9

I have table with invoice numbers. Guidelines say that numbers should have 6 or more digits. First of all tried to do:

UPDATE t1 SET NUMER=CONCAT('00000',NUMER) WHERE LENGTH(NUMER)=1;   
UPDATE t1 SET NUMER=CONCAT('0000',NUMER) WHERE LENGTH(NUMER)=2;  
UPDATE t1 SET NUMER=CONCAT('000',NUMER) WHERE LENGTH(NUMER)=3;  
UPDATE t1 SET NUMER=CONCAT('00',NUMER) WHERE LENGTH(NUMER)=4;  
UPDATE t1 SET NUMER=CONCAT('0',NUMER) WHERE LENGTH(NUMER)=5;  

but that isn't efficient, and even pretty. I tried LPAD function, but then came problem because function :

UPDATE t1 SET NUMER=LPAD(NUMER,6,'0') WHERE CHAR_LENGTH(NUMER)<=6 ;

returns ZERO rows affected. Also googled and they say that putting zero into quotes will solve problem, but didn't, any help ? It's daily import.

EDIT: Column NUMER is INT(19) and contain already data like :

NUMER
----------
1203  
12303 
123403 
1234503 
...

(it's filled with data with different length from 3 to 7 digits by now)

  • 2
    What data type does your NUMER column have? And doesn’t using the ZEROFILL attribute on a numeric value not solve your problem already? dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.5/en/numeric-type-attributes.html – CBroe Jul 12 '13 at 10:36
  • You can't update INT column to contain variable number of leading/trailing zeroes. Also, INT(19) is pointless. That isn't an integer with 19 digits. It's a 4 byte integer (2 to the power of 32), with display length of 19. Display length does what it says - it's how many digits it'll display, therefore it does nothing with the real length of the number in digits. Long story short - start off with a 6 digit invoice and keep incrementing the number. – N.B. Jul 12 '13 at 10:49
  • @CBroe, no, ZEROFIL is not good, because i have historical data eg. 1203 changed into 001203, and i have 7 digit numbers. So i will have change all history after each one number of digits extension – jaczes Jul 12 '13 at 10:49
  • @N.B., its import from other program, that i cant't trust if they will provide same today as tomorow. – jaczes Jul 12 '13 at 10:53
30

I think you should consider that the guidelines you read apply to how an invoice should be displayed, and not how it should be stored in the database.

When a number is stored as an INT, it's a pure number. If you add zeros in front and store it again, it is still the same number.

You could select the NUMER field as follows, or create a view for that table:

SELECT LPAD(NUMER,6,'0') AS NUMER
FROM ...

Or, rather than changing the data when you select it from the database, consider padding the number with zeros when you display it, and only when you display it.

I think your requirement for historical data to stay the same is a moot point. Even for historical data, an invoice numbered 001203 is the same as an invoice numbered 1203.

However, if you absolutely must do it the way you describe, then converting to a VARCHAR field may work. Converted historical data can be stored as-is, and any new entries could be padded to the required number of zeros. But I do not recommend that.

  • Thank you. It helped a lot. – moreirapontocom Apr 15 at 18:12
  • 'LPAD(112, 5, 0)'. This is not working. Have any idea? – Dhaduk Mitesh Oct 7 at 6:06
  • @DhadukMitesh I suggest asking a new SO question. – Gustav Bertram Oct 8 at 11:48
3

UPDATE t1 SET NUMER=LPAD(NUMER,6,'0') WHERE CHAR_LENGTH(NUMER)<=6 ; will not do what you expect since the NUMER field is an int. It will create the string '001234' from the int 1234 and then cast it back into 1234 - that is why there is no change.

Change NUMER to type int(6) zerofill and MySQL will pad it for you each time you read it.

If you really want zeros stored in the database, you have to change the type to CHAR/VARCHAR, then your LPAD update statement will work.

0

The field in the table is an int column so it just stores a number. There's no way to pad out the data in the table. 1 == 001 == 000000000001. This is the same number.

You should do the padding at the application level (the system that pulls the data out of the table). What happens when the order number goes above 999999? You would then have to update all the data in the table to add an extra 0. This kind of thing should not be done at the database level.

You could also select the data out with an LPAD:

SELECT LPAD(NUMER,6,'0'), [other_columns] FROM t1;

Alternative, As CBroe mentioned you could change the datatype to be INT(6) ZEROFILL so that it displays correctly but this will have to be modified if it goes above 999999 as mentioned above..

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