In Go, a string is a primitive type, which means it is read-only, and every manipulation of it will create a new string.

So if I want to concatenate strings many times without knowing the length of the resulting string, what's the best way to do it?

The naive way would be:

s := ""
for i := 0; i < 1000; i++ {
    s += getShortStringFromSomewhere()
}
return s

but that does not seem very efficient.

  • 4
    One more bench – Ivan Black Dec 15 '15 at 5:47
  • Note: This question and most answers seem to have been written before append() came into the language, which is a good solution for this. It will perform fast like copy() but will grow the slice first even if that means allocating a new backing array if the capacity isn't enough. bytes.Buffer still makes sense if you want its additional convenience methods or if the package you're using expects it. – thomasrutter Aug 10 '17 at 1:29
  • 1
    7years 9 months ago?! Cmon man – Darshan Chaudhary Aug 14 '17 at 17:39
  • 1
    It doesn't just "seem very inefficient"; it has a specific problem that every new non-CS hire we have ever gotten runs into in the first few weeks on the job. It's quadratic - O(n*n). Think of the number sequence: 1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + .... It's n*(n+1)/2, the area of a triangle of base n. You allocate size 1, then size 2, then size 3, etc when you append immutable strings in a loop. This quadratic resource consumption manifests itself in more ways than just this. – Rob Nov 16 '17 at 15:22

20 Answers 20

up vote 712 down vote accepted

The best way is to use the bytes package. It has a Buffer type which implements io.Writer.

package main

import (
    "bytes"
    "fmt"
)

func main() {
    var buffer bytes.Buffer

    for i := 0; i < 1000; i++ {
        buffer.WriteString("a")
    }

    fmt.Println(buffer.String())
}

This does it in O(n) time.

Note added in 2018

From Go 1.10 there is the strings.Builder type, which achieves this even more efficiently (for strings). The example given there is succinct and easy to copy/adapt.

This is analogous to the StringBuilder class in Java.

  • 26
    Is this technique Unicode-clean? – Kevin Reid Oct 27 '11 at 1:49
  • 55
    Yes. Almost everything in Go is Unicode-clean. – Mostafa Jan 30 '12 at 7:39
  • 22
    instead of println(string(buffer.Bytes())); use could just do println(buffer.String()) – FigmentEngine Feb 13 '12 at 4:52
  • 20
    Instead of buffer := bytes.NewBufferString(""), you can do var buffer bytes.Buffer. You also don't need any of those semicolons :). – crazy2be Jun 9 '12 at 23:52
  • 54
    Incredibly fast. Made some naive "+" string concat in my program go from 3 minutes to 1.3 seconds. – Malcolm Sep 17 '13 at 16:34

The most efficient way to concatenate strings is using the builtin function copy. In my tests, that approach is ~3x faster than using bytes.Buffer and much much faster (~12,000x) than using the operator +. Also, it uses less memory.

I've created a test case to prove this and here are the results:

BenchmarkConcat  1000000    64497 ns/op   502018 B/op   0 allocs/op
BenchmarkBuffer  100000000  15.5  ns/op   2 B/op        0 allocs/op
BenchmarkCopy    500000000  5.39  ns/op   0 B/op        0 allocs/op

Below is code for testing:

package main

import (
    "bytes"
    "strings"
    "testing"
)

func BenchmarkConcat(b *testing.B) {
    var str string
    for n := 0; n < b.N; n++ {
        str += "x"
    }
    b.StopTimer()

    if s := strings.Repeat("x", b.N); str != s {
        b.Errorf("unexpected result; got=%s, want=%s", str, s)
    }
}

func BenchmarkBuffer(b *testing.B) {
    var buffer bytes.Buffer
    for n := 0; n < b.N; n++ {
        buffer.WriteString("x")
    }
    b.StopTimer()

    if s := strings.Repeat("x", b.N); buffer.String() != s {
        b.Errorf("unexpected result; got=%s, want=%s", buffer.String(), s)
    }
}

func BenchmarkCopy(b *testing.B) {
    bs := make([]byte, b.N)
    bl := 0

    b.ResetTimer()
    for n := 0; n < b.N; n++ {
        bl += copy(bs[bl:], "x")
    }
    b.StopTimer()

    if s := strings.Repeat("x", b.N); string(bs) != s {
        b.Errorf("unexpected result; got=%s, want=%s", string(bs), s)
    }
}

