17

tl;dr

In a good design. Should accessing the database be handled in a separate business logic layer (in an asp.net MVC model), or is it OK to pass IQueryables or DbContext objects to a controller?

Why? What are the pros and cons of each?


I'm building an ASP.NET MVC application in C#. It uses EntityFramework as an ORM.

Let's simplify this scenario a bit.

I have a database table with cute fluffy kittens. Each kitten has a kitten image link, kitten fluffiness index, kitten name and kitten id. These map to an EF generated POCO called Kitten. I might use this class in other projects and not just the asp.net MVC project.

I have a KittenController which should fetch the latest fluffy kittens at /Kittens. It may contain some logic selecting the kitten, but not too much logic. I've been arguing with a friend about how to implement this, I won't disclose sides :)

Option 1: db in the controller:

public ActionResult Kittens() // some parameters might be here
{
   using(var db = new KittenEntities()){ // db can also be injected,
       var result = db.Kittens // this explicit query is here
                      .Where(kitten=>kitten.fluffiness > 10) 
                      .Select(kitten=>new {
                            Name=kitten.name,
                            Url=kitten.imageUrl
                      }).Take(10); 
       return Json(result,JsonRequestBehavior.AllowGet);
   }
}

Option 2: Separate model

public class Kitten{
   public string Name {get; set; }
   public string Url {get; set; }
   private Kitten(){
        _fluffiness = fluffinessIndex;
   }

   public static IEnumerable<Kitten> GetLatestKittens(int fluffinessIndex=10){ 
        using(var db = new KittenEntities()){ //connection can also be injected
            return db.Kittens.Where(kitten=>kitten.fluffiness > 10)
                     .Select(entity=>new Kitten(entity.name,entity.imageUrl))
                     .Take(10).ToList();
        }
    } // it's static for simplicity here, in fact it's probably also an object method
      // Also, in practice it might be a service in a services directory creating the
      // Objects and fetching them from the DB, and just the kitten MVC _type_ here

}

//----Then the controller:
public ActionResult Kittens() // some parameters might be here
{
    return Json(Kittens.GetLatestKittens(10),JsonRequestBehavior.AllowGet);
}

Notes: GetLatestKittens is unlikely to be used elsewhere in the code but it might. It's possible to use the constructor of Kitten instead of a static building method and changing the class for Kittens. Basically it's supposed to be a layer above the database entities so the controller does not have to be aware of the actual database, the mapper, or entity framework.

  • What are some pros and cons for each design?
  • Is there a clear winner? Why?

Note: Of course, alternative approaches are very valued as answers too.

Clarification 1: This is not a trivial application in practice. This is an application with tens of controllers and thousands of lines of code, and the entities are not only used here but in tens of other C# projects. The example here is a reduced test case.

closed as primarily opinion-based by Benjamin Gruenbaum, Robert Harvey Jul 18 '13 at 19:05

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • If your method will unlikely be used ever again then it is bad design, because you will end up with many such methods and you can look at LINQ in controller and understand what it does instead of creating long method names. – Akash Kava Jul 9 '13 at 20:26
  • @AkashKava Thanks for your time! I've already read, (and up-voted, somewhat for voicing an interesting, unpopular opinion here). If you'd like to expand on your take - I'd appreciate it if you do so in your answer, providing example of pros and cons and further explaining why you think it's the best approach instead of leaving a comment. That way it'll be easier for me, as well as other users in this positions to decide. Thanks a lot again for your input on the subject! – Benjamin Gruenbaum Jul 9 '13 at 20:31
  • 3
    This question is a bit too broad and discussion-oriented for Stack Overflow. I'm going to let the bounty lapse, since some users clearly put some decent effort into their answers, but after that, I'm going to close it. – Robert Harvey Jul 18 '13 at 17:43
  • 1
    This turned out great and I got a lot of interesting answers. However, it turned out to be a lot more opinion based than I expected - I expected lists of pros and cons based in facts and I got answers that focused mainly on personal experience, I really appreciate all the advice I got and I'm sure it'll be helpful to future users. I agree with @RobertHarvey that it turned out to be opinion based. Thanks again everyone. – Benjamin Gruenbaum Jul 18 '13 at 18:52
  • @BenjaminGruenbaum I hate to put answer for unpopular opinion as it gets down voted by idiots with zero experience and most theoretical nonsense they read on blogs. First of all most people who have put in answers come from PHP world, where MODEL mean something else because of absence of Entity Framework and its LINQ functionality. In .NET we don't need separate MODEL because LINQ is powerful and small, in PHP kind of environment, creating queries requires more code. Also if you do what others are suggesting, you end up with Controller with 3-4 lines method and Model method with 2-3 lines. – Akash Kava Aug 2 '13 at 11:25
12
+50

Option 1 and 2 are bit extreme and like the choice between the devil and the deep blue sea but if I had to choose between the two I would prefer option 1.

