6

Does PowerShell call any initialization code when a module is loaded?

I am looking for something like a Perl BEGIN block, or a constructor.

Both NEW-MODULE and IMPORT-MODULE will return a PSCustomObject. I am trying to encapsulate a custom object in a module to avoid lengthy code in scripts. One method that tests well in open code is:

$m = new-module -scriptblock {
New-Object PSCustomObject | 
    Add-Member NoteProperty -name person -value Frodo -passthru | 
    Add-Member ScriptMethod Who { $this.person }  -passthru |
    Add-Member ScriptMethod Mod { 
        param($x)
        $this.person = $x
        } -passthru
} -ascustomobject -returnresult

Ideally I would like to drop this code into a module and use something like:

$MyObj = Import-Module -Name ".\MyPackage" -AsCustomObject

and have MyObj be a handle to an object the same as the first snippet provides.

Suggestions appreciated.

3 Answers 3

6

It's not clear if you want to run initialization code when a module is loaded (like Perl's BEGIN block) or if you want to create a custom class (which is what "constructor" suggests).

Initialization code in a module is easy. Any code in a module not embedded in a function is executed when the module is imported.

Creating a custom class isn't supported natively in PS. But see: http://psclass.codeplex.com/. You can also write C#, VBScript, etc. and use Add-Type.

Import-module won't work to simulate a class, because you can only have 1 instance of a module with a given name - at best you'd have a singleton class. (BTW, import-module does have a -passthru parameter, which would more or less make your last line of code work - as a singleton. You'd also have to add export-module -variable * -function * to your module code) You could use New-Module to simulate a class though. And you could wrap it in a function named, new-myClass for example.

BTW, if you use the -ASCustomObject parameter you end up with a hashtable, which doesn't support "this" (in words hash table values that are script blocks don't have a built-in way to refer to the hashtable itself). If you use new-module without -AsCustomObject (and potentially use a factory function, for example new-myclass) then you could simulate "this.varInMyModule" with & $myModule $varInMyModule. However if you create a PSCustomObject, using Add-Member, then script method have access to $this and it in general acts a lot more like a typical object with properties and methods.

1
  • Do you have a link to documentation confirming "Any code in a module not embedded in a function is executed when the module is imported." I believe this is a half truth: modules written in PowerShell work this way, modules written in C# do not seem to have a way to do this (unless you edit CIL and add .ModuleInit, such as with Fody post-build handler, because ModuleInit is not common language specification compliant). Jun 19, 2019 at 12:24
2

Modules are really supposed to output cmdlets, not objects. A module should provide a set of related cmdlets. There is a way to send data into the module using Import-Modules's -ArgumentList parameter as show here. You could use the technique to provide a server name for your cmdlets to connect to for example. The PowerCLI module handles that differently using a cmdlet that creates a script scope connection object ($script:connection) that the other cmdlets check for and re-use if it exists similar to this:

#test.psm1
$script:myvar = "hi"
function Show-MyVar {Write-Host $script:myvar}
function Set-MyVar ($Value) {$script:myvar = $Value}
#end test.psm1
0
0

Using Modules you can export both innate properties and functions, and don't need to run them through add-member or do much acrobatics. Note however that it has some issues if you don't want to export all properties and methods, and while you can initialize properties to an initial value, you CAN'T call an internal function during initialization without doing some akward acrobatics.

But I think what you really want to do is use Classes which are now available in Powershell 5 (they weren't when you posted). I've provided examples of each. Sysops has a decent tutorial on the new classes in 4 parts

Here's the older way before powershell 5.0

# powershell 3.0 and above (I think)
$m = new-module -ascustomobject -scriptblock `
    {
    $person = "Frodo"
    function Who
        ()
        {return $this.person}
    function Rename
        ($name)
        {$this.person = $name}
    Export-ModuleMember -Function * -Variable *
    }

write-host "direct property access: $($m.person)"
write-host "method call: $($m.who())"
$m.Rename("Shelob")
write-host "change test: $($m.who())"

Also you can replicate multiple objects from a template like this:

# powershell 3.0 and above (I think)
$template = `
    {
    $person = "Frodo"
    function Who
        ()
        {return $this.person}
    function Rename
        ($name)
        {$this.person = $name}
    Export-ModuleMember -Function * -Variable *
    }

$me = new-module -ascustomobject -scriptblock $template; $me.Rename("Shelob")
$you = new-module -ascustomobject -scriptblock $template

"Me: $($me.Who())"
"You: $($you.Who())"

And in powershell 5 you have actual classes (mostly)

#requires -version 5
Class Person
    {
    hidden [String] $name #not actually private

    [string] Who ()
        {return $this.name}

    [void] Rename ([string] $name)
        {$this.name = $name}

    # constructors are weird though, you don't specify return type OR explicitly return value.
    Person ([String]$name)
        {$this.name = $name}
    <#
    # The above constructor code is secretly converted to this
    [Person] New ([string]$name) #note the added return type and renamed to New
        {
        $this.name = $name
        return $this #note that we are returning ourself, you can exploit this to create chained constructors like [person]::New("gandalf").withWizardLevel("White") but I haven't done so here
        }
    #>

    }
$me = [Person]::new("Shelob")
$you = [Person]::new("Frodo")

# $me|gm        # Note that Name doesn't show here
# $me.name      # But we can still access it...
# $me|gm -Force # Note that Name DOES show here

"`n"
"Me: $($me.who())"
"You: $($you.who())"
$you.Rename("Dinner")
"You after we meet: $($you.who())"

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