Recently, I'm trying to approach semantic web using Jena to create RDF and make query. Now, I have successfully made a owl based RDF file in Jena. However, when I trying to use different ontologies (such as: cidoc-crm), I do not know how to import those ontologies to Jena. Does anyone know how to import them to Jena? Do I need to create a new ontology model?

  • 2
    Can you clarify what you mean by the cidoc-crm ontology? I see that there is an RDFS encoding available from the releases section, but only drafts of OWL DL ontologies. The way that you would handle these two cases is different. If you're working in pure RDF(S), you only need to use the vocabulary defined in the RDFS vocabulary. If you're working with OWL, then your ontology needs to import the other ontology. – Joshua Taylor Jul 9 '13 at 12:55
  • thanks for the reply, now I have a bit of confused, I would like to use cidoc-crm in jena making a RDF file to describe a collection in museums and art gallery. Is cidoc-CRM a " domain ontology" like Dublin Core or just vocabularies? – Richard Jul 11 '13 at 10:14
  • 3
    @Richard you seem to have your terminology a bit mixed up. CIDOC-CRM is a domain ontology, yes - it's an ontology for the Cultural Heritage domain. Dublin Core is not a domain ontology: instead, it's a cross-domain vocabulary (cross-domain meaning that it is applicable to many different types of domain, not just "Cultural Heritage" or "Medical", or...). – Jeen Broekstra Jul 15 '13 at 4:52
  • 3
    Also, the difference between a vocabulary and an ontology is not an absolute one, but rather a sliding scale: any ontology is a vocabulary, but only vocabularies that are sufficiently expressive and structured are usually called ontologies. Dublin Core, which is not very structured (the basis is simply a list of useful properties, but no class structure/hierarchy of any sort) is not typically considered a proper ontology - although it's at least partly personal taste as well. – Jeen Broekstra Jul 15 '13 at 4:54

Jena's OntModel interface provides a convenient way of working with ontologies (including RDFS ontologies). The following code shows how you can get an OntModel that contains the data of the ontology. In this code, I then create another OntModel with inference support that includes the CIDOC model that I created. With the inferencing model, it is easy to create individuals and see computed types for them, or see subclass relationships derived by the inference model.

import com.hp.hpl.jena.ontology.Individual;
import com.hp.hpl.jena.ontology.OntClass;
import com.hp.hpl.jena.ontology.OntModel;
import com.hp.hpl.jena.ontology.OntModelSpec;
import com.hp.hpl.jena.rdf.model.ModelFactory;
import com.hp.hpl.jena.rdf.model.Resource;
import com.hp.hpl.jena.util.iterator.ExtendedIterator;

public class CIDOCExample {

    final static String CIDOCNS = "http://www.cidoc-crm.org/cidoc-crm/";

    public static void main( String[] args ) {
        // Load the CIDOC-CRM into an OntModel.  We won't add any reasoning capability to this model, but
        // we'll use it as a submodel of OntModels that do.  Jena can pull the document from the web, but
        // you could also download a local copy and read that.  It would certainly a bit quicker than 
        // downloading it every time.
        final OntModel cidocModel = ModelFactory.createOntologyModel( OntModelSpec.RDFS_MEM );
        cidocModel.read( "http://www.cidoc-crm.org/rdfs/cidoc_crm_v5.1-draft-2013May.rdfs" );

        // Create an OntModel that imports the cidocModel, and give it inference support.
        final OntModel model = ModelFactory.createOntologyModel( OntModelSpec.RDFS_MEM_RDFS_INF );
        model.addSubModel( cidocModel );

        // Retrieve a class from the OntModel and shows its subclasses.
        final OntClass e5_event = model.getOntClass( CIDOCNS+"E5_Event" );
        System.out.println( "Subclasses of E5_Event:" );
        for ( final ExtendedIterator<OntClass> it = e5_event.listSubClasses(); it.hasNext() ;) {
            System.out.println( "\t* "+it.next() );
        }

        // Create your own instance data in an OntModel that imports the cidocModel
        final Individual someJoining = model.createIndividual( "http://example.org/someJoining", cidocModel.getOntClass( CIDOCNS+"E85_Joining"));
        System.out.println( "Types of "+someJoining );
        for ( final ExtendedIterator<Resource> types = someJoining.listRDFTypes(false); types.hasNext(); ) {
            System.out.println( "\t* "+types.next() );
        }
    }
}

Having to obtain the classes using OntModel.getOntClass(CIDCOCNS+"...") is a bit clumsy, and it's very easy to make a typo. Jena provides an excellent schemagen tool that takes an ontology and generates a class of constants that represent the classes, properties, and individuals declared in the ontology. For instance, you could use schemagen to create a CIDOC class with, e.g., a constant OntClass object for E5_Event so that instead of

final OntClass e5_event = model.getOntClass( CIDOCNS+"E5_Event" );
System.out.println( "Subclasses of E5_Event:" );
for ( final ExtendedIterator<OntClass> it = e5_event.listSubClasses(); it.hasNext() ;) {
  System.out.println( "\t* "+it.next() );
}

you could do

System.out.println( "Subclasses of E5_Event:" );
for ( final ExtendedIterator<OntClass> it = CIDOC.E5_Event.inModel( model ).listSubClasses(); it.hasNext() ;) {
  System.out.println( "\t* "+it.next() );
}
  • Thank you, this helped me so much! – Obererpel Mar 14 '17 at 17:42

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.