12

I created a pre-commit script for git, which is working fine when run via command line. Here's that script:

#!/bin/sh
#
# Pre-commit hooks
echo "Running unit tests..."

# Lint stuff before commiting
grunt runtests
RESULT=$?

[ $RESULT -ne 0 ] && echo "Tests (or tasks) failed, aborting the commit" && exit 1

echo "All tests passed, commiting your changes" && exit 0

I'd would like the pre-commit to also work via the GitHub client application, but I can't get that working. The pre-commit script is executed, but it throws an error. Here's the full text it returns in the client alert window:

Running unit tests...
.git/hooks/pre-commit: line 7: grunt: command not found
Tests (or tasks) failed, aborting the commit
 (1)

For some reason, it is not able to find grunt. I've reinstalled the grunt cli again and used the global '-g' flag, but that made no difference. Any ideas how I can get the client to find grunt?

5 Answers 5

24

GUI apps on OS X doesn't load the stuff in .bashrc/.bash_profile, which means they won't have user specified $PATH additions like /usr/local/bin, which is where the grunt binary is. You can either specify the full path or fix the $PATH in your pre-commit hook, by adding this after the top comments: PATH="/usr/local/bin:$PATH"

3
  • I had similar problem while running pre-commit hook with SourceTree. Terminal was running 'grunt test' from pre-commit, but not SourceTree. Thanks..! it worked. Oct 1, 2014 at 22:15
  • If this isn't working for you, you are trying to use node modules, and you have Node Version Manager installed, see the answer here for the code that will allow the $PATH to find your node modules, I also added it below as another answer to this question.
    – RustyToms
    Apr 12, 2017 at 14:02
  • Got haunted by VSCode git command error ('git-lfs' not found in path) every time git hook triggers even if in terminal git-lfs is clearly available)...turns out this is the reason; if I start VSCode by code . from terminal, then PATH gets loaded properly and git-lfs runs in hook. But if launching VSCode from Finder/Spotlight, the git hook PATH looks weirdly short, which matches the behavior this answer describes. Seems like this cause lots of confusion for ppl using git GUI or VSCode even if they got things installed.
    – Shawn
    Mar 24, 2022 at 1:04
13

If you are using sourcetree (on Mac) and you have pre-commit and pre-push hooks, open sourcetree with command line instead of opening it directly, with following command.

open /Applications/SourceTree.app/Contents/MacOS/SourceTree

Now your hooks will work when you try to commit and push. I am sure it work for github app as well.

8
  • 1
    WOW. This is messed up. Did you report this bug to Atlassian? Sep 6, 2016 at 13:44
  • 3
    In the newer version of source tree, it just works. No need to open use the above hack Dec 11, 2016 at 18:08
  • @AamirAfridi, it's not just working for me on the newest version of SourceTree. I still need to open from the command line. Jan 12, 2017 at 16:57
  • 1
    Mojave and latest source tree 4.0.1 (234). Not working without the hack.
    – BigMan73
    Feb 5, 2020 at 16:40
1

If you want to run a script that gets your environment ($PATH, etc) you should change the first line of your script from this:

#!/bin/sh

to:

#!/usr/bin/env sh

Then call grunt without the hard coded path.

This way if the path to your executable changes in the future or is different on other machines the script will still work. /usr/bin/env will get the environment of the user that the script is running as. This is really helpful in places where some people use different package managers but need to run the same scripts. Otherwise you could end up with a lot of logic looking for applications that could've been avoided by depending on a properly populated $PATH.

1
  • @coding_idiot You can also try changing sh to bash to see if that picks up your path. I've only used bash like this but I put sh in there because it was the shell you were originally using. Jan 7, 2016 at 13:00
0

Sindre Sorhus' excellent answer:

GUI apps on OS X doesn't load the stuff in .bashrc/.bash_profile, which means they won't have user specified $PATH additions like /usr/local/bin, which is where the grunt binary is. You can either specify the full path or fix the $PATH in your pre-commit hook, by adding this after the top comments: PATH="/usr/local/bin:$PATH"

In my case this did not work because I am using Node Version Manager, which stores different versions of Node and makes it easy to upgrade and switch Node versions. It stores your Node modules for each version of Node in a separate file. Here is the code I used to get around this problem:

#!/usr/bin/env bash

PATH="/usr/local/bin:$PATH"

if [ -f $HOME/.nvm/nvm.sh ]
then
  . $HOME/.nvm/nvm.sh
  PATH="$HOME/.nvm/versions/node/$(nvm current)/bin:$PATH"
fi

This checks for NVM, and if it exists, loads it and uses it to find the path to the node modules for the currently used version of Node.

1
  • 1
    Where should this code be located? How/When is it launched?
    – sompylasar
    Aug 31, 2017 at 22:22
-1

as a simple workaround specifying the full absolute path to grunt should work. if you need more of your environment to be set up you need to investigate how the github application builds the environment for the hooks.

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