201

Basically when I do the following query, if no leads were matched the following query throws an exception. In that case I'd prefer to have the sum equalize 0 rather than an exception being thrown. Would this be possible in the query itself - I mean rather than storing the query and checking query.Any() ?

double earnings = db.Leads.Where(l => l.Date.Day == date.Day
                && l.Date.Month == date.Month
                && l.Date.Year == date.Year
                && l.Property.Type == ProtectedPropertyType.Password
                && l.Property.PropertyId == PropertyId).Sum(l => l.Amount);
6
  • 2
    The Where wouldn't be returning null if it didn't find any records, it would return a list of zero items. What is the exception? – Mike Perrenoud Jul 11 '13 at 12:30
  • 3
    What is the exception ? – Toto Jul 11 '13 at 12:30
  • 4
    I get the exception: The cast to value type 'Int32' failed because the materialized value is null. Either the result type's generic parameter or the query must use a nullable type. – John Mayer Jul 11 '13 at 12:35
  • 1
    @Stijn, no what you did still wouldn't have worked. The issue is the way the SQL is generated. Amount isn't actually null, it's really a problem surrounding how it handles zero results. Have a look at the answer that was provided. – Mike Perrenoud Jul 11 '13 at 12:41
  • 44
    You shouldn't be using double for dollar amounts! Even fractional dollar amounts. Never, ever, ever use double when an exact amount is intended. Your database columns should be decimal, your code should use decimal. Forget you ever knew of float and double in your programming career until the day someone tells you to use them, for statistics or star luminance or the results of a stochastic process or charge of an electron! Until then, you're doing it wrong. – ErikE Oct 27 '15 at 17:48
419

Try changing your query to this:

db.Leads.Where(l => l.Date.Day == date.Day
            && l.Date.Month == date.Month
            && l.Date.Year == date.Year
            && l.Property.Type == ProtectedPropertyType.Password
            && l.Property.PropertyId == PropertyId)
         .Select(l => l.Amount)
         .DefaultIfEmpty(0)
         .Sum();

This way, your query will only select the Amount field. If the collection is empty, it will return one element with the value of 0 and then the sum will be applied.

6
  • It surely does the trick, but wouldn't it select a list of Amount values first and Sum them on the server side, instead of on the database side? imo 2kay's solution is more optimal, at least more semantically correct. – Maksim Vi. Aug 10 '15 at 23:43
  • 3
    @MaksimVI EF will generate the query upon the first materialization, when the IQueryable<T> chain stops (typically when you call ToList, AsEnumerable, etc.. and in this case Sum). Sum is a known and handled method by the EF Queryable Provider and will generate the related SQL statement. – Simon Belanger Aug 11 '15 at 1:52
  • 2
    @SimonBelanger I stand corrected, the sum is made on DB side, but it's made on a subquery that selects Amounts first. Basically the query is SELECT SUM(a.Amount) FROM (SELECT Amount FROM Leads WHERE ...) AS a instead of just SELECT SUM(Amount) FROM Leads. Also the subquery has an additional null check and a weird outer join with a single row table. – Maksim Vi. Aug 11 '15 at 21:17
  • Not a significant performance difference and it's probably optimized, but i still think the other solution looks cleaner. – Maksim Vi. Aug 11 '15 at 21:29
  • 5
    Be aware that DefaultIfEmpty is not supported by a number of LINQ providers so you would need to throw in a ToList() or something similar prior to using it in those cases so that it would be applied in the LINQ to Objects scenario. – Christopher King Aug 17 '17 at 13:06
202

I prefer to use another hack:

double earnings = db.Leads.Where(l => l.Date.Day == date.Day
                                      && l.Date.Month == date.Month
                                      && l.Date.Year == date.Year
                                      && l.Property.Type == ProtectedPropertyType.Password
                                      && l.Property.PropertyId == PropertyId)
                          .Sum(l => (double?) l.Amount) ?? 0;
11
  • 20
    When using Linq to SQL this generates a much shorter SQL code than the accepted answer – wertzui Oct 24 '14 at 7:22
  • 3
    This is the correct answer. All others fail. First casting to nullable and then comparing the final result against null. – Mohsen Afshin Sep 17 '15 at 4:37
  • 3
    This is much better than the accepted answer for Linq To EF. For me the generated SQL performs about 3.8 times better than DefaultIfEmpty. – Florian Jul 22 '16 at 9:49
  • 3
    This is MUCH FASTER. – frakon Oct 14 '16 at 12:47
  • 1
    i wouldn't call this a hack, as this is the exact use nullables are designed for, ie showing the difference between no data and default value – MikeT Jul 6 '17 at 12:00
7

Try this instead, it's shorter:

db.Leads.Where(..).Aggregate(0, (i, lead) => i + lead.Amount);
2
  • 2
    Does this avoid the exception? – Adrian Wragg Sep 10 '14 at 12:03
  • could you elaborate? – DanielV May 22 '18 at 15:50
4

That's win for me:

int Total = 0;
Total = (int)Db.Logins.Where(L => L.id == item.MyId).Sum(L => (int?)L.NumberOfLogins ?? 0);

In my LOGIN table, in field NUMBEROFLOGINS some values are NULL and others have an INT number. I sum here total NUMBEROFLOGINS of all users of one Corporation (Each Id).

3

Try:

double earnings = db.Leads.Where(l => l.ShouldBeIncluded).Sum(l => (double?) l.Amount) ?? 0;

The query "SELECT SUM([Amount])" will return NULL for empty list. But if you use LINQ it expects that the "Sum(l => l.Amount)" returns double and it doesn't allow you to use "??" operator to set 0 for empty collection.

In order to avoid this situation you need to make LINQ expect "double?". You can do it by casting "(double?)l.Amount".

It doesn't affect the query to SQL but it makes LINQ working for empty collections.

0
db.Leads.Where(l => l.Date.Day == date.Day
        && l.Date.Month == date.Month
        && l.Date.Year == date.Year
        && l.Property.Type == ProtectedPropertyType.Password
        && l.Property.PropertyId == PropertyId)
     .Select(l => l.Amount)
     .ToList()
     .Sum();
3
  • 1
    Please add some information to the answer about the code – Jaqen H'ghar Jun 24 '16 at 21:40
  • 1
    I got error when I try without ToList(), since it returns nothing. But the ToList() will make the empty list and it is not giving any error when I do ToList().Sum(). – Mona Aug 4 '16 at 10:38
  • 2
    You probably would not want to use ToList here if all you want is the sum. This will return the entire result set (just Amount for each record in this case) into memory and then Sum() that set. Much better to use another solution which does the calculation via SQL Server. – Josh M. Jul 24 '17 at 23:46

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