// Go 1.10
func BenchmarkStringBuilder(b *testing.B) {
    var strBuilder strings.Builder

    b.ResetTimer()
    for n := 0; n < b.N; n++ {
        strBuilder.WriteString("x")
    }
    b.StopTimer()

    if s := strings.Repeat("x", b.N); strBuilder.String() != s {
        b.Errorf("unexpected result; got=%s, want=%s", strBuilder.String(), s)
    }
}
  • 27
    great answer, I wish every question like this would contain an embedded mini-benchmark! – colthreepv Jun 7 '14 at 0:40
  • 6
    The bytes.Buffer should do basically the same as the copy (with some extra bookkeeping I guess) and the speed isn't that different. So I'd use that :). The difference being that the buffer starts with 0 bytes so it has to reallocate (this make it seem a little slower I guess). Easier to use, though. – Aktau Jun 27 '14 at 12:50
  • 5
    buffer.Write (bytes) is 30% faster than buffer.WriteString. [useful if you can get the data as []byte] – Dani-Br Jul 6 '15 at 0:21
  • 22
    Note that the benchmark results are distorted and are not authentic. Different benchmark functions will be called with different values of b.N, and so you're not comparing the execution time of the same task to be carried out (e.g. one function might append 1,000 strings, another one might append 10,000 which can make a big difference in the average time of 1 append, in BenchmarkConcat() for example). You should use the same append count in each case (certainly not b.N), and do all the concatenation inside the body of the for ranging to b.N (that is, 2 for loops embedded). – icza Dec 4 '15 at 8:01
  • 14
    Additionally, the copy benchmark is skewed by explicitly ignoring the time that the allocation takes, which is included in the other benchmarks. – gha.st Dec 28 '15 at 19:40

There is a library function in the strings package called Join: http://golang.org/pkg/strings/#Join

A look at the code of Join shows a similar approach to Append function Kinopiko wrote: https://golang.org/src/strings/strings.go#L420

Usage:

import (
    "fmt";
    "strings";
)

func main() {
    s := []string{"this", "is", "a", "joined", "string\n"};
    fmt.Printf(strings.Join(s, " "));
}

$ ./test.bin
this is a joined string
  • 20
    Doesn't work when you have to loop over something that isn't a []string. – Malcolm Sep 17 '13 at 16:34

Beginning with Go 1.10 there is a strings.Builder, here.

A Builder is used to efficiently build a string using Write methods. It minimizes memory copying. The zero value is ready to use.


Usage:

It's almost the same with bytes.Buffer.

package main

import (
    "strings"
    "fmt"
)

func main() {
    var str strings.Builder

    for i := 0; i < 1000; i++ {
        str.WriteString("a")
    }

    fmt.Println(str.String())
}

StringBuilder methods and interfaces it supports:

Its methods are being implemented with the existing interfaces in mind so that you can switch to the new Builder easily in your code.


Zero value usage:

var sb strings.Builder

Differences from bytes.Buffer:

  • It's immutable and it can only grow or reset.

  • In bytes.Buffer underlying bytes can escape like this: (*Buffer).Bytes(); strings.Builder prevents this problem.

  • It also has a copyCheck mechanism inside which prevents accidentially copying it (func (b *Builder) copyCheck() { ... }).


Check out its source code here.

