31

Is it possible to declare some function type func_t which returns that type, func_t?

In other words, is it possible for a function to return itself?

// func_t is declared as some sort of function pointer
func_t foo(void *arg)
{
  return &foo;
}

Or would I have to use void * and typecasting?

  • 2
    @Baratong Imagine implementing a state machine where each state is represented by a function. The function, upon processing the state, returns a function with the new state. This would require declaring a function that returns its own type, something that is AFAIK impossible in C. – user4815162342 Jul 8 '13 at 22:02
  • @user4815162342 yes it is possible, see my answer for details. – Roland Sep 20 '16 at 16:10
17

No, you cannot declare recursive function types in C. Except inside a structure (or an union), it's not possible to declare a recursive type in C.

Now for the void * solution, void * is only guaranteed to hold pointers to objects and not pointers to functions. Being able to convert function pointers and void * is available only as an extension.

| improve this answer | |
  • What if he used function forward declaration? – Lews Therin Jul 8 '13 at 21:46
  • That's what I was thinking, but I'm not sure how to do that – Drew McGowen Jul 8 '13 at 21:47
  • @LewsTherin I don't know how it would help. Any example? – ouah Jul 8 '13 at 21:52
  • 6
    For what it's worth, in the usual "state machine with function pointer for doing state machine advance" set-up, you can have a function that returns a struct state_machine object in which there is a pointer-to-function has type struct state_machine (*fp)(args). A function foo can then "return itself" with: struct state_machine ret; ret.fp = foo; ... return ret; – torek Jul 9 '13 at 5:49
  • 3
    How about adding that all function pointer types are round-trip convertible? – Deduplicator Jul 30 '14 at 14:49
16

A possible solution with structs:

struct func_wrap
{
    struct func_wrap (*func)(void);
};

struct func_wrap func_test(void)
{
    struct func_wrap self;

    self.func = func_test;
    return self;
}

Compiling with gcc -Wall gave no warnings, but I'm not sure if this is 100% portable.

| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    Compile with -pedantic to warn about using non standard features. – Chris Mar 17 '14 at 20:19
  • 1
    @Chris compiles with gcc -Wall -Werror -Wextra -pedantic -c func.c -std=c89 w/o problem. – panzi Jul 27 '14 at 19:56
  • 2
    This is brilliant, no casting at all, clean types! Should be the preferred answer since this provides not only explanations but a proper solution. I like the C++-way of passing around function objects (kind of...)! – minastaros Apr 9 '19 at 9:35
4

You can't cast function pointers to void* (they can be different sizes), but that's not a problem since we can cast to another function pointer type and cast it back to get the original value.

typedef void (*fun2)();
typedef fun2 (*fun1)();

fun2 rec_fun()
{
    puts("Called a function");
    return (fun2)rec_fun;
}

// later in code...
fun1 fp = (fun1)((fun1)rec_fun())();
fp();

Output:

Called a function
Called a function
Called a function
| improve this answer | |
  • Casting function pointers to void * is an extension: it's recognised by the standard as working on almost all real-world compilers, even if the standard doesn't demand it. It is not forbidden or undefined, so "can't" is the wrong word. – Leushenko Jul 8 '13 at 23:29
  • 4
    @Leushenko "even if the standard doesn't demand it" stop right here: if the C standard doesn't demand something (that is, doesn't define it) the behaviour is undefined, therefore you can't. (I checked it - C standard doesn't define conversions from function pointers to data pointers). If converting works in your code, then you aren't writing C - you're writing in its superset (which isn't C) – milleniumbug Jul 9 '13 at 0:24
  • @Leushenko To my knowledge, the only guarantee about function pointer conversions in C99 is “A pointer to a function of one type may be converted to a pointer to a function of another type and back again; the result shall compare equal to the original pointer. If a converted pointer is used to call a function whose type is not compatible with the pointed-to type, the behavior is undefined” (6.3.2.3:8). Where does the C99 standard “recognise” conversions to void *? – Pascal Cuoq Jul 9 '13 at 0:55
  • @Leushenko Also, anything that is not defined is undefined: “Undefined behavior is otherwise indicated in this International Standard by the words ‘‘undefined behavior’’ or by the omission of any explicit definition of behavior” (4:2) – Pascal Cuoq Jul 9 '13 at 0:56
  • J.5.7: A pointer to an object or to void may be cast to a pointer to a function, allowing data to be invoked as a function (6.5.4). A pointer to a function may be cast to a pointer to an object or to void, allowing a function to be inspected or modified (for example, by a debugger) (6.5.4). C99 and C11. – Leushenko Jul 9 '13 at 2:26
3

In other words, is it possible for a function to return itself?

