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Hope this is not something obvious, just want to clarify some things I am not totally sure about. I got this question while watching a tutorial on how to implement caching. There is seems that just adding some global caching variables on the server, will implement caching for all clients. I use PHP with Apache webserver.

I know that a web-server can accept multiple client HTTP requests. My question is what happens on the web server code.

Is the same server code executed each time? Meaning that some global variables are preserved? Or for each new HTTP request, a new instance of the code is created. If yes, are those multiple instances connected or can be made aware of each other in any way?

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Bad news is the apache server does not native support for that kind of work. You have to use some intermediate stuff like database to handle this. However, good news is node.js do that stuff easily in an elegance way :D

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well changing apache is not an option now. my question is how apache works in this aspect. –  Aris Jul 13 '13 at 8:32
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apache just receive the http requests, create new sessions and run your code in each session. So one session does not know about others even global variables. –  Rikky Jul 13 '13 at 8:40
    
the example i watched was in python. does the language differ from php in this aspect, or maybe they use some different web-server? –  Aris Jul 13 '13 at 16:33
    
I haven't worked with python yet. But back to your post, are you thinking of something like native caching in php? If true, you have a wrong approach. It's not the way PHP work, you MUST use some other outer memory like memcached, database, files... But as I said before, Node.js is another server-side script, and it run slightly different from PHP, it handles ALL the requests at a single process, so the native caching is possible and I guess python works like Node.js –  Rikky Jul 13 '13 at 18:08

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