First of all, option 2 will throw a runtime exception because Entity Framework does not support to project into an entity (Select(e => new Kitten(...)) and it does not allow to use a constructor with parameters in a projection. Now, this note seems a bit pedantic in this context, but by projecting into the entity and returning a Kitten (or an enumeration of Kittens) you are hiding the real problem with that approach.

Obviously, your method returns two properties of the entity that you want to use in your view - the kitten's name and imageUrl. Because these are only a selection of all Kitten properties returning a (half-filled) Kitten entity would not be appropriate. So, what type to actually return from this method?

  • You could return object (or IEnumerable<object>) (that's how I understand your comment about the "object method") which is fine if you pass the result into Json(...) to be processed in Javascript later. But you would lose all compile time type information and I doubt that an object result type is useful for anything else.
  • You could return some named type that just contains the two properties - maybe called "KittensListDto".

Now, this is only one method for one view - the view to list kittens. Then you have a details view to display a single kitten, then an edit view and then a delete confirm view maybe. Four views for an existing Kitten entity, each of which needs possibly different properties and each of which would need a separate method and projection and a different DTO type. The same for the Dog entity and for 100 entities more in the project and you get perhaps 400 methods and 400 return types.

And most likely not a single one will be ever reused at any other place than this specific view. Why would you want to Take 10 kittens with just name and imageUrl anywhere a second time? Do you have a second kittens list view? If so, it will have a reason and the queries are only identical by accident and now and if one changes the other one does not necessarily, otherwise the list view is not properly "reused" and should not exist twice. Or is the same list used by an Excel export maybe? But perhaps the Excel users want to have 1000 kittens tomorrow, while the view should still display only 10. Or the view should display the kitten's Age tomorrow, but the Excel users don't want to have that because their Excel macros would not run correctly anymore with that change. Just because two pieces of code are identical they don't have to be factored out into a common reusable component if they are in a different context or have different semantics. You better leave it a GetLatestKittensForListView and GetLatestKittensForExcelExport. Or you better don't have such methods in your service layer at all.


In the light of these considerations an excursion to a Pizza shop as an analogy why the first approach is superior :)

"Welcome to BigPizza, the custom Pizza shop, may I take your order?" "Well, I'd like to have a Pizza with olives, but tomato sauce on top and cheese at the bottom and bake it in the oven for 90 minutes until it's black and hard like a flat rock of granite." "OK, Sir, custom Pizzas are our profession, we'll make it."

The cashier goes to the kitchen. "There is a psycho at the counter, he wants to have a Pizza with... it's a rock of granite with ... wait ... we need to have a name first", he tells the cook.

"No!", the cook screams, "not again! You know we tried that already." He takes a stack of paper with 400 pages, "here we have rock of granite from 2005, but... it didn't have olives, but paprica instead... or here is top tomato ... but the customer wanted it baked only half a minute." "Maybe we should call it TopTomatoGraniteRockSpecial?" "But it doesn't take the cheese at the bottom into account..." The cashier: "That's what Special is supposed to express." "But having the Pizza rock formed like a pyramid would be special as well", the cook replies. "Hmmm ... it is difficult...", the desparate cashier says.

"IS MY PIZZA ALREADY IN THE OVEN?", suddenly it shouts through the kitchen door. "Let's stop this discussion, just tell me how to make this Pizza, we are not going to have such a Pizza a second time", the cook decides. "OK, it's a Pizza with olives, but tomato sauce on top and cheese at the bottom and bake it in the oven for 90 minutes until it's black and hard like a flat rock of granite."


If option 1 violates a separation of concerns principle by using a database context in the view layer the option 2 violates the same principle by having presentation centric query logic in the service or business layer. From a technical viewpoint it does not but it will end up with a service layer that is anything else than "reusable" outside of the presentation layer. And it has much higher development and maintenance costs because for every required piece of data in a controller action you have to create services, methods and return types.

