72

Often I need to output data either to file or, if file is not specified, to stdout. I use the following snippet:

if target:
    with open(target, 'w') as h:
        h.write(content)
else:
    sys.stdout.write(content)

I would like to rewrite it and handle both targets uniformly.

In ideal case it would be:

with open(target, 'w') as h:
    h.write(content)

but this will not work well because sys.stdout is be closed when leaving with block and I don't want that. I neither want to

stdout = open(target, 'w')
...

because I would need to remember to restore original stdout.

Related:

Edit

I know that I can wrap target, define separate function or use context manager. I look for a simple, elegant, idiomatic solution fitting that wouldn't require more than 5 lines

  • Too bad you didn't add the edit earlier ;) Anyhow... alternatively you can simply not bother to cleanup your open file :P – Wolph Jul 11 '13 at 20:37

10 Answers 10

70

Just thinking outside of the box here, how about a custom open() method?

import sys
import contextlib

@contextlib.contextmanager
def smart_open(filename=None):
    if filename and filename != '-':
        fh = open(filename, 'w')
    else:
        fh = sys.stdout

    try:
        yield fh
    finally:
        if fh is not sys.stdout:
            fh.close()

Use it like this:

# writes to some_file
with smart_open('some_file') as fh:
    print >>fh, 'some output'

# writes to stdout
with smart_open() as fh:
    print >>fh, 'some output'

# writes to stdout
with smart_open('-') as fh:
    print >>fh, 'some output'
26

Stick with your current code. It's simple and you can tell exactly what it's doing just by glancing at it.

Another way would be with an inline if:

handle = open(target, 'w') if target else sys.stdout
handle.write(content)

if handle is not sys.stdout:
    handle.close()

But that isn't much shorter than what you have and it looks arguably worse.

You could also make sys.stdout unclosable, but that doesn't seem too Pythonic:

sys.stdout.close = lambda: None

with (open(target, 'w') if target else sys.stdout) as handle:
    handle.write(content)
  • 1
    You can keep unclosability for as long as you need it by making a context manager for it as well: with unclosable(sys.stdout): ... by setting sys.stdout.close = lambda: None inside this context manager and resetting it to the old value afterwards. But this seems a little bit too far fetched... – glglgl Jul 11 '13 at 21:14
  • 1
    I'm torn between voting up for "leave it, you can tell exactly what it's doing" and voting down for the horrendous unclosable suggestion! – GreenAsJade Jul 22 '16 at 5:46
6

Why LBYL when you can EAFP?

try:
    with open(target, 'w') as h:
        h.write(content)
except TypeError:
    sys.stdout.write(content)

Why rewrite it to use the with/as block uniformly when you have to make it work in a convoluted way? You'll add more lines and reduce performance.

  • 3
    Exceptions should not be used to control "normal" flow of the routine. Performance? will bubbling-up an error be faster that if/else? – Jakub M. Jul 11 '13 at 20:36
  • 1
    Depends on the probability that you'll be using one or the other. – 2rs2ts Jul 11 '13 at 20:37
  • 23
    @JakubM. Exceptions can, should be and are used like this in Python. – Gareth Latty Jul 11 '13 at 20:51
  • 8
    Considering that Python's for loop exits by catching a StopIteration error thrown by the iterator it's looping across, I'd say that using exceptions for flow control is utterly Pythonic. – Kirk Strauser Jul 11 '13 at 22:01
  • 1
    Assuming that target is None when sys.stdout is intended, you need to catch TypeError rather than IOError. – torek Jul 12 '13 at 1:17
3

An improvement of Wolph's answer

import sys
import contextlib

@contextlib.contextmanager
def smart_open(filename: str = None, mode: str = 'r', *args, **kwargs):
    if filename == '-':
        if 'r' in mode:
            stream = sys.stdin
        else:
            stream = sys.stdout
        if 'b' in mode:
            fh = stream.buffer
        else:
            fh = stream
    else:
        fh = open(filename, mode, *args, **kwargs)

    try:
        yield fh
    finally:
        try:
            fh.close()
        except AttributeError:
            pass

This allows binary IO and pass eventual extraneous arguments to open if filename is indeed a file name.

