6

I can reliably get a Winsock socket to connect() to itself if I connect to localhost with a port in the range of automatically assigned ephemeral ports (5000–65534). Specifically, Windows appears to have a system-wide rolling port number which is the next port that it will try to assign as a local port number for a client socket. If I create sockets until the assigned number is just below my target port number, and then repeatedly create a socket and attempt to connect to that port number, I can usually get the socket to connect to itself.

I first got it to happen in an application that repeatedly tries to connect to a certain port on localhost, and when the service is not listening it very rarely successfully establishes a connection and receives the message that it initially sent (which happens to be a Redis PING command).

An example, in Python (run with nothing listening to the target port):

import socket

TARGET_PORT = 49400

def mksocket():
    return socket.socket(socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_STREAM, socket.IPPROTO_TCP)

while True:
    sock = mksocket()
    sock.bind(('127.0.0.1', 0))
    host, port = sock.getsockname()
    if port > TARGET_PORT - 10 and port < TARGET_PORT:
        break
    print port

while port < TARGET_PORT:
    sock = mksocket()
    err = None
    try:
        sock.connect(('127.0.0.1', TARGET_PORT))
    except socket.error, e:
        err = e
    host, port = sock.getsockname()
    if err:
        print 'Unable to connect to port %d, used local port %d: %s' % (TARGET_PORT, port, err)
    else:
        print 'Connected to port %d, used local port %d' (TARGET_PORT, port)

On my Mac machine, this eventually terminates with Unable to connect to port 49400, used local port 49400. On my Windows 7 machine, a connection is successfully established and it prints Connected to port 49400, used local port 49400. The resulting socket receives any data that is sent to it.

Is this a bug in Winsock? Is this a bug in my code?

Edit: Here is a screenshot of TcpView with the offending connection shown:

python.exe 8108 TCP (my HOSTNAME) 49400 localhost 49400 ESTABLISHED

2
+50

This appears to be a 'simultaneous initiation' as described in #3.4 of RFC 793. See Figure 8. Note that neither side is in state LISTEN at any stage. In your case, both ends are the same: that would cause it to work exactly as described in the RFC.

  • That certainly explains how TCP doesn't fall over, but it's hardly 'simultaneous' if you have only one socket. Winsock is still doing something out of the ordinary here. – John Calsbeek Jul 18 '13 at 5:16
  • It's simultaneous because the socket has two ports, local and remote, and they are both connecting simultaneously as described. They happen to be the same but there are nevertheless two things happening at once. Otherwise the connection could not complete. Winsock is behaving exactly as described in #3.4 and Figure 8. – user207421 Jul 21 '13 at 5:25
  • Okay, but I can't get this to happen even if I try explicitly on my Mac: I can bind() the socket to a local port but when I try to connect() that same socket to that port I get EINVAL. Surely that's a textbook "simultaneous initiation with one socket" scenario. – John Calsbeek Jul 21 '13 at 17:09
0

It is a logic bug in your code.

First off, only newer versions of Windows use 5000–65534 as ephemeral ports. Older versions used 1025-5000 instead.

You are creating multiple sockets that are explicitly bound to random ephemeral ports until you have bound a socket that is within 10 ports less than your target port. However, if any of those sockets happen to actually bind to the actual target port, you ignore that and keep looping. So you may or may end up with a socket that is bound to the target port, and you may or may not end up with a final port value that is actually less than the target port.

After that, if port happens to be less than your target port (which is not guaranteed), you are then creating more sockets that are implicitly bound to different random available ephemeral ports when calling connect() (it does an implicit bind() internally if bind() has not been called yet), none of which will be the same ephemeral ports that you explicitly bound to since those ports are already in use and cannot be used again.

At no point do you have any given socket connecting from an ephemeral port to the same ephemeral port. And unless another app happens to have bound itself to your target port and is actively listening on that port, then there is no way that connect() can be successfully connecting to the target port on any of the sockets you create, since none of them are in the listening state. And getsockname() is not valid on an unbound socket, and a connecting socket is not guaranteed to be bound if connect() fails. So the symptoms you think are happening are actually physically impossible given the code you have shown. Your logging is simply making the wrong assumptions and thus is logging the wrong things, giving you a false state of being.

Try something more like this instead, and you will see what the real ports are:

import socket

TARGET_PORT = 49400

def mksocket():
    return socket.socket(socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_STREAM, socket.IPPROTO_TCP)

while True:
    sock = mksocket()
    sock.bind(('127.0.0.1', 0))
    host, port = sock.getsockname()
    print 'Bound to local port %d' % (port)
    if port > TARGET_PORT - 10 and port < TARGET_PORT:
        break

if port >= TARGET_PORT:
    print 'Bound port %d exceeded target port %d' % (port, TARGET_PORT)
else:
    while port < TARGET_PORT:
      sock = mksocket()
      # connect() would do this internal anyway, so this is just to ensure a port is available for logging even if connect() fails
      sock.bind(('127.0.0.1', 0))
      err = None
      try:
          sock.connect(('127.0.0.1', TARGET_PORT))
      except socket.error, e:
          err = e
      host, port = sock.getsockname()
      if err:
          print 'Unable to connect to port %d using local port %d' % (TARGET_PORT, port)
      else:
          print 'Connected to port %d using local port %d' % (TARGET_PORT, port)
  • Python is closing the sockets when they are overwritten, so it's in theory possible to reuse the ports (though they end up in TIME_WAIT state and probably won't be reused anyway). And I'm aware that it is undefined if this script does what I want it to do every time, it just normally behaves like I am describing. At least on Windows I can't call getsockname() before connect, but I can call it after connect (even if it fails). Even if it is undefined, Windows does appear to let the implicit bind succeed even if no connection is established. – John Calsbeek Jul 11 '13 at 4:50
  • I should also clarify that I have made this scenario appear in another program by using only the first loop, "priming" the current ephemeral port, and have checked TcpView (from Sysinternals) and verified that there is in fact a port with both remote and local ports identical. I don't believe your claim in the fifth paragraph is accurate. (I will try running your modified script tomorrow.) – John Calsbeek Jul 11 '13 at 4:52
  • @JohnCalsbeek: yes, the closed ports would be in a TIME_WAIT state and not be reusable for several minutes, unless linger is turned off before they are closed, or they are opened with the SO_REUSEADDR option enabled. Yes, you cannot call getsockname() on an unbound socket, and calling connect() on an unbound socket will bind it only if the connection is successful. There is no guarantee that the socket will be bound if connect() fails. – Remy Lebeau Jul 11 '13 at 5:45
  • I ran your altered script and got the same result: Connected to port 49400 using local port 49400. Your new print was never triggered. In addition, I ran TcpView and got a screenshot of the established self-connected socket, which I edited into my question. There's definitely seems to be something funky going on, not just my logging being screwed up. – John Calsbeek Jul 11 '13 at 17:53

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