Now, there actually might be queries or query parts that are reused often and that's why I think that option 1 is almost as extreme as option 2 - for example a Where clause by the key (will be probably used in details, edit and delete confirm view), filtering out "soft deleted" entities, filtering by a tenant in a multi-tenant architecture or disabling change tracking, etc. For such really repetetive query logic I could imagine that extracting this into a service or repository layer (but maybe only reusable extensions methods) might make sense, like

public IQueryable<Kitten> GetKittens()
{
    return context.Kittens.AsNoTracking().Where(k => !k.IsDeleted);
}

Anything else that follows after - like projecting properties - is view specific and I would not like to have it in this layer. In order to make this approach possible IQueryable<T> must be exposed from the service/repository. It does not mean that the select must be directly in the controller action. Especially fat and complex projections (that maybe join other entities by navigation properties, perform groupings, etc.) could be moved into extension methods of IQueryable<T> that are collected in other files, directories or even another project, but still a project that is an appendix to the presentation layer and much closer to it than to the service layer. An action could then look like this:

public ActionResult Kittens()
{
    var result = kittenService.GetKittens()
        .Where(kitten => kitten.fluffiness > 10) 
        .OrderBy(kitten => kitten.name)
        .Select(kitten => new {
            Name=kitten.name,
            Url=kitten.imageUrl
        })
        .Take(10);
    return Json(result,JsonRequestBehavior.AllowGet);
}

Or like this:

public ActionResult Kittens()
{
    var result = kittenService.GetKittens()
        .ToKittenListViewModel(10, 10);
    return Json(result,JsonRequestBehavior.AllowGet);
}

With ToKittenListViewModel() being:

public static IEnumerable<object> ToKittenListViewModel(
    this IQueryable<Kitten> kittens, int minFluffiness, int pageItems)
{
    return kittens
        .Where(kitten => kitten.fluffiness > minFluffiness)
        .OrderBy(kitten => kitten.name)
        .Select(kitten => new {
            Name = kitten.name,
            Url = kitten.imageUrl
        })
        .Take(pageItems)
        .AsEnumerable()
        .Cast<object>();
}

That's just a basic idea and a sketch that another solution could be in the middle between option 1 and 2.

Well, it all depends on the overall architecture and requirements and all what I wrote above might be useless and wrong. Do you have to consider that the ORM or data access technology could be changed in future? Could there be a physical boundary between controller and database, is the controller disconnected from the context and do the data need to be fetched via a web service for example in future? This would require a very different approach which would more lean towards option 2.

Such an architecture is so different that - in my opinion - you simply can't say "maybe" or "not now, but possibly it could be a requirement in future, or possibly it won't". This is something that the project's stakeholders have to define before you can proceed with architectural decisions as it will increase development costs dramatically and it will we wasted money in development and maintenance if the "maybe" turns out to never become reality.

I was talking only about queries or GET requests in a web app which have rarely something that I would call "business logic" at all. POST requests and modifying data are a whole different story. If it is forbidden that an order can be changed after it is invoiced for example this is a general "business rule" that normally applies no matter which view or web service or background process or whatever tries to change an order. I would definitely put such a check for the order status into a business service or any common component and never into a controller.

There might be an argument against using IQueryable<T> in a controller action because it is coupled to LINQ-to-Entities and it will make unit tests difficult. But what is a unit test going to test in a controller action that doesn't contain any business logic, that gets parameters passed in that usually come from a view via model binding or routing - not covered by the unit test - that uses a mocked repository/service returning IEnumerable<T> - database query and access is not tested - and that returns a View - correct rendering of the view is not tested?

  • Awesome answer, I'm all wobbly from jelly. I would however like to point out something that was lost in my answer's abstraction: Having the DB take the "top 10" every time is indeed pretty terrible, the model shouldn't contain this kind of hardcoding. But knowing the OP, it probably doesn't. – Zirak Jul 18 '13 at 18:05
  • Thanks for raising arguments for the second stance. Zirak is correct about "top 10 kittens" - obviously that sort of magic number wouldn't be present in actual code. Very nice answer and analogy, especially - the point about violating SoC from the other side. (And yes, I have not problems with unit tests either way, I just pass Enumerables and call AsQueryable :) ) . The problem is the app contains a lot of business logic in the models, these are entities that are shared across tens of projects, each with different needs and the API isn't just a restful bridge. Thanks again :) – Benjamin Gruenbaum Jul 18 '13 at 18:16
25

The second approach is superior. Let's try a lame analogy:

You enter a pizza shop and walk over to the counter. "Welcome to McPizza Maestro Double Deluxe, may I take your order?" the pimpled cashier asks you, the void in his eyes threatening to lure you in. "Yeah I'll have one large pizza with olives". "Okay", the cashier replies and his voice croaks in the middle of the "o" sound. He yells towards the kitchen "One Jimmy Carter!"

