2

qsort is working here, but if each member of array v occupies sizeof(void *), why is qsort expecting sizeof(int)?

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int comp(const void *pa, const void *pb)
{
    int a = *(int *)pa;
    int b = *(int *)pb;

    if (a > b)
        return +1;
    else
    if (b > a)
        return -1;
    else
        return 0;
}

int main(void)
{
    int i, a[] = {3, 1, 2, 0, 4};
    void **v;

    v = malloc(sizeof(void *) * 5);
    for (i = 0; i < 5; i++) {
        v[i] = &a[i];
    }
    for (i = 0; i < 5; i++) {
        printf("%d\n", *(int *)v[i]);
    }
    qsort(v[0], 5, sizeof(int), comp); // why sizeof(int) if v is void **
    printf("Sorted:\n");
    for (i = 0; i < 5; i++) {
        printf("%d\n", *(int *)v[i]);
    }
    free(v);
    return 0;
}
  • David: do you understand v[i] = &a[i]; expression in your code, Why this is needed and why v is void* is correct here ?? – Grijesh Chauhan Jul 10 '13 at 12:12
  • @GrijeshChauhan, I have to use void ** (as abstraction for a generic container) to sort different types – Keine Lust Jul 10 '13 at 12:19
  • 1
    Correct!, and v[i] = &a[i] is needed because you wants to sort a[] array, But in qsort() call you are passing v that doesn't contain about type of your array a[] hence you explicitly passing content information that a[i] elements are int. – Grijesh Chauhan Jul 10 '13 at 12:23
  • 1
    Thank you Grijesh – Keine Lust Jul 10 '13 at 12:30
6
qsort(v[0], 5, sizeof(int), comp); // why sizeof(int) if v is void **

The address of the start of the memory block to be sorted that you pass to qsort is

v[0] = &a[0]

the address of the initial element of a, so the array that you sort is a, not the block whose initial element v points to. a's elements are ints, so sizeof(int) is the correct size.

If you want to sort the array of pointers, you need to pass the address of the first element in that array, &v[0], or simply v to qsort. Then of course the size argument must be sizeof (void*):

qsort(v, 5, sizeof(void*), cmp);

but for that, you can't use the comparison function you have, you need

int cmp(const void *pa, const void *pb) {
    int a = *(int*)(*(void**)pa);
    int b = *(int*)(*(void**)pb);

    if (a > b)
        return +1;
    else
    if (b > a)
        return -1;
    else
        return 0;
}

or something similar. Since what is passed to the comparison function from qsort is the address of the things to compare, we need one indirection to get the pointers to compare, and since here we want to compare pointers by what int values they point to, we need the second indirection to get the pointed-to ints.

  • But the comparison is still incorrect, isn't it? – user529758 Jul 10 '13 at 12:06
  • No, qsort passes &a[i] and &a[j] (computed via the size parameter) to comp, so it's correct. It may not be what was intended - if the intention was to sort the array of pointers - but as it turns out, the code is correct. Perhaps accidentally. – Daniel Fischer Jul 10 '13 at 12:08
  • Yes, I know &a[i] and &a[j] are passed to the comparator and that's exactly what confuses me... I don't see how it's correct, I'm missing a level of indirection... maybe I should have a nap instead of hanging around on SO :) – user529758 Jul 10 '13 at 12:10
  • got it Daniel, thanks, and yes, the intention was to sort the array of pointers, how to pass void ** to qsort in order to sort v (not a)? – Keine Lust Jul 10 '13 at 12:11
  • 1
    @H2CO3 The call is actually qsort(a, 5, sizeof(int), comp); (well, &a[0] if one wants to make the conversion explicit). Do you see why that works? The v is just fluff that doesn't affect the sort at all. – Daniel Fischer Jul 10 '13 at 12:12

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.