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I am designing an app to run on hbase and want to interactively explore the contents of my cluster. I am in the hbase shell and I want to perform a scan of all keys starting with the chars "abc". Such keys might inlcude "abc4", "abc92", "abc20014" etc... I tried a scan

hbase(main):003:0> scan 'mytable', {STARTROW => 'abc', ENDROW => 'abc'}

But this does not seem to return anything since there is technically no rowkey "abc" only rowkeys starting with "abc"

What I want is something like

hbase(main):003:0> scan 'mytable', {STARTSROWPREFIX => 'abc', ENDROWPREFIX => 'abc'}

I hear HBase can do this quickly and is one of its main selling points. How do I do this in the hbase shell?

47

So it turns out to be very easy. The scan ranges are not inclusive, the logic is start <= key < end. So the answer is

scan 'mytable', {STARTROW => 'abc', ENDROW => 'abd'}
  • That's right - looks like you found this out the hard way. :) Do you want to mark this as the right answer? – Suman Jul 10 '13 at 20:24
  • however hbase doc should say that startrow is actually startrowprefix – nir May 12 '14 at 21:15
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    If your rows only use 'ASCII' values then it is as simple as you describe here. If you really use binary rowkeys then it becomes a lot more difficult. Check here issues.apache.org/jira/browse/HBASE-11990 to see what discussion and edge cases trying to create a generic solution brought to light. – Niels Basjes Sep 29 '14 at 15:42
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In recent versions of HBase you can now do in the hbase shell:

scan 'mytable', {ROWPREFIXFILTER => 'abc'}

This effectively does this (and also works for binary situations)

scan 'mytable', {STARTROW => 'abc', ENDROW => 'abd'}

This method is a LOT more efficient than the "PrefixFilter" approach because the latter puts all records through the comparison code the is present in this PrefixFilter class.

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    I'm having trouble understanding the purpose of the PrefixFilter, when startrow and stoprow appear to be superior. Do you know of any usecases? I've also heard that people combine all three. – Matthew Moisen Oct 22 '16 at 19:13
  • I never use the PrefixFilter at all anymore. Perhaps there is a good reason to use it when doing something in a coprocessor, otherwise I would even vote to remove the class from HBase altogether. – Niels Basjes Oct 22 '16 at 19:56
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    Unfortunately I've been using it this whole time because I mistakenly assumed that you needed to have an exact match on the start and end rows. I ran a test on 5million rows divided between 26 different rowkey prefixes, and the prefix filter is about 300% slower for me on average. Now I'm spending my Saturday refactoring all of my jobs :) – Matthew Moisen Oct 23 '16 at 1:17
  • Not sure if you would know the answer to this, but I figured I would send it your way: stackoverflow.com/questions/40197883/… – Matthew Moisen Oct 23 '16 at 1:19
22

The accepted solution won't work in all cases (binary keys). In addition, using a PrefixFilter can be slow because it performs a table scan until it reaches the prefix. A more performant solution is to use a STARTROW and a FILTER like so:

 scan 'my_table', {STARTROW => 'abc', FILTER => "PrefixFilter('abc')"}
  • I'm having trouble understanding the purpose of the PrefixFilter, when startrow and stoprow appear to be superior. Do you know of any usecases? I've also heard that people combine all three. – Matthew Moisen Oct 22 '16 at 19:12
  • This is the solution that worked for me. My key is composed of AAA_B_CCC. I needed all the rows where the key started with AAA_. – Amro Younes May 10 '17 at 21:02
1

I think what you need is a filter

checkout the answer for following question Scan with filter using HBase shell

more filters are listed in http://hbase.apache.org/book/client.filter.html

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