2

I'd also go for a simple wrapper function, which can be pretty simple if you can ignore the mode (and consequently stdin vs. stdout), for example:

from contextlib import contextmanager
import sys

@contextmanager
def open_or_stdout(filename):
    if filename != '-':
        with open(filename, 'w') as f:
            yield f
    else:
        yield sys.stdout
  • This solution doesn't explicitly close the file either on normal or error termination of the with clause so its not much of a context manager. A class that implements enter and exit would be a better choice. – tdelaney Jul 11 '13 at 21:48
  • 1
    I get ValueError: I/O operation on closed file if I try to write to the file outside the with open_or_stdout(..) block. What am I missing? sys.stdout is not meant to be closed. – Tommi Komulainen Jul 12 '13 at 7:35
2

Another possible solution: do not try to avoid the context manager exit method, just duplicate stdout.

with (os.fdopen(os.dup(sys.stdout.fileno()), 'w')
      if target == '-'
      else open(target, 'w')) as f:
      f.write("Foo")
1

Okay, if we are getting into one-liner wars, here's:

(target and open(target, 'w') or sys.stdout).write(content)

I like Jacob's original example as long as context is only written in one place. It would be a problem if you end up re-opening the file for many writes. I think I would just make the decision once at the top of the script and let the system close the file on exit:

output = target and open(target, 'w') or sys.stdout
...
output.write('thing one\n')
...
output.write('thing two\n')

You could include your own exit handler if you think its more tidy

import atexit

def cleanup_output():
    global output
    if output is not sys.stdout:
        output.close()

atexit(cleanup_output)
  • I don't think your one-liner closes the file object. Am I wrong? – 2rs2ts Jul 11 '13 at 22:00
  • 1
    @2rs2ts - It does... conditionally. The file object's refcount goes to zero because there are no variables pointing to it, so it is available to have its __del__ method called either immediately (in cpython) or later when garbage collection happens. There are warnings in the doc not to trust that this will always work but I use it all the time in shorter scripts. Something big that runs a long time and opens lots of files... well I guess I'd use 'with' or 'try/finally'. – tdelaney Jul 11 '13 at 22:07
  • TIL. I didn't know that file objects' __del__ would do that. – 2rs2ts Jul 11 '13 at 22:10
  • @2rs2ts: CPython uses a reference-counting garbage collector (with a "real" GC underneath invoked as needed) so it can close the file as soon as you drop all references to the stream-handle. Jython and apparently IronPython only have the "real" GC so they don't close the file until an eventual GC. – torek Jul 12 '13 at 1:40
1

How about opening a new fd for sys.stdout? This way you won't have any problems closing it:

if not target:
    target = "/dev/stdout"
with open(target, 'w') as f:
    f.write(content)
  • 1
    Sadly, running this python script needs a sudo on my install. /dev/stdout is owned by root. – Manur Nov 30 '15 at 15:57
  • In many situations, re-opening an fd to stdout is not what's expected. For example, this code will truncate stdout, thus making shell things like ./script.py >> file overwrite the file instead of appending to it. – salicideblock Mar 7 '18 at 13:55
0

If you really must insist on something more "elegant", i.e. a one-liner:

>>> import sys
>>> target = "foo.txt"
>>> content = "foo"
>>> (lambda target, content: (lambda target, content: filter(lambda h: not h.write(content), (target,))[0].close())(open(target, 'w'), content) if target else sys.stdout.write(content))(target, content)

foo.txt appears and contains the text foo.

  • This should be moved to CodeGolf StackExchange :D – kaiser Jul 3 '18 at 20:39
0
if (out != sys.stdout):
    with open(out, 'wb') as f:
        f.write(data)
else:
    out.write(data)

Slight improvement in some cases.

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