  • 2
    What do you mean by 'escape'? Do you mean escapes in the string, or just that the underlying bytes can be exposed? – makhdumi Mar 6 at 23:43
  • @makhdumi Yes, 2nd, exposure of underlying bytes. – Inanc Gumus Mar 7 at 1:55
  • 2
    This now should be marked as the answer. – Ahmet Alp Balkan - Google Apr 3 at 0:58

I just benchmarked the top answer posted above in my own code (a recursive tree walk) and the simple concat operator is actually faster than the BufferString.

func (r *record) String() string {
    buffer := bytes.NewBufferString("");
    fmt.Fprint(buffer,"(",r.name,"[")
    for i := 0; i < len(r.subs); i++ {
        fmt.Fprint(buffer,"\t",r.subs[i])
    }
    fmt.Fprint(buffer,"]",r.size,")\n")
    return buffer.String()
}

This took 0.81s, whereas the following code:

func (r *record) String() string {
    s := "(\"" + r.name + "\" ["
    for i := 0; i < len(r.subs); i++ {
        s += r.subs[i].String()
    }
    s += "] " + strconv.FormatInt(r.size,10) + ")\n"
    return s
} 

only took 0.61s. This is probably due to the overhead of creating the new BufferStrings.

Update: I also benchmarked the join function and it ran in 0.54s

func (r *record) String() string {
    var parts []string
    parts = append(parts, "(\"", r.name, "\" [" )
    for i := 0; i < len(r.subs); i++ {
        parts = append(parts, r.subs[i].String())
    }
    parts = append(parts, strconv.FormatInt(r.size,10), ")\n")
    return strings.Join(parts,"")
}
  • 5
    I believe the OP was more concerned about memory complexity rather than runtime complexity, given the fact that naive string concatenations result in new memory allocations each time. – galaktor Aug 16 '12 at 19:30
  • 14
    The slow speed of this might well be related to using fmt.Fprint instead of buffer.WriteString("\t"); buffer.WriteString(subs[i]); – Robert Jack Will Aug 13 '13 at 9:04
  • I am glad to know that my preferred method of (strings.Join) run as the fastest while from this saying that (bytes.Buffer) is the winner! – Chetabahana Mar 22 '15 at 21:26

This is the fastest solution that does not require you to know or calculate the overall buffer size first:

var data []byte
for i := 0; i < 1000; i++ {
    data = append(data, getShortStringFromSomewhere()...)
}
return string(data)

By my benchmark, it's 20% slower than the copy solution (8.1ns per append rather than 6.72ns) but still 55% faster than using bytes.Buffer.

You could create a big slice of bytes and copy the bytes of the short strings into it using string slices. There is a function given in "Effective Go":

func Append(slice, data[]byte) []byte {
    l := len(slice);
    if l + len(data) > cap(slice) { // reallocate
        // Allocate double what's needed, for future growth.
        newSlice := make([]byte, (l+len(data))*2);
        // Copy data (could use bytes.Copy()).
        for i, c := range slice {
            newSlice[i] = c
        }
        slice = newSlice;
    }
    slice = slice[0:l+len(data)];
    for i, c := range data {
        slice[l+i] = c
    }
    return slice;
}

Then when the operations are finished, use string ( ) on the big slice of bytes to convert it into a string again.

  • It's interesting that there are so many ways to do this in Go. – Yitzhak Nov 16 '12 at 5:21
  • 10
    In effective go, it also says that the idea is so useful it was captured in a builtin. So you can replace your function with append(slice, byte...), it seems. – Aktau Jun 27 '14 at 12:52

Update 2018-04-03

As of Go 1.10, string.Builder is recommended to be a replacement for bytes.Buffer. Check 1.10 release notes

A new type Builder is a replacement for bytes.Buffer for the use case of accumulating text into a string result. The Builder's API is a restricted subset of bytes.Buffer's that allows it to safely avoid making a duplicate copy of the data during the String method.

============================================================

The benchmark code of @cd1 and other answers are wrong. b.N is not supposed to be set in benchmark function. It's set by the go test tool dynamically to determine if the execution time of the test is stable.

