12

I do have two $scope variables. They are called $scope.image and $scope.titleimage.

Basically the store the same type of contents. I want to track now when either one of them gets updated. But so far I could not figure out how to have two variables tracked in a single $scope.$watch() callback.

// How can I watch titleimage here as well?
$scope.$watch('image', function(media) {
    console.log('Media change discoverd!');
}); 
3
31

$watch method accepts a function as first parameter (beside a string). $watch will "observe" the return value of the function and call the $watch listener if return value is changed.

$scope.$watch(
  function(scope){
    return {image: scope.image, titleImage: scope.titleImage};
  }, 
  function(images, oldImages) {
    if(oldImages.image !== images.image){
      console.log('Image changed');
    }
    if(oldImages.titleImage !== images.titleImage){
      console.log('titleImage changed');
    }
  }, 
  true
); 

Also you might observe a concatenated value, but that doesn't let you know which one of the observed values actually changed:

$scope.$watch('image + titleImage',
  function(newVal, oldVal) {
    console.log('One of the images have changed');
  }
); 

And you can also watch an array of scope variables:

$scope.$watch('[image, titleImage]',
  function(images, oldImages) {
    if(oldImages[0] !== images[0]){
      console.log('Image changed');
    }
    if(oldImages[1] !== oldImages[1]){
      console.log('titleImage changed');
    }
  },
  true
); 
4
  • 2
    Don't you mean oldImages.titleImage !== images.titleImage? (You have oldImages twice.)
    – Trojan
    Aug 8 '15 at 2:24
  • The first approach of returning an object is the best! clean and simple Sep 3 '15 at 14:39
  • I almost didn't see the little true parameter in the bottom on your first example. That makes the comparison between old and new objects a deep comparison. Worked fine after adding that :) May 1 '18 at 8:06
  • @Trojan I edited, but not yet reflecting...waiting for peer review
    – Thinking
    Aug 15 '20 at 1:38
16

Stewie's suggestions will work. But there are a thousand ways to skin this cat. I'd submit that if you're watching two separate values, there's nothing wrong with setting up two watches for them with a shared function between them:

functional programming to the rescue!

Using functions to create functions is awesome.

function logChange(expr) {
   return function(newVal, oldVal) {
      console.log(expr+ ' has changed from ' + oldVal + ' to ' + newVal);
   };
}

$scope.$watch('image', logChange('image'));
$scope.$watch('titleImage', logChange('titleImage'));

OR... you could even wrap the watch setup in it's own function (much less exciting, IMO):

function logChanges(expr) {
   $scope.$watch(expr, function(newVal, oldVal) {
      console.log(expr+ ' has changed from ' + oldVal + ' to ' + newVal);
   });
};

logChanges('image');
logChanges('titleImage');

.. but I have a thousand of them, you say?

//assuming the second function above
angular.forEach(['image', 'titleimage', 'hockeypuck', 'kitchensink'], logChanges);
0
0

Use computed and return multiple variables in an array that you want to listen to that should execute the same function.

computed: {
  photo () {
    return [this.image, this.title]
  }
},
watch: {
  photo () {
    console.log('changed')
  }
},
0

The correct answer was found here:

https://docs.angularjs.org/api/ng/type/$rootScope.Scope#$watchCollection

"for arrays, this implies watching the array items; for object maps, this implies watching the properties"

Example:

$scope.$watchCollection(function () {
    return {t : ctrl.time, d : ctrl.date};
}, function(value) {
    ctrl.updateDateTime();
});

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.