And then, after waiting for a bit, you get a large pizza with olives. Did you notice anything peculiar? The cashier didn't say "Take some dough, spin it round like it's Christmas time, pour some cheese and tomato sauce, sprinkle olives and put in an oven for about 8 minutes!" Come to think of it, that's not peculiar at all. The cashier is simply a gateway between two worlds: The customer who wants the pizza, and the cook who makes the pizza. For all the cashier knows, the cook gets his pizza from aliens or slices them from Jimmy Carter (he's a dwindling resource, people).

That is your situation. Your cashier isn't dumb. He knows how to make pizza. That doesn't mean he should be making pizza, or telling someone how to make pizza. That's the cook's job. As other answers (notably Florian Margaine's and Madara Uchiha's) illustrated, there is a separation of responsibilities. The model might not do much, it might be just one function call, it might be even one line - but that doesn't matter, because the controller doesn't care.

Now, let's say the owners decide that pizzas are just a fad (blasphemy!) and you switch over to something more contemporary, a fancy burger joint. Let's review what happens:

You enter a fancy burger joint and walk over to the counter. "Welcome to Le Burger Maestro Double Deluxe, may I take your order?" "yeah, I'll have one large hamburger with olives". "Okay", and he turns to the kitchen, "One Jimmy Carter!"

And then, you get a large hamburger with olives (ew).

  • Great explanation. Pizza.. mmmn. – Lews Therin Jul 17 '13 at 12:41
  • 2
    +1 Excellent answer except making me hungry after reading it. – Win Jul 18 '13 at 15:38
  • +1 Love the analogy - especially the comparing Jimmy Carter to food with Olives! – Catchops Jul 16 '14 at 14:49
  • hungry, hah?... – levi Nov 21 '15 at 20:27
  • Upvoting this just because of how hard it made me laugh! – R. McManaman May 22 '17 at 13:18
9

This is the key phrase there:

I might use this class in other projects and not just the asp.net MVC project.

A controller is HTTP-centric. It is only there to handle HTTP requests. If you want to use your model in any other project, i.e. your business logic, you can't have any logic in the controllers. You must be able to take off your model, put it somewhere else, and all your business logic still works.

So, no, don't access your database from your controller. It kills any possible reuse you might ever get.

Do you really want to rewrite all your db/linq requests in all your projects when you can have simple methods that you reuse?

Another thing: your function in option 1 has two responsibilities: it fetches the result from a mapper object and it displays it. That's too many responsibilities. There is an "and" in the list of responsibilities. Your option 2 only has one responsibility: being the link between the model and the view.

4

I'm not sure about how ASP.NET or C# does things. But I do know MVC.

In MVC, you separate your application into two major layers: The Presentational layer (which contains the Controller and View), and the Model layer (which contains... the Model).

The point is to separate the 3 major responsibilities in the application:

  1. The application logic, handling request, user input, etc. That's the Controller.
  2. The presentation logic, handling templating, display, formats. That's the View.
  3. The business logic or "heavy logic", handling basically everything else. That's your actual application basically, where everything your application is supposed to do gets done. This part handles domain objects that represents the information structures of the application, it handles the mapping of those objects into permanent storage (be it session, database or files).

As you can see, database handling is found on the Model, and it has several advantages:

  • The controller is less tied to the model. Because "the work" gets done in the Model, should you want to change your controller, you'll be able to do so more easily if your database handling is in the Model.
  • You gain more flexibility. In the case where you want to change your mapping scheme (I want to switch to Postgres from MySQL), I only need to change it once (in the base Mapper definition).

For more information, see the excellent answer here: How should a model be structured in MVC?