It depends on what you mean by "itself"; if you mean a pointer to itself then the answer is yes! While it is not possible for a function to return its type a function can return a pointer to itself and this pointer can then be converted to the appropriate type before calling.

The details are explained in the question comp.lang.c faq: Function that can return a pointer to a function of the same type.

Check my answer for details.

| improve this answer | |
1

Assume the function definition

T f(void)
{
  return &f;
}

f() returns a value of type T, but the type of the expression &f is "pointer to function returning T". It doesn't matter what T is, the expression &f will always be of a different, incompatible type T (*)(void). Even if T is a pointer-to-function type such as Q (*)(void), the expression &f will wind up being "pointer-to-function-returning-pointer-to-function", or Q (*(*)(void))(void).

If T is an integral type that's large enough to hold a function pointer value and conversion from T (*)(void) to T and back to T (*)(void) is meaningful on your platform, you might be able to get away with something like

T f(void)
{ 
  return (T) &f;
}

but I can think of at least a couple of situations where that won't work at all. And honestly, its utility would be extremely limited compared to using something like a lookup table.

C just wasn't designed to treat functions like any other data item, and pointers to functions aren't interchangeable with pointers to object types.

| improve this answer | |
  • If you insist on downvoting, at least tell me why so I can fix whatever you think the error is. – John Bode Nov 18 '13 at 12:36
0

what about something like this:

typedef void* (*takesDoubleReturnsVoidPtr)(double);

void* functionB(double d)
{
    printf("here is a function %f",d);
    return NULL;
}

takesDoubleReturnsVoidPtr functionA()
{
    return functionB;
}

int main(int argc, const char * argv[])
{
    takesDoubleReturnsVoidPtr func = functionA();
    func(56.7);
    return 0;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • you could have something return functionA... but you already know the address of that, you just called it. – Grady Player Jul 8 '13 at 21:58
  • the point of being able to return functionA is it may return that or it may return something else, i.e. if (someCondition) return functionA else return functionB; – Drew McGowen Jul 8 '13 at 22:12
  • well In Objective C there is something analogousish typedef id (*IMP)(id, SEL, ...); since IMP returns an abstract object id which can then contain its own IMP's so you could take a object oriented approach. – Grady Player Jul 8 '13 at 22:32
0
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdint.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

typedef void *(*fptr)(int *);
void *start (int *);
void *stop (int *);
void *start (int *a) {
         printf("%s\n", __func__);
         return stop(a);
}
void *stop (int *a) {
         printf("%s\n", __func__);
         return start(a);
}
int main (void) {
         int a = 10;
         fptr f = start;
         f(&a);
         return 0;
}
| improve this answer | |
-1

There's a way, you just try this:

typedef void *(*FuncPtr)();

void *f() { return f; }

int main() {
    FuncPtr f1 = f();
    FuncPtr f2 = f1();
    FuncPtr f3 = f2();
    return 0;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • The conversion from void * to a function pointer is not standard - and definitely not implicit. – Antti Haapala Feb 12 '18 at 15:30
-2

If you were using C++, you could create a State object type (presuming the state machine example usage) wherein you declare an operator() that returns a State object type by reference or pointer. You can then define each state as a derived class of State that returns each appropriate other derived types from its implementation of operator().

| improve this answer | |
  • 13
    Or if he was using OCaml, the OP could use option -rectypes to get the system to accept the definition let rec f () = f ;;, the type of which would be inferred as unit -> 'a as 'a. But since he neither tagged the question C++ nor OCaml, we are not really helping, are we? – Pascal Cuoq Jul 9 '13 at 1:13

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