60

I'm investigating Microsoft enterprise library (data application block) -- The samples sln.

They have a sample of reading data asynchronously ( IAsync , although the new ver (6) also support async).

But Resharper(or visual studio- nevermind) shows me : "Access to disposed closure" : (first i will show the image , so it will be clearer , then i'll paste the code )

enter image description here

code :

/*1*/    [Description("Execute a command that retrieves data asynchronously")]
/*2*/    static void ReadDataAsynchronously()
/*3*/    {
/*4*/        if (!SupportsAsync(asyncDB)) return;
/*5*/   
/*6*/        using(var doneWaitingEvent = new ManualResetEvent(false))
/*7*/        using(var readCompleteEvent = new ManualResetEvent(false))
/*8*/        {
/*9*/            try
/*10*/            {
/*11*/                // Create command to execute stored procedure and add parameters
/*12*/                DbCommand cmd = asyncDB.GetStoredProcCommand("ListOrdersSlowly");
/*13*/                asyncDB.AddInParameter(cmd, "state", DbType.String, "Colorado");
/*14*/                asyncDB.AddInParameter(cmd, "status", DbType.String, "DRAFT");
/*15*/                // Execute the query asynchronously specifying the command and the
/*16*/                // expression to execute when the data access process completes.
/*17*/                asyncDB.BeginExecuteReader(cmd,
/*18*/                    asyncResult = >
/*19*/                    {
/*20*/                        // Lambda expression executed when the data access completes.
/*21*/                        doneWaitingEvent.Set();
/*22*/                        try
/*23*/                        {
/*24*/                            using(IDataReader reader = asyncDB.EndExecuteReader(asyncResult))
/*25*/                            {
/*26*/                                Console.WriteLine();
/*27*/                                Console.WriteLine();
/*28*/                                DisplayRowValues(reader);
/*29*/                            }
/*30*/                        }
/*31*/                        catch (Exception ex)
/*32*/                        {
/*33*/                            Console.WriteLine("Error after data access completed: {0}", ex.Message);
/*34*/                        }
/*35*/                        finally
/*36*/                        {
/*37*/                            readCompleteEvent.Set();
/*38*/                        }
/*39*/                    }, null);
/*40*/   
/*41*/                // Display waiting messages to indicate executing asynchronouly
/*42*/                while (!doneWaitingEvent.WaitOne(1000))
/*43*/                {
/*44*/                    Console.Write("Waiting... ");
/*45*/                }
/*46*/   
/*47*/                // Allow async thread to write results before displaying "continue" prompt
/*48*/                readCompleteEvent.WaitOne();
/*49*/            }
/*50*/            catch (Exception ex)
/*51*/            {
/*52*/                Console.WriteLine("Error while starting data access: {0}", ex.Message);
/*53*/            }
/*54*/        }
/*55*/    }

Question :

Why is it giving this warning ? there is a manualreset-checked-signal (which runs in a loop) which prevents the using clause to be reached - which means - no dispose will call .

So why does it yell (warning) ?

  • 1
    Aside: Why are you using async calls when you're waiting for the result? Seems like using Tasks would be more straightforward here. – millimoose Jul 12 '13 at 17:17
  • SAMPLES SLN. this SLN contains 15 more examples which also uses TASK( async). that's not my question though. – Royi Namir Jul 12 '13 at 17:18
  • I'm curious - are there simpler variants of this situation that R# is smart enough to recognize as "safe"? I would be surprised if so. – default.kramer Jul 12 '13 at 17:18
  • My guess is simply that R# isn't perfect. It can't know (i.e. its static analysis isn't advanced enough to know about how the event interacts with an async call) that the lambda is never called after the using goes out of scope, so it warns you this might happen. – millimoose Jul 12 '13 at 17:19
  • 3
    @RoyiNamir The sample might well be correct. It probably is. R# is trying to prevent you event.Set() being called after the using block finishes. With async calls or any use of that object in a lambda, this is theorethically possible. The warning doesn't mean "this is a bug", but "this might be a bug and you should take a look at this code more closely" – millimoose Jul 12 '13 at 17:23
67

You pass doneWaitingEvent to a lambda that may extend beyond the scope of the using block. I.e. there's a risk that Dispose will have been called when the lambda executes.

56

It yells warning because the engine is not smart enough to figure out that the using block will never be exited before the delegate code completes. That is why this is a warning not a error.

You can safely ignore this warning, you can have resharper suppress the warning by wrapping the lines with special comments

asyncDB.BeginExecuteReader(cmd, asyncResult =>
{
    // Lambda expression executed when the data access completes.
    // ReSharper disable AccessToDisposedClosure
    doneWaitingEvent.Set();
    // ReSharper restore AccessToDisposedClosure
    try
    {
        using (IDataReader reader = asyncDB.EndExecuteReader(asyncResult))
        {
            Console.WriteLine();
            Console.WriteLine();
            DisplayRowValues(reader);
        }
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Error after data access completed: {0}", ex.Message);
    }
    finally
    {
        // ReSharper disable AccessToDisposedClosure
        readCompleteEvent.Set();
        // ReSharper restore AccessToDisposedClosure
    }
}, null);
  • 2
    Or if you control the function being called you can use JetBrains' [InstantHandle] annotation to mark it safe for all the different invocations. See this question – jtb Jan 26 '17 at 0:51
  • @jtb That is new to resharper in one of the more recent releases I believe. Feel free to post an answer with the annotation. I would upvote it – Scott Chamberlain Jan 26 '17 at 0:53
  • You may also use "ReSharper disable once AccessToDisposedClosure" to avoid the second comment – Joshua Krstic Jun 24 at 22:01
5

The reason you see ReSharper's warnings is that ReSharper's code flow analysis engine is not strong enough to see what is going on: they assume that your code could get to the end of the using clause without doneWaitingEvent being set, which is not possible due to a while loop:

while (!doneWaitingEvent.WaitOne(1000)) {
    Console.Write("Waiting... ");
}

The loop will keep printing the "Waiting... " line until doneWaitingEvent.Set(); gets called, preventing your code from reaching the end of the using block. Same goes for the other warning.

Long story short, this warning can be safely ignored. Add ReSharper's "ignore this warning" comments, and optionally file a bug report with them.

  • 4
    To future readers, on the "Optionally file a bug report with them", don't dismiss this idea thinking "Oh they are a big company and won't listen to me". I had a similar "not necessary warning" suggesting I should use a different overload of CreateLinkedCancelationTokenSource, I reported it and they fixed it right away. – Scott Chamberlain Nov 14 '14 at 17:09
  • 1
    @ScottChamberlain I'd say it depends... I've created two very serious bugs a long time ago and they still have not fixed them. First, and second. – julealgon Apr 13 '15 at 13:19
  • Looks like they fixed the second, and the first is assigned (to the same person who fixed the second). They aren't just ignoring them :) – defines Mar 24 '16 at 18:36
  • @ScottChamberlain. I too filled a bug and Resharper team fixed it in less than 2 weeks. – Lior Nov 22 '18 at 8:42

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