  • +1 Nice! I know where you got this info from ;) – samayo Jul 9 '13 at 20:08
  • what user is asking about, it is the business logic where he should write. Entity framework already covers database mapping and worries of changing from MySQL to anything else. Accepting User Requests etc are all processed. Simply creating another class for writing business logic and calling one method in controller does not make sense. – Akash Kava Jul 9 '13 at 20:21
  • 3
    @AkashKava: Like I said, I don't know C# or ASP.NET. This is from a pure MVC perspective. I don't know what your framework handles for you. But probably rule #1 of MVC, is that you don't have database in the controller. You do not have business logic in the controller. – Madara Uchiha Jul 9 '13 at 21:05
2

I prefer the second approach. It at least separates between controller and business logic. It is still a little bit hard to unit test (may be I'm not good at mocking).

I personally prefer the following approach. Main reason is it is easy to unit testing for each layer - presentation, business logic, data access. Besides, you can see that approach in a lot of open source projects.

namespace MyProject.Web.Controllers
{
   public class MyController : Controller
   {
      private readonly IKittenService _kittenService ;

      public MyController(IKittenService kittenService)
      {
         _kittenService = kittenService;
      }

      public ActionResult Kittens()
      {
          // var result = _kittenService.GetLatestKittens(10);
          // Return something.
      }
   }  
}

namespace MyProject.Domain.Kittens
{
   public class Kitten
   {
      public string Name {get; set; }
      public string Url {get; set; }
   }
}

namespace MyProject.Services.KittenService
{
   public interface IKittenService
   {
       IEnumerable<Kitten> GetLatestKittens(int fluffinessIndex=10);
   }
}

namespace MyProject.Services.KittenService
{
   public class KittenService : IKittenService
   {
      public IEnumerable<Kitten> GetLatestKittens(int fluffinessIndex=10)
      {
         using(var db = new KittenEntities())
         {
            return db.Kittens // this explicit query is here
                      .Where(kitten=>kitten.fluffiness > 10) 
                      .Select(kitten=>new {
                            Name=kitten.name,
                            Url=kitten.imageUrl
                      }).Take(10); 
         }
      }
   }
}
2

@Win has the idea I'd more or less follow.

Have the Presentation just presents.

The Controller simply acts as a bridge, it does nothing really, it is the middle man. Should be easy to test.

The DAL is the hardest part. Some like to separate it out on a web service, I have done so for a project once. That way you can also have the DAL act as an API for others (internally or externally) to consume - so WCF or WebAPI comes to mind.

That way your DAL is completely independent of your web server. If someone hacks your server, the DAL is probably still secure.

It's up to you I guess.

  • Were I to use WebAPI instead of a normal MVC4 controller, would you say that then putting the logic in the controller is OK, or would you still consider it a mistake? – Benjamin Gruenbaum Jul 15 '13 at 18:59
  • @BenjaminGruenbaum I think it should still be separate. What I have in my head is that your MVC4 controller consumes from the WebAPI. The two should be entirely decoupled as much as possible. I'm yet to find an actual document supporting this :( – Lews Therin Jul 15 '13 at 19:02
  • Just a note on dogfooding your API: be careful about robustness. I invested some (thankfully not much) time in the idea before, however the API technology I was working with wasn't robust enough to handle the queries I wanted to perform. I ended up re-referencing the data access layer directly and dropping the API. – Dan Lugg Jul 18 '13 at 17:42
2

Single Responsibility Principle. Each of your classes should have one and only one reason to change. @Zirak gives a good example of how each person has a single reponsibility in the chain of events.

Let's look at the hypothetical test case you have provided.

public ActionResult Kittens() // some parameters might be here
{
   using(var db = new KittenEntities()){ // db can also be injected,
       var result = db.Kittens // this explicit query is here
                      .Where(kitten=>kitten.fluffiness > 10) 
                      .Select(kitten=>new {
                            Name=kitten.name,
                            Url=kitten.imageUrl
                      }).Take(10); 
       return Json(result,JsonRequestBehavior.AllowGet);
   }
}

With a service layer in between, it might look something like this.

public ActionResult Kittens() // some parameters might be here
{
    using(var service = new KittenService())
    {
        var result =  service.GetFluffyKittens();  
        return Json(result,JsonRequestBehavior.AllowGet);
    }
}

public class KittenService : IDisposable
{
    public IEnumerable<Kitten> GetFluffyKittens()
    {
        using(var db = new KittenEntities()){ // db can also be injected,
            return db.Kittens // this explicit query is here
                      .Where(kitten=>kitten.fluffiness > 10) 
                      .Select(kitten=>new {
                            Name=kitten.name,
                            Url=kitten.imageUrl
                      }).Take(10); 
        }
    }
}

With a few more imaginary controller classes, you can see how this would be much easier to reuse. That's great! We have code reuse, but there's even more benefit. Lets say for example, our Kitten website is taking off like crazy, everyone wants to look at fluffy kittens, so we need to partition our database (shard). The constructor for all our db calls needs to be injected with the connection to the proper database. With our controller based EF code, we would have to change the controllers because of a DATABASE issue.

