13

I have a class library called "MyAssembly" that is internally referencing a.dll, b.dll of version 3.1.1.0; I have build the project which outputed MyAssembly.dll. On a different system (box) I have created a web application project and referenced the MyAssembly.dll. the new system has new versions of a.dll and b.dll 4.0.0; I used binding redirect in web.config like below. But still unable to compile the web application. it says missing assembly reference a.dll, version 3.1.1.0.

Could any body help in solving this issue?

Thanks, Suresh

29

This totally worked for me. NOTE: You need NO namespace on the configuration tag. And you MUST have a namespace on your assemblyBinding tag.

<assemblyBinding> Element for <runtime>

<!-- important: no namespace -->
<configuration> 
  <runtime>
    <!-- important, must have this namespace -->
    <assemblyBinding xmlns="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:asm.v1"> 
      <dependentAssembly>
        <assemblyIdentity name="Strongly.Named.Assembly" publicKeyToken="xxx" culture="neutral" />
        <bindingRedirect oldVersion="0.0.0.0-2.0.0.0" newVersion="2.0.0.0" />
      </dependentAssembly>
    </assemblyBinding>
  </runtime>
</configuration>

Do both of those or else it will not read it. If it is giving an error that it cannot load anything but 2.0.0.0 in this example, then it is not picking up the config elements properly.

This also only works on strongly named assemblies. To find out if something is strongly named run the following command from the VC command window

open (start menu > all programs > visual studio > visual studio tools > visual studio command prompt)

Then run:

sn -vf "path-to-assembly.dll"

If it returns that it is valid, then it's strongly named.

source: http://blog.codingoutloud.com/2010/03/13/three-ways-to-tell-whether-an-assembly-dl-is-strong-named/

  • This totally fixed an issue I was having with a binding redirect being ignored for a web project. Thank you! – Jaans Jun 12 '13 at 4:59
  • I LOVE YOU. You totally saved my sanity. I removed the namespace from configuration tag and it just worked! – German Latorre Jun 9 '16 at 9:18
  • Big thanks! Were missing a namespace in the assemblyBinding – Igor Malin Oct 12 '16 at 4:08
6

This should work.

<runtime>  
 <dependentAssembly>  
   <assemblyIdentity name="MyAssembly" publicKeyToken="12233444"/>  
   <bindingRedirect oldVersion="3.1.1.0" newVersion="4.0.0.0"/>  
 </dependentAssembly>  
</runtime>  

Another suggestion: Remove the namespace from your configuration tag:

Instead of

<configuration xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/.NetConfiguration/v2.0">

try

<configuration>
  • I did exactly same. But no luck. While compiling the project in ide itself giving error saying " are you missing assemblyreference a.dll 3.1.1.0 – Suresh Nov 17 '09 at 21:17
  • 1
    Configuration tag does not contain xmlns attribute. No Luck – Suresh Nov 17 '09 at 21:30
  • It worked on my side, thanks. My question is why does it work when the xmlns attribute is removed? – csg Mar 21 '16 at 16:39
0

You are using MyAssembly in your web application. The binding redirect will be used for this Assembly and not the assemblies which MyAssembly uses. Check the manifest for the MyAssembly.dll, it should be referring to the 3.1.1.0 versions of a.dll, hence the compiler error is shown. Build the MyAssembly with referring to a.dll of version 4.0.0.0 and then use the MyAssembly in your web application. This will work.

0

Try this way:

<assemblyBinding xmlns="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:asm.v1">
  <dependentAssembly>
    <assemblyIdentity name="a.dll"
                      publicKeyToken="{put a.dll publicKeytoken here}"
                      culture="neutral" />
    <bindingRedirect oldVersion="0.0.0.0-99.99.99.99"
                     newVersion="4.0.0.0"/>
  </dependentAssembly>
  <dependentAssembly>
    <assemblyIdentity name="b.dll"
                      publicKeyToken="{put b.dll publicKeytoken here}"
                      culture="neutral" />
    <bindingRedirect oldVersion="0.0.0.0-99.99.99.99"
                     newVersion="4.0.0.0"/>
  </dependentAssembly>
</assemblyBinding>

Also, go to the references of your application, right click the a.dll and b.dll, go to properties and check if "Specific Version" is set to False.

Hope it helps.

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