve: In my opinion it's not the right approach. EF validation != MVC validation. Having two view models for create and edit action is OK but I would copy the properties between entity and view model and put MVC validation logic on the view models as required.
    – Slauma
    Jul 7 '13 at 16:07
  • @Steve I agree with Slauma on this. See my answer to this question which might help you. Jul 7 '13 at 16:20
  • @Benjamin so basically best way is to update the properties manually model.property = viewmodel.property like so, correct?
    – Stan
    Jul 7 '13 at 16:35
  • Or use a Framework such as AutoMapper to do it for you. Jul 7 '13 at 16:37

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