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This question already has an answer here:

It is said that nonatomic option will make your setter method run faster. I googled it but am not able to understand. Could someone tell me why?

marked as duplicate by bbum, thegrinner, trudyscousin, Warren Burton, Bhavin Jul 10 '13 at 14:03

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Declaring a property atomic makes compiler generate additional code that prevents concurrent access to the property. This additional code locks a semaphore, then gets or sets the property, and then unlock the semaphore. Compared to setting or getting a primitive value or a pointer, locking and unlocking a semaphore is expensive (although it is usually negligible if you consider the overall flow of your app).

Since most of your classes under iOS, especially the ones related to UI, will be used in a single-threaded environment, it is safe to drop atomic (i.e. write nonatomic, because properties are atomic by default): even though the operation is relatively inexpensive, you do not want to pay for things that you do not need.

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    1+ The part about it being safe to drop atomic for UI properties since it should always be updated on the main thread anyway – David Rönnqvist Jul 10 '13 at 13:15
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    You might want to clarify that in order to "drop" atomic, you have to explicitly use nonatomic because atomic is the default setting for properties; if you don't specify anything, you get atomic. – Caleb Jul 10 '13 at 13:26
  • @Caleb Great comment, thanks! – dasblinkenlight Jul 10 '13 at 13:45
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see the difference between atomic and nonatomic in objective c

Atomic

Atomic is the default behaviour for a property; by not explicitly setting the above property as nonatomic, it will be atomic.

An atomic property adds a level of thread safety when getting or setting values. That is, the getter and setter for the property will always be fully completed regardless of what other threads are doing. The trade-off is that these properties will be a little slower to access than a nonatomic equivalent.

Non-Atomic

Nonatomic properties are not thread safe, and will return their properties directly. This will be faster than atomic properties, but obviously carries some risk if precautions aren’t made.

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    > 'will ensure the present process is completed by the cpu, before another process access the variable' doesn't this imply thread safety? – powerj1984 Jul 10 '13 at 13:19
  • I have the same question than @powerj1984 – Ricardo Jun 15 '15 at 7:27
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@property (strong) NSString *str;

Atomic is the default behaviour for a property; by not explicitly setting the above property as nonatomic, it will be atomic.

setter & getter for these Atomic property

-(NSString *) str{
@synchronized(self){
return str;
}}

-(void) setStr: (NSString *) newString {
@synchronized(self)  {
str = newString;
}}

An atomic property adds a level of thread safety when getting or setting values. That is, the getter and setter for the property will always be fully completed regardless of what other threads are doing. these properties will be a little slower to access than a nonatomic equivalent.

@property (strong,nonatomic) NSString *str;

Nonatomic properties are not thread safe, and will return their properties directly. This will be faster than atomic properties, but obviously carries some risk if precautions aren’t made.

setter & getter for these Nonatomic property

-(NSString *) str{
    return str;
    }}

-(void) setStr: (NSString *) newString{
str = newString;
}

So by looking on the setter & getter methods for both Atomic & nonatomic that nonatomic methods are very light weight.

  • Your code would only work under ARC. Because ARC guarantees atomicity on object assignment, that latter example is actually atomic. Note that NSString properties should always be declared as copy. – bbum Jul 10 '13 at 13:35