A benchmark function should run the same test b.N times and the test inside the loop should be the same for each iteration. So I fix it by adding an inner loop. I also add benchmarks for some other solutions:

package main

import (
    "bytes"
    "strings"
    "testing"
)

const (
    sss = "xfoasneobfasieongasbg"
    cnt = 10000
)

var (
    bbb      = []byte(sss)
    expected = strings.Repeat(sss, cnt)
)

func BenchmarkCopyPreAllocate(b *testing.B) {
    var result string
    for n := 0; n < b.N; n++ {
        bs := make([]byte, cnt*len(sss))
        bl := 0
        for i := 0; i < cnt; i++ {
            bl += copy(bs[bl:], sss)
        }
        result = string(bs)
    }
    b.StopTimer()
    if result != expected {
        b.Errorf("unexpected result; got=%s, want=%s", string(result), expected)
    }
}

func BenchmarkAppendPreAllocate(b *testing.B) {
    var result string
    for n := 0; n < b.N; n++ {
        data := make([]byte, 0, cnt*len(sss))
        for i := 0; i < cnt; i++ {
            data = append(data, sss...)
        }
        result = string(data)
    }
    b.StopTimer()
    if result != expected {
        b.Errorf("unexpected result; got=%s, want=%s", string(result), expected)
    }
}

func BenchmarkBufferPreAllocate(b *testing.B) {
    var result string
    for n := 0; n < b.N; n++ {
        buf := bytes.NewBuffer(make([]byte, 0, cnt*len(sss)))
        for i := 0; i < cnt; i++ {
            buf.WriteString(sss)
        }
        result = buf.String()
    }
    b.StopTimer()
    if result != expected {
        b.Errorf("unexpected result; got=%s, want=%s", string(result), expected)
    }
}

func BenchmarkCopy(b *testing.B) {
    var result string
    for n := 0; n < b.N; n++ {
        data := make([]byte, 0, 64) // same size as bootstrap array of bytes.Buffer
        for i := 0; i < cnt; i++ {
            off := len(data)
            if off+len(sss) > cap(data) {
                temp := make([]byte, 2*cap(data)+len(sss))
                copy(temp, data)
                data = temp
            }
            data = data[0 : off+len(sss)]
            copy(data[off:], sss)
        }
        result = string(data)
    }
    b.StopTimer()
    if result != expected {
        b.Errorf("unexpected result; got=%s, want=%s", string(result), expected)
    }
}

func BenchmarkAppend(b *testing.B) {
    var result string
    for n := 0; n < b.N; n++ {
        data := make([]byte, 0, 64)
        for i := 0; i < cnt; i++ {
            data = append(data, sss...)
        }
        result = string(data)
    }
    b.StopTimer()
    if result != expected {
        b.Errorf("unexpected result; got=%s, want=%s", string(result), expected)
    }
}

func BenchmarkBufferWrite(b *testing.B) {
    var result string
    for n := 0; n < b.N; n++ {
        var buf bytes.Buffer
        for i := 0; i < cnt; i++ {
            buf.Write(bbb)
        }
        result = buf.String()
    }
    b.StopTimer()
    if result != expected {
        b.Errorf("unexpected result; got=%s, want=%s", string(result), expected)
    }
}

func BenchmarkBufferWriteString(b *testing.B) {
    var result string
    for n := 0; n < b.N; n++ {
        var buf bytes.Buffer
        for i := 0; i < cnt; i++ {
            buf.WriteString(sss)
        }
        result = buf.String()
    }
    b.StopTimer()
    if result != expected {
        b.Errorf("unexpected result; got=%s, want=%s", string(result), expected)
    }
}

func BenchmarkConcat(b *testing.B) {
    var result string
    for n := 0; n < b.N; n++ {
        var str string
        for i := 0; i < cnt; i++ {
            str += sss
        }
        result = str
    }
    b.StopTimer()
    if result != expected {
        b.Errorf("unexpected result; got=%s, want=%s", string(result), expected)
    }
}

Environment is OS X 10.11.6, 2.2 GHz Intel Core i7

Test results:

BenchmarkCopyPreAllocate-8         20000             84208 ns/op          425984 B/op          2 allocs/op
BenchmarkAppendPreAllocate-8       10000            102859 ns/op          425984 B/op          2 allocs/op
BenchmarkBufferPreAllocate-8       10000            166407 ns/op          426096 B/op          3 allocs/op
BenchmarkCopy-8                    10000            160923 ns/op          933152 B/op         13 allocs/op
BenchmarkAppend-8                  10000            175508 ns/op         1332096 B/op         24 allocs/op
BenchmarkBufferWrite-8             10000            239886 ns/op          933266 B/op         14 allocs/op
BenchmarkBufferWriteString-8       10000            236432 ns/op          933266 B/op         14 allocs/op
BenchmarkConcat-8                     10         105603419 ns/op        1086685168 B/op    10000 allocs/op