Clearly that means that our controllers are now dependant upon database concerns. They now have too many reasons to change, which can potentially lead to accidental bugs in the code and needing to retest code that is unrelated to that change.

With a service, we could do the following, while the controllers are protected from that change.

public class KittenService : IDisposable
{
    public IEnumerable<Kitten> GetFluffyKittens()
    {
        using(var db = GetDbContextForFuffyKittens()){ // db can also be injected,
            return db.Kittens // this explicit query is here
                      .Where(kitten=>kitten.fluffiness > 10) 
                      .Select(kitten=>new {
                            Name=kitten.name,
                            Url=kitten.imageUrl
                      }).Take(10); 
        }
    }

    protected KittenEntities GetDbContextForFuffyKittens(){
        // ... code to determine the least used shard and get connection string ...
        var connectionString = GetShardThatIsntBusy();
        return new KittensEntities(connectionString);
    }
}

The key here is to isolate changes from reaching other parts of your code. You should be testing anything that is affected by a change in code, so you want to isolate changes from one another. This has the side effect of keeping your code DRY, so you end up with more flexible and reusable classes and services.

Separating the classes also allows you to centralize behavior that would have either been difficult or repetitive before. Think about logging errors in your data access. In the first method, you would need logging everywhere. With a layer in between you can easily insert some logging logic.

public class KittenService : IDisposable
{
    public IEnumerable<Kitten> GetFluffyKittens()
    {
        Func<IEnumerable<Kitten>> func = () => {
            using(var db = GetDbContextForFuffyKittens()){ // db can also be injected,
                return db.Kittens // this explicit query is here
                        .Where(kitten=>kitten.fluffiness > 10) 
                        .Select(kitten=>new {
                                Name=kitten.name,
                                Url=kitten.imageUrl
                        }).Take(10); 
            }
        };
        return this.Execute(func);
    }

    protected KittenEntities GetDbContextForFuffyKittens(){
        // ... code to determine the least used shard and get connection string ...
        var connectionString = GetShardThatIsntBusy();
        return new KittensEntities(connectionString);
    }

    protected T Execute(Func<T> func){
        try
        {
            return func();
        }
        catch(Exception ex){
            Logging.Log(ex);
            throw ex;
        }
    }
}
1

Either way is not so good for testing. Use dependency injection to get the DI container to create the db context and inject it into the controller constructor.

EDIT: a little more on testing

If you can test you can see if you application works per spec before you publish.
If you can't test easily you won't write your test.

from that chat room:

Okay, so on a trivial application you write it and it doesn't change very much, but on a non trivial application you get these nasty things called dependencies, which when you change one breaks a lot of shit, so you use Dependency injection to inject a repo that you can fake, and then you can write unit tests in order to make sure your code doesn't

1

If I had (note: really had) to chose between the 2 given options, I'd say 1 for simplicity, but I don't recommend using it since it's hard to maintain and causes a lot of duplicate code. A controller should contain as less business logic as possible. It should only delegate data access, map it to a ViewModel and pass it to the View.

If you want to abstract data access away from your controller (which is a good thing), you might want to create a service layer containing a method like GetLatestKittens(int fluffinessIndex).

I don't recommend placing data access logic in your POCO either, this doesn't allow you to switch to another ORM (NHibernate for example) and reuse the same POCO's.

  • Oh sure, it's simple now. But 6 months from now, you'll be sorry you settled for simplicity. – Madara Uchiha Jul 9 '13 at 20:06
  • @MadaraUchiha that's what I'm trying to explain in the answer.. Just saying if I HAD to chose. – Henk Mollema Jul 9 '13 at 20:18
  • eh ? If you had to choose, you'd choose the one that is bad ? – NimChimpsky Jul 21 '14 at 14:50

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