408

I can't get past the error:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "C:\Users\Dom\Desktop\test\test.py", line 7, in <module>
    p = Pump.getPumps()
TypeError: getPumps() missing 1 required positional argument: 'self'

I examined several tutorials but there doesn't seem to be anything different from my code. The only thing I can think of is that Python 3.3 requires different syntax.

class Pump:

    def __init__(self):
        print("init") # never prints

    def getPumps(self):
        # Open database connection
        # some stuff here that never gets executed because of error
        pass  # dummy code

p = Pump.getPumps()

print(p)

If I understand correctly, self is passed to the constructor and methods automatically. What am I doing wrong here?

8 Answers 8

537

You need to instantiate a class instance here.

Use

p = Pump()
p.getPumps()

Small example -

>>> class TestClass:
        def __init__(self):
            print("in init")
        def testFunc(self):
            print("in Test Func")


>>> testInstance = TestClass()
in init
>>> testInstance.testFunc()
in Test Func
0
96

You need to initialize it first:

p = Pump().getPumps()
0
20

Works and is simpler than every other solution I see here :

Pump().getPumps()

This is great if you don't need to reuse a class instance. Tested on Python 3.7.3.

1
  • 3
    This is practically a duplicate of JBernardo's answer. Note that he also doesn't save the instance, unless getPumps() returns self, which would be bizarre.
    – wjandrea
    Dec 31, 2020 at 4:18
10

The self keyword in Python is analogous to this keyword in C++ / Java / C#.

In Python 2 it is done implicitly by the compiler (yes Python does compilation internally). It's just that in Python 3 you need to mention it explicitly in the constructor and member functions. example:

class Pump():
    # member variable
    # account_holder
    # balance_amount

    # constructor
    def __init__(self,ah,bal):
        self.account_holder = ah
        self.balance_amount = bal

    def getPumps(self):
        print("The details of your account are:"+self.account_number + self.balance_amount)

# object = class(*passing values to constructor*)
p = Pump("Tahir",12000)
p.getPumps()
4
  • 2
    It's not a keyword, just a convention.
    – wjandrea
    Jul 30, 2020 at 19:17
  • 1
    What do you mean by "In Python 2 it is done implicitly by the compiler"? AFAIK Python 2 never set self implicitly.
    – wjandrea
    Jul 30, 2020 at 19:17
  • This is not valid Python code. What are you trying to demonstrate exactly? To start, Python comments use #, not //; you don't need to declare member attributes at the class-level; and those pipes seem to be out-of-place.
    – wjandrea
    Dec 31, 2020 at 4:16
  • 1
    "In Python 2 it is done implicitly by the compiler" citation needed.
    – Sören
    Apr 22, 2022 at 20:55
8

You can call the method like pump.getPumps(). By adding @classmethod decorator on the method. A class method receives the class as the implicit first argument, just like an instance method receives the instance.

class Pump:

def __init__(self):
    print ("init") # never prints

@classmethod
def getPumps(cls):
            # Open database connection
            # some stuff here that never gets executed because of error

So, simply call Pump.getPumps() .

In java, it is termed as static method.

1
4

You can also get this error by prematurely taking PyCharm's advice to annotate a method @staticmethod. Remove the annotation.

1

I got the same error below:

TypeError: test() missing 1 required positional argument: 'self'

When an instance method had self, then I called it directly by class name as shown below:

class Person:
    def test(self): # <- With "self" 
        print("Test")

Person.test() # Here

And, when a static method had self, then I called it by object or directly by class name as shown below:

class Person:
    @staticmethod
    def test(self): # <- With "self" 
        print("Test")

obj = Person()
obj.test() # Here

# Or

Person.test() # Here

So, I called the instance method with object as shown below:

class Person:
    def test(self): # <- With "self" 
        print("Test")

obj = Person()
obj.test() # Here

And, I removed self from the static method as shown below:

class Person:
    @staticmethod
    def test(): # <- "self" removed 
        print("Test")

obj = Person()
obj.test() # Here

# Or

Person.test() # Here

Then, the error was solved:

Test

In detail, I explain about instance method in my answer for What is an "instance method" in Python? and also explain about @staticmethod and @classmethod in my answer for @classmethod vs @staticmethod in Python.

0

If skipping parentheses for the object declaration (typo), then exactly this error occurs.

# WRONG! will result in TypeError: getPumps() missing 1 required positional argument: 'self'
p = Pump
p.getPumps()

Do not forget the parentheses for the Pump object

# CORRECT!
p = Pump()
p.getPumps()

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