56

With distutils, setuptools, etc. a package version is specified in setup.py:

# file: setup.py
...
setup(
name='foobar',
version='1.0.0',
# other attributes
)

I would like to be able to access the same version number from within the package:

>>> import foobar
>>> foobar.__version__
'1.0.0'

I could add __version__ = '1.0.0' to my package's __init__.py, but I would also like to include additional imports in my package to create a simplified interface to the package:

# file: __init__.py

from foobar import foo
from foobar.bar import Bar

__version__ = '1.0.0'

and

# file: setup.py

from foobar import __version__
...
setup(
name='foobar',
version=__version__,
# other attributes
)

However, these additional imports can cause the installation of foobar to fail if they import other packages that are not yet installed. What is the correct way to share package version with setup.py and the package?

71
+100

Set the version in setup.py only, and read your own version with pkg_resources, effectively querying the setuptools metadata:

file: setup.py

setup(
    name='foobar',
    version='1.0.0',
    # other attributes
)

file: __init__.py

from pkg_resources import get_distribution

__version__ = get_distribution('foobar').version

To make this work in all cases, where you could end up running this without having installed it, test for DistributionNotFound and the distribution location:

from pkg_resources import get_distribution, DistributionNotFound
import os.path

try:
    _dist = get_distribution('foobar')
    # Normalize case for Windows systems
    dist_loc = os.path.normcase(_dist.location)
    here = os.path.normcase(__file__)
    if not here.startswith(os.path.join(dist_loc, 'foobar')):
        # not installed, but there is another version that *is*
        raise DistributionNotFound
except DistributionNotFound:
    __version__ = 'Please install this project with setup.py'
else:
    __version__ = _dist.version
  • 2
    If this actually works reliably, it's much more elegant than my answer ... which makes me wonder why I haven't seen it elsewhere. Does anyone know whether this is a real concern? If it does report the wrong version number, its elegance is neither here nor there ... – Zero Piraeus Jul 14 '13 at 12:46
  • 14
    I don't like this solution: __version__ is resolved at run-time instead of at build-time as it should. IMHO I prefer having a static __version__ inside the source tree, and read it at build-time with some code in setup.py like in the answer below. – Stefano M Dec 30 '14 at 10:30
  • 3
    I mean the difference between __version__ = "x.y.z" (which is parsed once by setup.py at build-time) and __version__ = some_weird_function() which is evaluated at run-time to recover info present only in setup.py and in foobar.egg-info. – Stefano M Dec 30 '14 at 10:47
  • 3
    Agreed: my wording is not correct, as Python is an interpreted language. However it is important to remark the difference between a possible failure at build-time (if setup.py is not able to parse __version__ = 'x.y.z') or at run time (if get_distribution('foobar') fails to recover the correct info.) Your approach of course has many advantages, like the possibility of changing version number at build-time: python setup.py build --tag-date. What has to go into __version__: something burnt into the source tree, or some metadata computed at build-time and recovered at run-time? – Stefano M Dec 30 '14 at 12:36
  • 7
    I have to agree with @StefanoM that this solution is sub-optimal. The reason I find it misleading is that if you have both an installed and a development version on your system, it will always show the installed one, no matter which one is actually imported. – greschd Apr 22 '15 at 13:25
18

I don't believe there's a canonical answer to this, but my method (either directly copied or slightly tweaked from what I've seen in various other places) is as follows:

Folder heirarchy (relevant files only):

package_root/
 |- main_package/
 |   |- __init__.py
 |   `- _version.py
 `- setup.py

main_package/_version.py:

"""Version information."""

# The following line *must* be the last in the module, exactly as formatted:
__version__ = "1.0.0"

main_package/__init__.py:

"""Something nice and descriptive."""

from main_package.some_module import some_function_or_class
# ... etc.
from main_package._version import __version__

__all__ = (
    some_function_or_class,
    # ... etc.
)

setup.py:

from setuptools import setup

setup(
    version=open("main_package/_version.py").readlines()[-1].split()[-1].strip("\"'"),
    # ... etc.
)

... which is ugly as sin ... but it works, and I've seen it or something like it in packages distributed by people who I'd expect to know a better way if there were one.

  • 4
    tl;dr: Don't use imports in setup.py, read the version from a file. I'll have to think about this for a while to decide if I like the approach... – Jace Browning Jul 13 '13 at 17:07
  • 1
    @JaceBrowning yeah, that's a fair summary ... I suspect any solution would have to be a variant of this, since it's importing the package in setup.py that causes problems. – Zero Piraeus Jul 13 '13 at 20:16
  • I wonder if setuptools or distutils has a function to do this more gracefully? – Jace Browning Jul 13 '13 at 20:31
  • 8
    Having __version__ = "x.y.z" in the source and parsing it within setup.py is definitely the correct solution, IMHO. Much better that relying on run time magic. – Stefano M Dec 30 '14 at 10:22
  • And of course you can import re in your setup.py, if you'd like something more elegant or robust. – Stefano M Dec 30 '14 at 10:37
11

I agree with @stefano-m 's philosophy about:

Having version = "x.y.z" in the source and parsing it within setup.py is definitely the correct solution, IMHO. Much better than (the other way around) relying on run time magic.