Conclusion:

  1. CopyPreAllocate is the fastest way; AppendPreAllocate is pretty close to No.1, but it's easier to write the code.
  2. Concat has really bad performance both for speed and memory usage. Don't use it.
  3. Buffer#Write and Buffer#WriteString are basically the same in speed, contrary to what @Dani-Br said in the comment. Considering string is indeed []byte in Go, it makes sense.
  4. bytes.Buffer basically use the same solution as Copy with extra book keeping and other stuff.
  5. Copy and Append use a bootstrap size of 64, the same as bytes.Buffer
  6. Append use more memory and allocs, I think it's related to the grow algorithm it use. It's not growing memory as fast as bytes.Buffer

Suggestion:

  1. For simple task such as what OP wants, I would use Append or AppendPreAllocate. It's fast enough and easy to use.
  2. If need to read and write the buffer at the same time, use bytes.Buffer of course. That's what it's designed for.
package main

import (
  "fmt"
)

func main() {
    var str1 = "string1"
    var str2 = "string2"
    out := fmt.Sprintf("%s %s ",str1, str2)
    fmt.Println(out)
}
  • 2
    Welcome to Stack Overflow! Take a moment to read through the editing help in the help center. Formatting on Stack Overflow is different than other sites. – Rizier123 Mar 6 '16 at 20:40
  • 1
    While this code snippet may solve the question, including an explanation really helps to improve the quality of your post. Remember that you are answering the question for readers in the future, and those people might not know the reasons for your code suggestion. Please also try not to crowd your code with explanatory comments, this reduces the readability of both the code and the explanations! – Rizier123 Mar 6 '16 at 20:40
  • Simple solution 👍 – Finn Aug 31 '17 at 4:56

My original suggestion was

s12 := fmt.Sprint(s1,s2)

But above answer using bytes.Buffer - WriteString() is the most efficient way.

My initial suggestion uses reflection and a type switch. See (p *pp) doPrint and (p *pp) printArg
There is no universal Stringer() interface for basic types, as I had naively thought.

At least though, Sprint() internally uses a bytes.Buffer. Thus

`s12 := fmt.Sprint(s1,s2,s3,s4,...,s1000)`

is acceptable in terms of memory allocations.

=> Sprint() concatenation can be used for quick debug output.
=> Otherwise use bytes.Buffer ... WriteString

  • 7
    It's not built in and it's not efficient. – peterSO Jul 2 '13 at 14:38
  • Importing a package (like fmt) means it's not builtin. It's in the standard library. – Malcolm Sep 17 '13 at 16:33
  • It's slow only because it uses reflection on it's arguments. It's efficent. Otherwise it's not less efficient than joining with strings.Join – ithkuil Nov 11 '13 at 17:07

Expanding on cd1's answer: You might use append() instead of copy(). append() makes ever bigger advance provisions, costing a little more memory, but saving time. I added two more benchmarks at the top of yours. Run locally with

go test -bench=. -benchtime=100ms

On my thinkpad T400s it yields:

BenchmarkAppendEmpty    50000000         5.0 ns/op
BenchmarkAppendPrealloc 50000000         3.5 ns/op
BenchmarkCopy           20000000        10.2 ns/op

This is actual version of benchmark provided by @cd1 (Go 1.8, linux x86_64) with the fixes of bugs mentioned by @icza and @PickBoy.

