25

I'm trying to create a script to go through an index, look at each page number, and tell me what chapter of the book that entry is in. Here's an approximation of what I'm doing:

@chapters = {
  1 => "introduction.xhtml",
  2..5 => "chapter1.xhtml",
  6..10 => "chapter2.xhtml",
  11..18 => "chapter3.xhtml",
  19..30 => "chapter4.xhtml" }

def find_chapter(number)
  @chapters.each do |page_range, chapter_name|
    if number === page_range
      puts "<a href=\"" + chapter_name + "\page" + number.to_s + "\">" + number.to_s + </a>"
    end
  end
end

find_chapter(1) will spit out the string I want, but find_chapter(15) doesn't return anything. Is it not possible to use a range as a key like this?

1
  • You can use anything with a functioning hash method as a key, and since this is defined in Object, you'd almost have to go out of your way to find an object that can't be used as a key.
    – tadman
    Jul 8 '13 at 19:24
37

You can use a range for Hash keys and you can look up keys very easily using select like this:

@chapters = { 1 => "introduction.xhtml", 2..5 => "chapter1.xhtml", 
              6..10 => "chapter2.xhtml", 11..18 => "chapter3.xhtml",                                         
              19..30 => "chapter4.xhtml" } 

@chapters.select {|chapter| chapter === 5 }
 #=> {2..5=>"chapter1.xhtml"} 

If you only want the chapter name, just add .values.first like this:

@chapters.select {|chapter| chapter === 9 }.values.first
 #=> "chapter2.xhtml" 
2
  • 1
    I like this answer the best - seems the most idiomatic. +1
    – jpalm
    May 10 '14 at 16:57
  • 20
    Try out @chapters.detect{|k,v| k === 5}.last because, unlike select, detect will stop iterating at the first match.
    – genkilabs
    Jul 31 '14 at 16:41
9

Here's a concise way of returning just the value of the first matching key:

# setup
i = 17; 
hash = { 1..10 => :a, 11..20 => :b, 21..30 => :c }; 

# find key
hash.find { |k, v| break v if k.cover? i }
7

Sure, just reverse the comparison

if page_range === number

Like this

@chapters = {
  1 => "introduction.xhtml",
  2..5 => "chapter1.xhtml",
  6..10 => "chapter2.xhtml",
  11..18 => "chapter3.xhtml",
  19..30 => "chapter4.xhtml" }

def find_chapter(number)
  @chapters.each do |page_range, chapter_name|
    if page_range === number
      puts chapter_name
    end
  end
end

find_chapter(1)
find_chapter(15)
# >> introduction.xhtml
# >> chapter3.xhtml

It works this way because === method on Range has special behaviour: Range#===. If you place number first, then Fixnum#=== is called, which compares values numerically. Range isn't a number, so they don't match.

4
  • Algorithmically speaking this is probably a whole lot slower than just expanding the ranges into multiple keys referencing the same value.
    – tadman
    Jul 8 '13 at 19:25
  • @tadman: probably. This needs to be measured. And it depends, of course, on how large your ranges are :) (expansion might cost you a lot of RAM) Jul 8 '13 at 19:26
  • Most people don't have millions of book chapters, but your point is an important thing to note.
    – tadman
    Jul 9 '13 at 13:57
  • There's also more bookkeeping to do and a higher potential for error if you expand the ranges. Apr 29 '14 at 0:29
7

As @Sergio Tulentsev demonstrates, it can be done. The usual way to do this however is by using a case when . It is a bit more flexible because you can execute code in the then clause and you can use an else part handling everything unhandled . It uses the same === method under the hood.

def find_chapter(number)
  title = case number
    when 1      then "introduction.xhtml"
    when 2..5   then "chapter1.xhtml"
    when 6..10  then "chapter2.xhtml"
    when 11..18 then "chapter3.xhtml"
    when 19..30 then "chapter4.xhtml"
    else "chapter unknown"
  end
  #optionally: do something with title
end
4

Found a forum on this topic. They suggest

class RangedHash
  def initialize(hash)
    @ranges = hash
  end

  def [](key)
    @ranges.each do |range, value|
      return value if range.include?(key)
    end
    nil
  end
end

Now you can use it like

ranges = RangedHash.new(
  1..10 => 'low',
  21..30 => 'medium',
  41..50 => 'high'
)
ranges[5]  #=> "low"
ranges[15] #=> nil
ranges[25] #=> "medium"
2

Try out this:

def find_chapter(page_number)
  @chapters.select{ |chapters_key| chapters_key === page_number.to_i}.values.first
end

Then you simply call it like so:

find_chapter(10)
=> "chapter2.xhtml"


find_chapter(40)
=> nil
1
  • Generally, answers are much more helpful if they include an explanation of what the code is intended to do, and why that solves the problem without introducing others. May 25 '18 at 10:41

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