444

I have some code like:

class Pump:    
    def __init__(self):
        print("init")

    def getPumps(self):
        pass

p = Pump.getPumps()
print(p)

But I get an error like:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "C:\Users\Dom\Desktop\test\test.py", line 7, in <module>
    p = Pump.getPumps()
TypeError: getPumps() missing 1 required positional argument: 'self'

Why doesn't __init__ seem to be called, and what does this exception mean? My understanding is that self is passed to the constructor and methods automatically. What am I doing wrong here?

10 Answers 10

582

To use the class, first create an instance, like so:

p = Pump()
p.getPumps()

A full example:

>>> class TestClass:
...     def __init__(self):
...         print("init")
...     def testFunc(self):
...         print("Test Func")
... 
>>> testInstance = TestClass()
init
>>> testInstance.testFunc()
Test Func
0
100

You need to initialize it first:

p = Pump().getPumps()
0
11

Adding a @classmethod decorator to the method allows for calling it like Pump.getPumps().

A class method receives the class as the implicit first argument, just like an instance method receives the instance.

class Pump:
    def __init__(self):
        print("init")

    @classmethod
    def getPumps(cls):
        pass
0
8

The self keyword in Python is analogous to this keyword in C++ / Java / C#.

In Python 2 it is done implicitly by the compiler (yes Python does compilation internally). It's just that in Python 3 you need to mention it explicitly in the constructor and member functions. example:

class Pump():
    # member variable
    # account_holder
    # balance_amount

    # constructor
    def __init__(self,ah,bal):
        self.account_holder = ah
        self.balance_amount = bal

    def getPumps(self):
        print("The details of your account are:"+self.account_number + self.balance_amount)

# object = class(*passing values to constructor*)
p = Pump("Tahir",12000)
p.getPumps()
5
  • 3
    It's not a keyword, just a convention.
    – wjandrea
    Jul 30, 2020 at 19:17
  • 4
    What do you mean by "In Python 2 it is done implicitly by the compiler"? AFAIK Python 2 never set self implicitly.
    – wjandrea
    Jul 30, 2020 at 19:17
  • This is not valid Python code. What are you trying to demonstrate exactly? To start, Python comments use #, not //; you don't need to declare member attributes at the class-level; and those pipes seem to be out-of-place.
    – wjandrea
    Dec 31, 2020 at 4:16
  • 2
    "In Python 2 it is done implicitly by the compiler" citation needed.
    – Sören
    Apr 22, 2022 at 20:55
  • 1
    There are many differences between Python 2.x and Python 3.x, even some that concern how classes work. This, however, is absolutely not one of them. Aside from that, the problem was nothing to do with explicit self. The problem is simply about instantiating the class. Feb 18, 2023 at 20:16
6

You can also get this error by prematurely taking PyCharm's advice to annotate a method @staticmethod. Remove the annotation.

1
  • Another possibility in the neighborhood of this answer is if you declare a method as an @staticmethod and then include (or retain) self as the first positional argument..
    – DaveL17
    May 3, 2023 at 1:04
2

Remember 2 points

  1. While defining the class do not enclose the class name by () bracket.

    class Pump:    
    def __init__(self):
    
  2. Also while instantiating class by object do not forget to use () bracket. Because only then above error is displayed.

  • If you want to call method without instantiating the object then inline instantiating Pump().getPumps()

  • But ideally best practice is to instantiate the object with short key and then use that object instantiated to call the methods of the class, like

     p = Pump()
     p.getPumps()
    
1

If skipping parentheses for the object declaration (typo), then exactly this error occurs.

# WRONG! will result in TypeError: getPumps() missing 1 required positional argument: 'self'
p = Pump
p.getPumps()

Do not forget the parentheses for the Pump object

# CORRECT!
p = Pump()
p.getPumps()
1
1

I got the same error below:

TypeError: test() missing 1 required positional argument: 'self'

When an instance method had self, then I called it directly by class name as shown below:

class Person:
    def test(self): # <- With "self" 
        print("Test")

Person.test() # Here

And, when a static method had self, then I called it by object or directly by class name as shown below:

class Person:
    @staticmethod
    def test(self): # <- With "self" 
        print("Test")

obj = Person()
obj.test() # Here

# Or

Person.test() # Here

So, I called the instance method with object as shown below:

class Person:
    def test(self): # <- With "self" 
        print("Test")

obj = Person()
obj.test() # Here

And, I removed self from the static method as shown below:

class Person:
    @staticmethod
    def test(): # <- "self" removed 
        print("Test")

obj = Person()
obj.test() # Here

# Or

Person.test() # Here

Then, the error was solved:

Test

In detail, I explain about instance method in my answer for What is an "instance method" in Python? and also explain about @staticmethod and @classmethod in my answer for @classmethod vs @staticmethod in Python.

1

This error may also be raised if a required positional argument for a function is not passed. For example the following triggers the error.

def func(value, *args, **kwargs):
    pass

func()            # <--- TypeError: func() missing 1 required positional argument: 'value'
func(a=1, b=2)    # <--- TypeError: func() missing 1 required positional argument: 'value'

# passing the required arg solves the issue
func(30)          # <--- OK
func(3, a=1, b=2) # <--- OK

The above example is very simple but if func() was imported from a module, it would be less obvious. For example, numpy module's allclose function (which checks if two arrays are close enough) expects two positional arguments. If you pass the two arrays as a tuple/list, you'll get the TypeError in the title.

import numpy as np
np.allclose(([1, 2], [1, 1]))  # <--- TypeError
np.allclose([1, 2], [1, 1])    # <--- OK
0

BEFORE

 class Person:
        def __init__(self, full_name, uuid, user_type, working_hours=None):
            self.full_name = full_name
            self.uuid = uuid
    
        def load_data(filename):
            print("Data")
           
        
        def load_readers(self):
            return self.load_data("readers.txt")

   

AFTER

class Person:
        def __init__(self, full_name, uuid, user_type):
            self.full_name = full_name
            self.uuid = uuid
            self.user_type = user_type
    
        def load_data(self, filename):
            print("Data")
           
        
        def load_readers(self):
            return self.load_data("readers.txt")

In my situation, the error was caused by a missing self keyword in the load_data() function, which was used in the load_readers() function.

Try to check if all your functions have the self keyword

HOW I CALLED THE CLASS

if __name__ == '__main__':
        person = Person("Foo", 1222, "READER")
        print(person.load_readers())

So instead of using the class name, first initiate the class object to call the function.

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