Bytes.Buffer is only 7 times faster than direct string concatenation via + operator.

package performance_test

import (
    "bytes"
    "fmt"
    "testing"
)

const (
    concatSteps = 100
)

func BenchmarkConcat(b *testing.B) {
    for n := 0; n < b.N; n++ {
        var str string
        for i := 0; i < concatSteps; i++ {
            str += "x"
        }
    }
}

func BenchmarkBuffer(b *testing.B) {
    for n := 0; n < b.N; n++ {
        var buffer bytes.Buffer
        for i := 0; i < concatSteps; i++ {
            buffer.WriteString("x")
        }
    }
}

Timings:

BenchmarkConcat-4                             300000          6869 ns/op
BenchmarkBuffer-4                            1000000          1186 ns/op
  • I don't think manually setting b.N is the right way to use benchmark functions of testing package – PickBoy Apr 26 '17 at 8:55
  • @PickBoy, please justify your point of view. Why do you think b.N is a public variable? – Vitaly Isaev Apr 26 '17 at 12:45
  • b.N is not supposed to be set in benchmark function. It's set by the go test tool dynamically. A benchmark function should run the same test b.N times, but in your code(as well as @cd1 's code), every test in the loop is a different test (because the length of the string is growing) – PickBoy Apr 27 '17 at 10:02
  • @PickBoy, if you let the go test tool set b.N dynamically, you'll wind up with a strings of a different length in different test-cases. See comment – Vitaly Isaev Apr 27 '17 at 10:39
  • That's why you should add an inner loop of a fixed number of iterations, like 10000, inside the b.N loop. – PickBoy Apr 27 '17 at 11:15

For those who come from the Java world where we have StringBuilder for efficient string concatenation, it seems like the latest go version has its equivalent and it's called Builder: https://github.com/golang/go/blob/master/src/strings/builder.go

I do it using the following :-

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "strings"
)

func main (){
    concatenation:= strings.Join([]string{"a","b","c"},"") //where second parameter is a separator. 
    fmt.Println(concatenation) //abc
}
package main

import (
"fmt"
)

func main() {
    var str1 = "string1"
    var str2 = "string2"
    result := make([]byte, 0)
    result = append(result, []byte(str1)...)
    result = append(result, []byte(str2)...)
    result = append(result, []byte(str1)...)
    result = append(result, []byte(str2)...)

    fmt.Println(string(result))
}
  • Please do not post code only answers. Please give an explanation what this code does and why it is the solution. – Korashen Aug 9 at 9:57

benchmark result with memory allocation statistics. check benchmark code at github.

use strings.Builder to optimize performance.

go test -bench . -benchmem
goos: darwin
goarch: amd64
pkg: github.com/hechen0/goexp/exps
BenchmarkConcat-8                1000000             60213 ns/op          503992 B/op          1 allocs/op
BenchmarkBuffer-8               100000000               11.3 ns/op             2 B/op          0 allocs/op
BenchmarkCopy-8                 300000000                4.76 ns/op            0 B/op          0 allocs/op
BenchmarkStringBuilder-8        1000000000               4.14 ns/op            6 B/op          0 allocs/op
PASS
ok      github.com/hechen0/goexp/exps   70.071s

goutils.JoinBetween

 func JoinBetween(in []string, separator string, startIndex, endIndex int) string {
    if in == nil {
        return ""
    }

    noOfItems := endIndex - startIndex

    if noOfItems <= 0 {
        return EMPTY
    }

    var builder strings.Builder

    for i := startIndex; i < endIndex; i++ {
        if i > startIndex {
            builder.WriteString(separator)
        }
        builder.WriteString(in[i])
    }
    return builder.String()
}

Take a look at the golang's strconv library giving access to several AppendXX functions, enabling us to concatenate strings with strings and other data types.

s := fmt.Sprintf("%s%s", []byte(s1), []byte(s2))
  • 4
    This is solution very slow, because it uses reflection, it parses the format string, and it makes a copy of the data for the []byte(s1) conversion. Comparing it with other solutions posted, can you name a single advantage of your solution? – pts Dec 4 '13 at 22:34

strings.Join() from the "strings" package

If you have a type mismatch(like if you are trying to join an int and a string), you do RANDOMTYPE (thing you want to change)

EX:

package main

import "strings"

var intEX = 0
var stringEX = "hello all you "
var stringEX2 = " people in here"

func main() {
    strings.Join(stringEX, string(intEX), stringEX2)
}
  • 3
    This code doesn't even compile: strings.Join() takes only 2 parameters: a slice and a separator string. – icza Aug 29 '16 at 9:24

protected by icza Aug 29 '16 at 9:39

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