179

So in Python and Ruby there is the splat operator (*) for unpacking an array as arguments. In Javascript there is the .apply() function. Is there a way of unpacking an array/slice as function arguments in Go? Any resources for this would be great as well!

Something along the lines of this:

func my_func(a, b int) (int) {
    return a + b
}

func main() {
    arr := []int{2,4}
    sum := my_func(arr)
}
1
  • 15
    First of all, arr is not an array. It is a slice.
    – newacct
    Jul 10, 2013 at 2:25

4 Answers 4

274

You can use a vararg syntax similar to C:

package main
import "fmt"

func my_func( args ...int) int {
   sum := 0
   for _,v := range args {
      sum = sum + v
   }

   return sum;
}

func main() {
    arr := []int{2,4}
    sum := my_func(arr...)
    fmt.Println("Sum is ", sum)
}

Now you can sum as many things as you'd like. Notice the important ... after when you call the my_func function.

Running example: http://ideone.com/8htWfx

3
  • 1
    ... works for slices. Do we have something similar for type array?
    – Yogesh
    May 7, 2021 at 16:29
  • 5
    @Yogesh I may be a bit late, but you could always do something like arr := [3]int{1, 2, 3}; my_func(arr[:]...), which turns it into a slice and then unpacks it. Oct 26, 2021 at 21:32
  • 8
    how we can handle that when function expect ...interface{} and our slice is another type Apr 23, 2022 at 18:44
19

Either your function is varargs, in which you can use a slice with the ... notation as Hunter McMillen shows, or your function has a fixed number of arguments and you can unpack them when writing your code.

If you really want to do this dynamically on a function of fixed number of arguments, you can use reflection:

package main
import "fmt"
import "reflect"

func my_func(a, b int) (int) {
    return a + b
}

func main() {
    arr := []int{2,4}
    var args []reflect.Value
    for _, x := range arr {
        args = append(args, reflect.ValueOf(x))
    }
    fun := reflect.ValueOf(my_func)
    result := fun.Call(args)
    sum := result[0].Interface().(int)
    fmt.Println("Sum is ", sum)
}
6
  • I'm curious to see how this benchmarks against the varargs approach. I would assume it would perform less efficiently, but I'll have to look into it. Jul 10, 2013 at 3:24
  • @HunterMcMillen did you get any insight about performance comparison?
    – AkiRoss
    Sep 14, 2015 at 14:45
  • @AkiRoss probably, but it was so long ago that I have forgotten the results :| Sep 14, 2015 at 14:59
  • 1
    lol ok, not a big deal: I suppose it's slower anyway, maybe I'll run some tests myself. Thanx
    – AkiRoss
    Sep 14, 2015 at 18:44
  • sum := result[0].Interface().(int) --> what is this syntax do?
    – Krishna ps
    Oct 23, 2021 at 19:50
-4

https://play.golang.org/p/2nN6kjHXIsd

I had a reason to unpack some vars from a map[string]string with single quotes around some of them as well as without. Here's the logic for it and the play link up top has the full working snippet.

func unpack(a map[string]string) string {

var stmt, val string
var x, y []string
for k, v := range a {
    x = append(x, k)
    y = append(y, "'"+v+"'")
}

stmt = "INSERT INTO tdo.rca_trans_status (" + strings.Join(x, ", ")
val = ") VALUES (" + strings.Join(y, ",") + ");"

return stmt + val}

Which presents cleanly for a mssql query as:

INSERT INTO tdo.rca_trans_status (rca_json_body, original_org, md5sum, updated, rca_key) VALUES ('blob','EG','2343453463','2009-11-10 23:00:00','prb-180');
3
-26

No, there's no direct support for this in the language. Python and Ruby, as well as Javascript you're mentioning; are all dynamic/scripting languages. Go is way closer to, for example, C than to any dynamic language. The 'apply' functionality is handy for dynamic languages, but of little use for static languages like C or Go,

2
  • @user7610 you are wrong. You are reffering to different case than in question. In original question there is no variadic parameter in function declaration. Jul 31, 2018 at 13:49
  • Yeah, I was, I guess. What Python/Ruby does can be thought of as syntactic sugar for the reflective call that Go supports...
    – user7610
    Jul 31, 2018 at 15:58

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