And this answer is derived from @zero-piraeus 's answer. The whole point is "don't use imports in setup.py, instead, read the version from a file".

I use regex to parse the __version__ so that it does not need to be the last line of a dedicated file at all. In fact, I still put the single-source-of-truth __version__ inside my project's __init__.py.

Folder heirarchy (relevant files only):

package_root/
 |- main_package/
 |   `- __init__.py
 `- setup.py

main_package/__init__.py:

# You can have other dependency if you really need to
from main_package.some_module import some_function_or_class

# Define your version number in the way you mother told you,
# which is so straightforward that even your grandma will understand.
__version__ = "1.2.3"

__all__ = (
    some_function_or_class,
    # ... etc.
)

setup.py:

from setuptools import setup
import re, io

__version__ = re.search(
    r'__version__\s*=\s*[\'"]([^\'"]*)[\'"]',  # It excludes inline comment too
    io.open('main_package/__init__.py', encoding='utf_8_sig').read()
    ).group(1)
# The beautiful part is, I don't even need to check exceptions here.
# If something messes up, let the build process fail noisy, BEFORE my release!

setup(
    version=__version__,
    # ... etc.
)

... which is still not ideal ... but it works.

And by the way, at this point you can test your new toy in this way:

python setup.py --version
1.2.3

PS: This official Python packaging document (and its mirror) describes more options. Its first option is also using regex. (Depends on the exact regex you use, it may or may not handle quotation marks inside version string. Generally not a big issue though.)

PPS: The fix in ADAL Python is now backported into this answer.

  • 1
    Your argument on not importing any package from setup.py and parsing the version manually is so very true. – Alex Sep 29 '16 at 21:20
  • 3
    This seems the most elegant approach to me too. Thanks – Bede Constantinides Nov 15 '16 at 17:12
  • 2
    That link seems some mirror of the (likely) official Python guide here: packaging.python.org/single_source_version – ibic Dec 30 '16 at 2:58
  • @A-B-B Yeah I know. Trying to use descriptive function name to reveal the intention, right? Which is generally a good idea in most cases. But no need to be dogmatic here. Because the pattern of assigning a value to a well-known variable __version__ = blah blah blah already reveals the intention clearly: some version value will be assigned to this variable. I would say it is just personal preference here. – RayLuo Feb 22 '17 at 4:51
  • Thanks @ibic. I've updated the answer with the official link you provided. – RayLuo May 22 '18 at 18:16
3

Put __version__ in your_pkg/__init__.py, and parse in setup.py using ast:

import ast
import importlib.util

from pkg_resources import safe_name

PKG_DIR = 'my_pkg'

def find_version():
    """Return value of __version__.

    Reference: https://stackoverflow.com/a/42269185/
    """
    file_path = importlib.util.find_spec(PKG_DIR).origin
    with open(file_path) as file_obj:
        root_node = ast.parse(file_obj.read())
    for node in ast.walk(root_node):
        if isinstance(node, ast.Assign):
            if len(node.targets) == 1 and node.targets[0].id == "__version__":
                return node.value.s
    raise RuntimeError("Unable to find version string.")

setup(name=safe_name(PKG_DIR),
      version=find_version(),
      packages=[PKG_DIR],
      ...
      )

If using Python < 3.4, note that importlib.util.find_spec is not available. Moreover, any backport of importlib of course cannot be relied upon to be available to setup.py. In this case, use:

import os

file_path = os.path.join(os.path.dirname(__file__), PKG_DIR, '__init__.py')
2

Based on the accepted answer and comments, this is what I ended up doing:

file: setup.py

setup(
    name='foobar',
    version='1.0.0',
    # other attributes
)

file: __init__.py

from pkg_resources import get_distribution, DistributionNotFound

__project__ = 'foobar'
__version__ = None  # required for initial installation

try:
    __version__ = get_distribution(__project__).version
except DistributionNotFound:
    VERSION = __project__ + '-' + '(local)'
else:
    VERSION = __project__ + '-' + __version__
    from foobar import foo
    from foobar.bar import Bar

Explanation:

  • __project__ is the name of the project to install which may be different than the name of the package

  • VERSION is what I display in my command-line interfaces when --version is requested

  • the additional imports (for the simplified package interface) only occur if the project has actually been installed

2

There are several methods proposed in the Packaging guides on python.org.

0

The accepted answer requires that the package has been installed. In my case, I needed to extract the installation params (including __version__) from the source setup.py. I found a direct and simple solution while looking through the tests of the setuptools package. Looking for more info on the _setup_stop_after attribute lead me to an old mailing list post which mentioned distutils.core.run_setup, which lead me to the actual docs needed. After all that, here's the simple solution:

file setup.py:

from setuptools import setup

setup(name='funniest',
      version='0.1',
      description='The funniest joke in the world',
      url='http://github.com/storborg/funniest',
      author='Flying Circus',
      author_email='flyingcircus@example.com',
      license='MIT',
      packages=['funniest'],
      zip_safe=False)

file extract.py:

from distutils.core import run_setup
dist = run_setup('./setup.py', stop_after='init')
dist.get_version()

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