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I have a long string, "the silver rider on his back and the palm tree". I would like to write a Ruby method that capitalizes all words except "on", "the", and "and" in the middle of the sentence, but have the "the" capitalized at the beginning?

Here is what I have so far:

def title(word)
  small_words = %w[on the and]
  word.split(' ').map  do |w|
    unless small_words.include?(w)
      w.capitalize
    else
      w
    end
  end.join(' ')
end

This code actually does most of what I need but don't know how to include or exclude for that matter the "the" at the beginning of the sentence.

3
0

This will capitalize all the words, except for the stop words (your small words) that aren't the first in the sentence.

def title(sentence)
  stop_words = %w{a an and the or for of nor} #there is no such thing as a definite list of stop words, so you may edit it according to your needs.
  sentence.split.each_with_index.map{|word, index| stop_words.include?(word) && index > 0 ? word : word.capitalize }.join(" ")
end
| improve this answer | |
  • Awesome Cezar! That's just what I was looking for. I just couldn't see 'each_with_index' being very useful indeed. – Nicholas Alek Jul 13 '13 at 23:36
  • Glad to have helped. Please consider accepting/upvoting the answer if it solved the problem. Also, you should do the same for answers to other questions you've asked on Stack Overflow. This is useful to reward people who answer questions correctly, while at the same time allows other users to benefit from questions you've asked by easily identifying good answers. – Cezar Jul 13 '13 at 23:39
  • How do I accept your answer? Where in the stackoverflow? Not using it much. – Nicholas Alek Jul 13 '13 at 23:43
  • In order to accept the answer, click the white checkmark next to it. To upvote it, click the up arrow above the zero. Also refer to this page stackoverflow.com/about It will teach you how to use Stack Overflow in a more beneffitial way both to you and the community as a whole. – Cezar Jul 13 '13 at 23:45
  • 1
    Got it:) Thanks for reminding me of others who participated as well and the old posts I haven't gotten through to vote either. Again, much appreciated. – Nicholas Alek Jul 13 '13 at 23:46
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It’s easiest to just forget about the special case of the first letter initially and then handle it after doing everything else:

def title(sentence)
  small_words = %w[on the and]

  capitalized_words = sentence.split(' ').map do |word|
    small_words.include?(word) ? word : word.capitalize
  end
  capitalized_words.first.capitalize!

  capitalized_words.join(' ')
end

This also capitalizes any “small word” at the beginning, not just “the”—but I think that’s probably what you want anyway.

| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks for helping, Andrew. Your code only works for a first letter in the sentence, everything else is lower case though. What I need is something like this; "The Silver Rider on His Back and the Palm Tree" and not "The silver rider on his back and the palm tree". – Nicholas Alek Jul 13 '13 at 23:32
  • capitalize => Modifies str by converting the first character to uppercase and the remainder to lowercase. Your function has the same effect of just calling capitalize on the input string. – Cezar Jul 13 '13 at 23:36
  • I am amazed how quickly you guys jumped to help. Thank you all! – Nicholas Alek Jul 13 '13 at 23:40
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    @Cezar Right you are. Forgot that capitalize was a core method and assumed the OP had their own implementation, hence why I previously noted my assumption about what capitalize did. – Andrew Marshall Jul 14 '13 at 0:05
0
0

A simple mod to your existing code would make it work:

def title( word )
  small_words = %w[on the and]
  word.split(' ').map.with_index do |w, i|
    unless (small_words.include? w) and (i > 0)
      w.capitalize
    else
      w
    end
  end.join(' ')
end
| improve this answer | |
  • @NicholasAlek It's essentially the same solution that Cezar posted later. His is just written more compactly. – lurker Jul 13 '13 at 23:51
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SmallWords = %w[on the and]
def title word
  word.gsub(/[\w']+/){
    SmallWords.include?($&) && $~.begin(0).zero?.! ? $& : $&.capitalize
  }
end
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Why (...).! instead of !(...)? – Andrew Marshall Jul 14 '13 at 0:24
  • Why !(...) instead of (...).!? – sawa Jul 14 '13 at 0:30
  • By "idiomatic", you mean more people use it? I don't care about that. I care about consistency. All other methods are chained: We start with the receiver $~, then begin applies, then zero? applies, then ! applies. I don't see any reason to suddenly switch to use the prefix notation for the method !. – sawa Jul 14 '13 at 0:43
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    First, the ! in !(...) is not a method, it’s an operator, so the consistency argument goes right out the window there. And would you really do 2.+(2).- instead of -(2 + 2)? – Andrew Marshall Jul 14 '13 at 1:06
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    If you care about consistency, then you should consider the consistency of idiomatic use. Don't use camel-case constants like SmallWords. Use "SCREAMING_SNAKE_CASE" per github.com/bbatsov/ruby-style-guide and github.com/styleguide/ruby. – the Tin Man Jul 14 '13 at 2:55

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