71

I had a code below in Python 3.2 and I wanted to run it in Python 2.7. I did convert it (have put the code of missing_elements in both versions) but I am not sure if that is the most efficient way to do it. Basically what happens if there are two yield from calls like below in upper half and lower half in missing_element function? Are the entries from the two halves (upper and lower) appended to each other in one list so that the parent recursion function with the yield from call and use both the halves together?

def missing_elements(L, start, end):  # Python 3.2
    if end - start <= 1: 
        if L[end] - L[start] > 1:
            yield from range(L[start] + 1, L[end])
        return

index = start + (end - start) // 2

# is the lower half consecutive?
consecutive_low =  L[index] == L[start] + (index - start)
if not consecutive_low:
    yield from missing_elements(L, start, index)

# is the upper part consecutive?
consecutive_high =  L[index] == L[end] - (end - index)
if not consecutive_high:
    yield from missing_elements(L, index, end)

def main():
    L = [10, 11, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 20]
    print(list(missing_elements(L, 0, len(L)-1)))
    L = range(10, 21)
    print(list(missing_elements(L, 0, len(L)-1)))

def missing_elements(L, start, end):  # Python 2.7
    return_list = []                
    if end - start <= 1: 
        if L[end] - L[start] > 1:
            return range(L[start] + 1, L[end])

    index = start + (end - start) // 2

    # is the lower half consecutive?
    consecutive_low =  L[index] == L[start] + (index - start)
    if not consecutive_low:
        return_list.append(missing_elements(L, start, index))

    # is the upper part consecutive?
    consecutive_high =  L[index] == L[end] - (end - index)
    if not consecutive_high:
        return_list.append(missing_elements(L, index, end))
    return return_list
  • Most of the implementations below are lacking support in some regard (for sending values to generators, handling nested yield-froms, etc.). I published a package in PyPI that attempts to be comprehensive in the behavior: amir.rachum.com/yieldfrom – Amir Rachum Jun 9 '19 at 5:18
87
0

If you don't use the results of your yields,* you can always turn this:

yield from foo

… into this:

for bar in foo:
    yield bar

There might be a performance cost,** but there is never a semantic difference.


Are the entries from the two halves (upper and lower) appended to each other in one list so that the parent recursion function with the yield from call and use both the halves together?

No! The whole point of iterators and generators is that you don't build actual lists and append them together.

But the effect is similar: you just yield from one, then yield from another.

If you think of the upper half and the lower half as "lazy lists", then yes, you can think of this as a "lazy append" that creates a larger "lazy list". And if you call list on the result of the parent function, you of course will get an actual list that's equivalent to appending together the two lists you would have gotten if you'd done yield list(…) instead of yield from ….

But I think it's easier to think of it the other way around: What it does is exactly the same the for loops do.

If you saved the two iterators into variables, and looped over itertools.chain(upper, lower), that would be the same as looping over the first and then looping over the second, right? No difference here. In fact, you could implement chain as just:

for arg in *args:
    yield from arg

* Not the values the generator yields to its caller, the value of the yield expressions themselves, within the generator (which come from the caller using the send method), as described in PEP 342. You're not using these in your examples. And I'm willing to bet you're not in your real code. But coroutine-style code often uses the value of a yield from expression—see PEP 3156 for examples. Such code usually depends on other features of Python 3.3 generators—in particular, the new StopIteration.value from the same PEP 380 that introduced yield from—so it will have to be rewritten. But if not, you can use the PEP also shows you the complete horrid messy equivalent, and you can of course pare down the parts you don't care about. And if you don't use the value of the expression, it pares down to the two lines above.

** Not a huge one, and there's nothing you can do about it short of using Python 3.3 or completely restructuring your code. It's exactly the same case as translating list comprehensions to Python 1.5 loops, or any other case when there's a new optimization in version X.Y and you need to use an older version.

| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    You probably want to yield bar, not foo. – ovgolovin Jul 10 '13 at 21:45
  • @ovgolovin: Thanks; fixed. – abarnert Jul 10 '13 at 21:48
  • A question how do the recursive calls work? Does the "yield from" parent function combine two "yield from" statements in the child. if not consecutive_low: yield from missing_elements(L, start, index) # is the upper part consecutive? consecutive_high = L[index] == L[end] - (end - index) if not consecutive_high: yield from missing_elements(L, index, end) – vkaul11 Jul 10 '13 at 21:50
  • 1
    @vkaul11: It works exactly like the loop does, except faster (and supporting various more complex cases the loop can't). If you want the gory details, read the PEP. – abarnert Jul 10 '13 at 21:51
  • 1
    @trss: Nope, still the same. Both forms will do nothing. Compare this and this; they both yield nothing, so they print out done then raise StopIteration. (They also both mark the function as a generator function despite not yielding anything, meaning you can yield from () instead of if False: yield None to force a generator.) – abarnert Aug 8 '14 at 21:34
6
0

I just came across this issue and my usage was a bit more difficult since I needed the return value of yield from:

result = yield from other_gen()

This cannot be represented as a simple for loop but can be reproduced with this:

_iter = iter(other_gen())
try:
    while True: #broken by StopIteration
        yield next(_iter)
except StopIteration as e:
    if e.args:
        result = e.args[0]
    else:
        result = None

