I have a project which requires printing an HTML table with many rows.

My problem is the way the table is printed over multiple page. It will sometimes cut a row in half, making it unreadable because one half is on the bleeding edge of a page and the remainder is printed on the top of the next page.

The only plausible solution I can think of is using stacked DIVs instead of a table and force page-breaks if needed.. but before going through the whole change I thought I could ask here before.

  • 23
    On a tangent, it might be worth adding a <thead> to your table with the following css thead {display: table-header-group; } so as to print the table-header on all subsequent pages (useful for loooooong data tables). – David Thomas Nov 19 '09 at 14:38

11 Answers 11

up vote 247 down vote accepted
<!DOCTYPE HTML>
<html>
<head>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8">
<title>Test</title>
<style type="text/css">
    table { page-break-inside:auto }
    tr    { page-break-inside:avoid; page-break-after:auto }
    thead { display:table-header-group }
    tfoot { display:table-footer-group }
</style>
</head>
<body>
    <table>
        <thead>
            <tr><th>heading</th></tr>
        </thead>
        <tfoot>
            <tr><td>notes</td></tr>
        </tfoot>
        <tbody>
        <tr>
            <td>x</td>
        </tr>
        <tr>
            <td>x</td>
        </tr>
        <!-- 500 more rows -->
        <tr>
            <td>x</td>
        </tr>
    </tbody>
    </table>
</body>
</html>
  • 15
    This also fails in WebKit browsers (eg. Safari and Chrome) – Michael Haren Mar 14 '12 at 19:51
  • 5
    While this is the standards-compliant way to do this, the only browser that currently implements the standard is Opera. Note that this is part of css2, and so the lack of implementation is likely to be a problem for some time to come, because apparently no-one cares. – pkh May 8 '12 at 19:16
  • 15
    The CSS 2.1 specification indicates that page break style attributes are only applied to block-level elements. The default display mode for table rows is table-row. Unfortunately, no table elements are block level elements by default, including the table itself. – lsuarez Nov 30 '12 at 21:07
  • 2
    @SinanÜnür It's not a requirement, so you can't rely on it, and unfortunately from my testing I can see that webkit saw "may" and ignored anything beyond it. Strangely, IE's got some rather nice large table printing support. Never thought I'd sing its praises on any given point. – lsuarez Dec 2 '12 at 16:39
  • 6
    I can confirm that this does NOT work fine in Chrome or any other Webkit browser (e.g. Safari, Opera)-- unless, by "works fine" you mean "excludes any features that are considered optional". I think what most people want is running headers and footers, and tables that only allow page breaks between rows, neither of which is implemented in Webkit as of 2015/11/13. – DoctorDestructo Nov 13 '15 at 13:12

Note: when using the page-break-after:always for the tag it will create a page break after the last bit of the table, creating an entirely blank page at the end every time! To fix this just change it to page-break-after:auto. It will break correctly and not create an extra blank page.

<html>
<head>
<style>
@media print
{
  table { page-break-after:auto }
  tr    { page-break-inside:avoid; page-break-after:auto }
  td    { page-break-inside:avoid; page-break-after:auto }
  thead { display:table-header-group }
  tfoot { display:table-footer-group }
}
</style>
</head>

<body>
....
</body>
</html>
  • Works for me on Chrome and is a nice plain CSS solution. – Ryan Feb 14 '17 at 9:28
  • I'm trying same solution, but it does not break table data and disappear extra data instead of displaying it on next page. Any guesses? – Null Pointer Jul 9 at 14:06

Expanding from Sinan Ünür solution:

<!DOCTYPE HTML>
<html>
<head>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8">
<title>Test</title>
<style type="text/css">
    table { page-break-inside:auto }
    div   { page-break-inside:avoid; } /* This is the key */
    thead { display:table-header-group }
    tfoot { display:table-footer-group }
</style>
</head>
<body>
    <table>
        <thead>
            <tr><th>heading</th></tr>
        </thead>
        <tfoot>
            <tr><td>notes</td></tr>
        </tfoot>
        <tr>
            <td><div>Long<br />cell<br />should'nt<br />be<br />cut</div></td>
        </tr>
        <tr>
            <td><div>Long<br />cell<br />should'nt<br />be<br />cut</div></td>
        </tr>
        <!-- 500 more rows -->
        <tr>
            <td>x</td>
        </tr>
    </tbody>
    </table>
</body>
</html>

It seems that page-break-inside:avoid in some browsers is only taken in consideration for block elements, not for cell, table, row neither inline-block.

If you try to display:block the TR tag, and use there page-break-inside:avoid, it works, but messes around with your table layout.

  • 2
    Here's an easy way to add the divs dynamically with jquery: $(document).ready(function(){$("table tbody th, table tbody td").wrapInner("<div></div>");}); – Chris Bloom Sep 11 '14 at 5:26
  • 1
    Thanks to sinan ürün, vicenteherrera and Chrisbloom7. I applied the combination of your answers and it now works! – Nurhak Kaya Aug 3 '16 at 8:31

None of the answers here worked for me in Chrome. AAverin on GitHub has created some useful Javascript for this purpose and this worked for me:

Just add the js to your code and add the class 'splitForPrint' to your table and it will neatly split the table into multiple pages and add the table header to each page.

