9

I have an array of size 1000. How can I find the indices (indexes) of the five maximum elements?

An example with setup code and my attempt are displayed below:

Random rand = new Random();
int[] myArray = new int[1000];
int[] maxIndices = new int[5];
int[] maxValues = new int[5];

for (int i = 0; i < myArray.length; i++) {
  myArray[i] = rand.nextInt();
}

for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++) {
  maxIndices[i] = i;
  maxValues[i] = myArray[i];
}

for (int i = 0; i < maxIndices.length; i++) {
  for (int j = 0; j < myArray.length; j++) {
    if (myArray[j] > maxValues[i]) {
      maxIndices[i] = j;
      maxValues[i] = myArray[j];
    }
  }
}

for (int i = 0; i < maxIndices.length; i++) {
  System.out.println("Index: " + maxIndices[i]);
}

I know the problem is that it is constantly assigning the highest maximum value to all the maximum elements. I am unsure how to remedy this because I have to preserve the values and the indices of myArray.

I don't think sorting is an option because I need to preserve the indices. In fact, it is the indices that I need specifically.

5
  • It looks like you need to reconsider how to update when you find a new element in the top 5. Commented Jul 12, 2013 at 20:27
  • there are some index-preserving approaches in this discussion Commented Jul 12, 2013 at 20:29
  • (To be clear, your approach is already pretty close to right; you just need to rework that third loop.) Commented Jul 12, 2013 at 20:40
  • can you use arraylists? that might lead to an easier algorithm
    – mistahenry
    Commented Jul 12, 2013 at 20:42
  • Start by getting the index of the first maximum. Commented Jul 12, 2013 at 20:52

8 Answers 8

7

Sorry to answer this old question but I am missing an implementation which has all following properties:

  • Easy to read
  • Performant
  • Handling of multiple same values

Therefore I implemented it:

    private int[] getBestKIndices(float[] array, int num) {
        //create sort able array with index and value pair
        IndexValuePair[] pairs = new IndexValuePair[array.length];
        for (int i = 0; i < array.length; i++) {
            pairs[i] = new IndexValuePair(i, array[i]);
        }

        //sort
        Arrays.sort(pairs, new Comparator<IndexValuePair>() {
            public int compare(IndexValuePair o1, IndexValuePair o2) {
                return Float.compare(o2.value, o1.value);
            }
        });

        //extract the indices
        int[] result = new int[num];
        for (int i = 0; i < num; i++) {
            result[i] = pairs[i].index;
        }
        return result;
    }

    private class IndexValuePair {
        private int index;
        private float value;

        public IndexValuePair(int index, float value) {
            this.index = index;
            this.value = value;
        }
    }
6

Sorting is an option, at the expense of extra memory. Consider the following algorithm.

1. Allocate additional array and copy into - O(n)
2. Sort additional array - O(n lg n)
3. Lop off the top k elements (in this case 5) - O(n), since k could be up to n
4. Iterate over the original array - O(n)
    4.a search the top k elements for to see if they contain the current element - O(lg n)

So it step 4 is (n * lg n), just like the sort. The entire algorithm is n lg n, and is very simple to code.

Here's a quick and dirty example. There may be bugs in it, and obviously null checking and the like come into play.

import java.util.Arrays;

class ArrayTest {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        int[] arr = {1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10};
        int[] indexes = indexesOfTopElements(arr,3);
        for(int i = 0; i < indexes.length; i++) {
            int index = indexes[i];
            System.out.println(index + " " + arr[index]);
        }
    }

    static int[] indexesOfTopElements(int[] orig, int nummax) {
        int[] copy = Arrays.copyOf(orig,orig.length);
        Arrays.sort(copy);
        int[] honey = Arrays.copyOfRange(copy,copy.length - nummax, copy.length);
        int[] result = new int[nummax];
        int resultPos = 0;
        for(int i = 0; i < orig.length; i++) {
            int onTrial = orig[i];
            int index = Arrays.binarySearch(honey,onTrial);
            if(index < 0) continue;
            result[resultPos++] = i;
        }
        return result;
    }

}

There are other things you can do to reduce the overhead of this operation. For example instead of sorting, you could opt to use a queue that just tracks the largest 5. Being ints they values would probably have to be boxed to be added to a collection (unless you rolled your own) which adds to overhead significantly.

2
  • @TheNewIdiot - the correct usage is lg not log. And 4.a is not the same as 5, because it's not a different step - it's what happens during the iteration.
    – corsiKa
    Commented Jul 12, 2013 at 20:33
  • @Hunter Kind of. lg means log base 2. When in big O notation, they do condense to one another because they are on the same order, that's correct. However, if that change had been reviewed it would have been rejected as "too minor", and the changing of 4.a to 5 would be rejected as "incorrect".
    – corsiKa
    Commented Jul 12, 2013 at 20:43
3

a bit late in answering, you could also use this function that I wrote:

/**
  * Return the indexes correspond to the top-k largest in an array.
  */
public static int[] maxKIndex(double[] array, int top_k) {
    double[] max = new double[top_k];
    int[] maxIndex = new int[top_k];
    Arrays.fill(max, Double.NEGATIVE_INFINITY);
    Arrays.fill(maxIndex, -1);

    top: for(int i = 0; i < array.length; i++) {
        for(int j = 0; j < top_k; j++) {
            if(array[i] > max[j]) {
                for(int x = top_k - 1; x > j; x--) {
                    maxIndex[x] = maxIndex[x-1]; max[x] = max[x-1];
                }
                maxIndex[j] = i; max[j] = array[i];
                continue top;
            }
        }
    }
    return maxIndex;
}
1
1

