38

There are many SO questions that show how to view the output of a git diff command in a diff viewer like meld using git difftool or otherwise. I am not asking about git diff though.

I want to see the output of git show <previous commit sha1> in a diff viewer like meld. How can I do this?

  • 2
    gitk, gitg, and others come to mind... – twalberg Jul 9 '13 at 21:40
45

You can use git difftool to show a single commit.

Say you want to see the commit with the sha1 abc123:

git difftool abc123~1 abc123

(~1 tells git to move to the previous commit, so abc123~1 is the commit before abc123)

If you use this regularly, you could make a custom git command to make it easier:

  1. Create a file called git-showtool somewhere on your $PATH with the following contents:

    git difftool $1~1 $1
    
  2. Give that file execute permissions:

    chmod +x ~/path/to/git-showtool
    
  3. Use the command git showtool <sha1 or tag or ...>

  4. Profit.
  • also, you should cross-check what commit you are going to view and whether it contains many changed files. because meld is going to open one after the other consecutively – user2291758 May 19 '15 at 14:16
  • Unfortunately I get the following error. Launch 'p4mergetool' [Y/n]? Y /mingw64/libexec/git-core/git-mergetool--lib: eval: line 124: unexpected EOF while looking for matching `"' /mingw64/libexec/git-core/git-mergetool--lib: eval: line 125: syntax error: unexpected end of file – jpierson Mar 6 '17 at 16:19
  • git show $commit is not equivalent to git difftool $commit~1 $commit if we are reviewing a merge commit. git show presents the merge commit in a special format as produced by git diff-tree --cc $commit. See git-scm.com/docs/git-show – Abdul Rauf Jul 18 '18 at 5:52
  • You can use the ^ to do parent commits also like git difftool abc123^ abc123. Apply multiple times to go up the tree higher like abc123^^^ – jocull Aug 3 '18 at 14:57
18

Building on georgebrock's response, you can create an alias in .gitconfig, something like this:

showtool = "!showci () { rev=${1:-HEAD}; git difftool $rev~1 $rev; }; showci $1"

Then you can run it with git showtool abc123 (without needing to create a separate shell script for this). If you leave out the revision it will default to HEAD.

  • 1
    I agree a git alias would probably be better. Thanks for the suggestion. – Buttons840 Jan 15 '15 at 19:31
  • I strongly prefer this solution :) And I passed --dir-diff to the difftool command to be even more convenient for me. – StormRider Aug 2 '17 at 7:58
9

Translating sagittarian's suggestion for the less git savvy, add this to your global .gitconfig file which resides in C:\Users[user name] if you are a windows user:

[alias]
    showtool = "!showci () { rev=${1:-HEAD}; git difftool $rev~1 $rev; }; showci $1"

or you can execute the following command in the get bash shell:

git config --global alias.showtool '!showci () { rev=${1:-HEAD}; git difftool $rev~1 $rev; }; showci $1'

which will make the change to the .gitconfig file for you.

3

Building on sagitarrian's answer, here's a small change for more generic rev syntax:

showtool = "!showci () { rev=$(git rev-parse \"${*:-HEAD}\"); git difftool $rev~1 $rev; }; showci"

I use rev-parse to transparently allow complex rev expressions.

I removed the $1 at the end, since the alias is called followed by the arguments; it passes unnoticed when using only $1 but breaks $* behaviour.

This allows doing nice things like:

git showtool :/some nasty bug
1

Geogrebrock answer is fine, but can be improved thus:

commit=$1
shift
git difftool $commit~1 $commit $@

Put it in executable (chmod +x) file somewhere in $PATH.

Now you can pass additional arguments, for example specify what files you want to see (and ignore others):

$ git showtool 6a40ec6ffb9338b0548aefab92fded1bffb1648a -- src-cmn/
0

The git-showcommit file (executable) in the PATH should be as follow:

#!/bin/bash

git difftool --dir-diff $1^..$1

then you can simply call the new tool by git showcommit HEAD or git showcommit a5b26d5

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.