Hopefully this will help people who come across the same problem. :)

| improve this answer | |
5
0

Replace them with for-loops:

yield from range(L[start] + 1, L[end])

==>

for i in range(L[start] + 1, L[end]):
    yield i

The same about elements:

yield from missing_elements(L, index, end)

==>

for el in missing_elements(L, index, end):
    yield el
| improve this answer | |
3
0

I think I found a way to emulate Python 3.x yield from construct in Python 2.x. It's not efficient and it is a little hacky, but here it is:

import types

def inline_generators(fn):
    def inline(value):
        if isinstance(value, InlineGenerator):
            for x in value.wrapped:
                for y in inline(x):
                    yield y
        else:
            yield value
    def wrapped(*args, **kwargs):
        result = fn(*args, **kwargs)
        if isinstance(result, types.GeneratorType):
            result = inline(_from(result))
        return result
    return wrapped

class InlineGenerator(object):
    def __init__(self, wrapped):
        self.wrapped = wrapped

def _from(value):
    assert isinstance(value, types.GeneratorType)
    return InlineGenerator(value)

Usage:

@inline_generators
def outer(x):
    def inner_inner(x):
        for x in range(1, x + 1):
            yield x
    def inner(x):
        for x in range(1, x + 1):
            yield _from(inner_inner(x))
    for x in range(1, x + 1):
        yield _from(inner(x))

for x in outer(3):
    print x,

Produces output:

1 1 1 2 1 1 2 1 2 3

Maybe someone finds this helpful.

Known issues: Lacks support for send() and various corner cases described in PEP 380. These could be added and I will edit my entry once I get it working.

| improve this answer | |
  • 6
    What is the advantage of this solution, over abernert's earlier, simple solution, where convert to a for loop? – ToolmakerSteve Dec 19 '13 at 5:40
  • This needs to be an ActiveState recipe. – kirbyfan64sos Jan 24 '14 at 18:00
  • Nice implementation. Just remanding that the Trollius project (asyncio for Python < 3.3) does the same, with a From method. Its implementation is certainly production ready. – jsbueno Jan 26 '16 at 16:32
  • Thank you so much, it should be the accepted answer. I know I can do this use abarnert's way. But I want to find more effective way to do this, this is why I come to this page. – yunfan Mar 10 '16 at 4:21
3
0

What about using the definition from pep-380 in order to construct a Python 2 syntax version:

The statement:

RESULT = yield from EXPR

is semantically equivalent to:

_i = iter(EXPR)
try:
    _y = next(_i)
except StopIteration as _e:
    _r = _e.value
else:
    while 1:
        try:
            _s = yield _y
        except GeneratorExit as _e:
            try:
                _m = _i.close
            except AttributeError:
                pass
            else:
                _m()
            raise _e
        except BaseException as _e:
            _x = sys.exc_info()
            try:
                _m = _i.throw
            except AttributeError:
                raise _e
            else:
                try:
                    _y = _m(*_x)
                except StopIteration as _e:
                    _r = _e.value
                    break
        else:
            try:
                if _s is None:
                    _y = next(_i)
                else:
                    _y = _i.send(_s)
            except StopIteration as _e:
                _r = _e.value
                break
RESULT = _r

In a generator, the statement:

return value

is semantically equivalent to

raise StopIteration(value)

except that, as currently, the exception cannot be caught by except clauses within the returning generator.

The StopIteration exception behaves as though defined thusly:

class StopIteration(Exception):

    def __init__(self, *args):
        if len(args) > 0:
            self.value = args[0]
        else:
            self.value = None
        Exception.__init__(self, *args)
| improve this answer | |
0
0

I've found using resource contexts (using the python-resources module) to be an elegant mechanism for implementing subgenerators in Python 2.7. Conveniently I'd already been using the resource contexts anyway.

If in Python 3.3 you would have:

@resources.register_func
def get_a_thing(type_of_thing):
    if type_of_thing is "A":
        yield from complicated_logic_for_handling_a()
    else:
        yield from complicated_logic_for_handling_b()

def complicated_logic_for_handling_a():
    a = expensive_setup_for_a()
    yield a
    expensive_tear_down_for_a()

def complicated_logic_for_handling_b():
    b = expensive_setup_for_b()
    yield b
    expensive_tear_down_for_b()

In Python 2.7 you would have:

@resources.register_func
def get_a_thing(type_of_thing):
    if type_of_thing is "A":
        with resources.complicated_logic_for_handling_a_ctx() as a:
            yield a
    else:
        with resources.complicated_logic_for_handling_b_ctx() as b:
            yield b

@resources.register_func
def complicated_logic_for_handling_a():
    a = expensive_setup_for_a()
    yield a
    expensive_tear_down_for_a()

@resources.register_func
def complicated_logic_for_handling_b():
    b = expensive_setup_for_b()
    yield b
    expensive_tear_down_for_b()

Note how the complicated-logic operations only require the registration as a resource.

| improve this answer | |
  • if the only thing your generator does is yield from another generator (exactly once always) then you could just return that generator instead. get_a_thing could replace both yield from with a return and it'd work just as well. – Tadhg McDonald-Jensen Feb 3 at 18:39

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.