Easy O(nlogn) heap solution:

    public static List<Integer> getTopKIndices(List<Double> scores, int k) {
        Comparator<Map.Entry<Integer, Double>> comparator = Map.Entry.comparingByValue();
        PriorityQueue<Map.Entry<Integer, Double>> heap = new PriorityQueue<>(scores.size(), comparator.reversed());

        for (int i = 0; i < scores.size(); i++)
            heap.add(new AbstractMap.SimpleEntry<>(i, scores.get(i)));
        
        List<Integer> topKIndices = new LinkedList<>();
        for (int i = 0; i < k && !heap.isEmpty(); i++)
            topKIndices.add(heap.poll().getKey());

        return topKIndices;
    }
0

My quick and a bit "think outside the box" idea would be to use the EvictingQueue that holds an maximum of 5 elements. You'd had to pre-fill it with the first five elements from your array (do it in a ascending order, so the first element you add is the lowest from the five).

Than you have to iterate through the array and add a new element to the queue whenever the current value is greater than the lowest value in the queue. To remember the indexes, create a wrapper object (a value/index pair).

After iterating through the whole array, you have your five maximum value/index pairs in the queue (in descending order).

It's a O(n) solution.

1
  • it's similar that my answer xD
    – nachokk
    Commented Jul 12, 2013 at 20:59
0

Arrays.sort(myArray), then take the final 5 elements.

Sort a copy if you want to preserve the original order.

If you want the indices, there isn't a quick-and-dirty solution as there would be in python or some other languages. You sort and scan, but that's ugly.

Or you could go objecty - this is java, after all. Make an ArrayMaxFilter object. It'll have a private class ArrayElement, which consists of an index and a value and has a natural ordering by value. It'll have a method which takes a pair of ints, index and value, creates an ArrayElement of them, and drops them into a priority queue of length 5. (or however many you want to find). Submit each index/value pair from the array, then report out the values remaining in the queue. (yes, a priority queue traditionally keeps the lowest values, but you can flip this in your implementation)

1
  • 1
    OP wants to preserve the indexes in the original array.
    – corsiKa
    Commented Jul 12, 2013 at 20:34
0

Here is my solution. Create a class that pairs an indice with a value:

public class IndiceValuePair{
    private int indice;
    private int value;

    public IndiceValuePair(int ind, int val){
        indice = ind;
        value = val;
    }
    public int getIndice(){
        return indice;
    }
    public int getValue(){
        return value;
    }
}

and then use this class in your main method:

public static void main(String[] args){
    Random rand = new Random();
    int[] myArray = new int[10];
    IndiceValuePair[] pairs = new IndiceValuePair[5];
    System.out.println("Here are the indices and their values:");
    for(int i = 0; i < myArray.length; i++) {
        myArray[i] = rand.nextInt(100);
        System.out.println(i+ ": " + myArray[i]);
        for(int j = 0; j < pairs.length; j++){
            //for the first five entries
            if(pairs[j] == null){
                pairs[j] = new IndiceValuePair(i, myArray[i]);
                break;
            }
            else if(pairs[j].getValue() < myArray[i]){
                //inserts the new pair into its correct spot
                for(int k = 4; k > j; k--){
                    pairs[k] = pairs [k-1];
                }
                pairs[j] = new IndiceValuePair(i, myArray[i]);
                break;
            }
        }
    }
    System.out.println("\n5 Max indices and their values");
    for(int i = 0; i < pairs.length; i++){
        System.out.println(pairs[i].getIndice() + ": " + pairs[i].getValue());
    }
}

and example output from a run:

Here are the indices and their values:
0: 13
1: 71
2: 45
3: 38
4: 43
5: 9
6: 4
7: 5
8: 59
9: 60

5 Max indices and their values
1: 71
9: 60
8: 59
2: 45
4: 43

The example I provided only generates ten ints with a value between 0 and 99 just so that I could see that it worked. You can easily change this to fit 1000 values of any size. Also, rather than run 3 separate for loops, I checked to see if the newest value I add is a max value right after I add to to myArray. Give it a run and see if it works for you

0

I would suggest to use a PriorityQueue, which is a minmax head and has a complexity of O(n log k):

private int[] getTopKIndices(double[] array, int num) {
PriorityQueue<IndexValuePair> queue = new PriorityQueue<>(Comparator.comparingDouble((IndexValuePair value) -> value.value));

for (int i = 0; i < array.length; i++) {
    queue.offer(new IndexValuePair(i, array[i]));
    if (queue.size() > num) {
        queue.poll();
    }
}

int[] result = new int[num];
for (int i = 0; i < num; i++) {
    result[num - 1 - i] = queue.poll().index;
}

return result;

}

You could also use Google Guava for that (also n log k):

import com.google.common.collect.Ordering;    
private static int[] getTopKIndices(double[] array, int num) {
        List<IndexValuePair> pairs = new ArrayList<>();
        for (int i = 0; i < array.length; i++) {
            pairs.add(new IndexValuePair(i, array[i]));
        }

        Comparator<IndexValuePair> valueComparator = Comparator.comparingDouble(value -> value.value);
        List<IndexValuePair> topKPairs = Ordering.from(valueComparator).greatestOf(pairs, num);

        int[] result = new int[num];
        for (int i = 0; i < num; i++) {
            result[i] = topKPairs.get(i).index;
        }

Simply comparing these implementaion in Java with Top 10 for 5 Mio entries gives you:

45411 ms for the solution with simple sorting
1815 ms for the priority queue
2086 ms for the guava solution

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