  • Do you have sample on how to apply this? I've been trying to assign my table className as splitForPrint but in the JS there's nowhere it took the reference of the element using the className splitForPrint. Only the part where var splitClassName = 'splitForPrint'; but that's it. – Compaq LE2202x Aug 20 '14 at 3:05
  • Down voted because the script you linked to does not solve the OP's problem without considerable cherry-picking and reconfiguring, and you didn't provide any examples of how one might go about doing it. – Chris Bloom Sep 12 '14 at 15:05
  • doesn't work on Chrome v39 on Mac – sirjay Dec 9 '14 at 8:44
  • Worked like a charm for me, none of the other solutions worked. +1 Had to add a little css to get the correct breaks .page-break { page-break-after: always; } – fhugas Feb 1 '16 at 17:33
  • Yep by adding .page-break { page-break-after: always; } it saved my day! – milodky May 9 '16 at 21:35

Use these CSS properties:

page-break-after

page-break-before 

For instance:

<html>
<head>
<style>
@media print
{
table {page-break-after:always}
}
</style>
</head>

<body>
....
</body>
</html>

via

  • 2
    It works on table rows ? – h3. Nov 19 '09 at 14:27
  • I'm not sure, you'll have to check. If not, split into different arrays and separate the arrays by an empty div – marcgg Nov 19 '09 at 14:27
  • (or on the "table" element) – marcgg Nov 19 '09 at 14:28
  • You will have to apply it to the table row or even cell, but not to the table, I think. Other than that, it should work. – Pekka 웃 Nov 19 '09 at 14:29
  • 1
    does not work in chrome. Is ignored as if 6/13/2012 when applied to TR – ladieu Jun 13 '12 at 19:33

I recently solved this problem with a good solution.

CSS:

.avoidBreak { 
    border: 2px solid;
    page-break-inside:avoid;
}

JS:

function Print(){
    $(".tableToPrint td, .tableToPrint th").each(function(){ $(this).css("width",  $(this).width() + "px")  });
    $(".tableToPrint tr").wrap("<div class='avoidBreak'></div>");
    window.print();
}

Works like a charm!

I ended up following @vicenteherrera's approach, with some tweaks (that are possibly bootstrap 3 specific).

Basically; we can't break trs, or tds because they're not block-level elements. So we embed divs into each, and apply our page-break-* rules against the div. Secondly; we add some padding to the top of each of these divs, to compensate for any styling artifacts.

<style>
    @media print {
        /* avoid cutting tr's in half */
        th div, td div {
            margin-top:-8px;
            padding-top:8px;
            page-break-inside:avoid;
        }
    }
</style>
<script>
    $(document).ready(function(){
        // Wrap each tr and td's content within a div
        // (todo: add logic so we only do this when printing)
        $("table tbody th, table tbody td").wrapInner("<div></div>");
    })
</script>

The margin and padding adjustments were necessary to offset some kind of jitter that was being introduced (by my guess - from bootstrap). I'm not sure that I'm presenting any new solution from the other answers to this question, but I figure maybe this will help someone.

I checked many solutions and anyone wasn't working good.

So I tried a small trick and it works:

tfoot with style:position: fixed; bottom: 0px; is placed at the bottom of last page, but if footer is too high it is overlapped by content of table.

tfoot with only: display: table-footer-group; isn't overlapped, but is not on the bottom of last page...

Let's put two tfoot:

TFOOT.placer {
  display: table-footer-group;
  height: 130px;
}

TFOOT.contenter {
  display: table-footer-group;
  position: fixed;
  bottom: 0px;	
  height: 130px;
}
<TFOOT  class='placer'> 
  <TR>
    <TD>
      <!--  empty here
-->
    </TD>
  </TR>
</TFOOT>	
<TFOOT  class='contenter'> 
  <TR>
    <TD>
      your long text or high image here
    </TD>
  </TR>
</TFOOT>

One reserves place on non-last pages, second puts in your accual footer.

I've tried all suggestions given above and found simple and working cross browser solution for this issue. There is no styles or page break needed for this solution. For the solution, the format of the table should be like:

<table>
    <thead>  <!-- there should be <thead> tag-->
        <td>Heading</td> <!--//inside <thead> should be <td> it should not be <th>-->
    </thead>
    <tbody><!---<tbody>also must-->
        <tr>
            <td>data</td>
        </tr>
        <!--100 more rows-->
    </tbody>
</table>

Above format tested and working in cross browsers

  • didn't work for chrome (at least) – AriWais May 11 '17 at 18:28

Well Guys... Most of the Solutions up here didn't worked for. So this is how things worked for me..

HTML

<table>
  <thead>
   <tr>
     <th style="border:none;height:26px;"></th>
     <th style="border:none;height:26px;"></th>
     .
     .
   </tr>
   <tr>
     <th style="border:1px solid black">ABC</th>
     <th style="border:1px solid black">ABC</th>
     .
     .
   <tr>
  </thead>
<tbody>

    //YOUR CODE

</tbody>
</table>

The first set of head is used as a dummy one so that there won't be a missing top border in 2nd head(i.e. original head) while page break.

The accepted answer did not work for me in all browsers, but following css did work for me:

tr    
{ 
  display: table-row-group;
  page-break-inside:avoid; 
  page-break-after:auto;
}

The html structure was:

<table>
  <thead>
    <tr></tr>
  </thead>
  <tbody>
    <tr></tr>
    <tr></tr>
    ...
  </tbody>
</table>

In my case, there were some additional issues with the thead tr, but this resolved the original issue of keeping the table rows from breaking.

Because of the header issues, I ultimately ended up with:

#theTable td *
{
  page-break-inside:avoid;
}

This didn't prevent rows from breaking; just each cell's content.

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.