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I tried to create some basic code using qsort to sort an array of strings, but it crashes in qsort, according to gdb:

#include <string.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

static int pcmp(const void * a, const void * b)
{
  return strcmp(* (char * const *) a, * (char * const *) b);
}
int main()
{
  char pn[10][256];

  memset(pn, 0, sizeof(char) * 10 * 256);

  strcpy(pn[0], "hello");
  strcpy(pn[1], "TEST");
  strcpy(pn[2], "abc");
  strcpy(pn[3], "000000");

  qsort(pn, 4, sizeof (char *), pcmp);
}
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qsort(pn, 4, sizeof (char *), pcmp);

You tell qsort that what you want to sort is an array of 4 char*, but

char pn[10][256];

actually, pn is an array of 10 char[256]. These things are layout-incompatible, and qsort interprets some bytes in the first of the char[256] as char*s. That's undefined behaviour, and not unlikely to cause a segmentation fault.

To fix it for this special case, you can change your comparison to

static int pcmp(const void * a, const void * b)
{
  return strcmp((const char *) a, (const char *) b);
}

and the invocation to

qsort(pn, 4, sizeof pn[0], pcmp);
  • thanks, I didn't know that there was some "layout ideas" internally. I thought it'd just parse strings, skip the zero bytes, parse next string, and not really care about the 256.. – user2316370 Jul 14 '13 at 13:33
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static int pcmp(const void * a, const void * b)
{
  return strcmp( (const char *) a, (const char *) b);
}
int main()
{
  char pn[10][256];

  strcpy(pn[0], "hello");
  strcpy(pn[1], "TEST");
  strcpy(pn[2], "abc");
  strcpy(pn[3], "000000");

  qsort(pn, 4, sizeof (char [256]), pcmp);
  return 0;
}
  • By the way, what is the purpose of making pcmp static? – Dominik C Jul 14 '13 at 12:27
  • @DominikC Ask it him. I feel like I do is enough to cast a strcmp will I. – BLUEPIXY Jul 14 '13 at 12:31
  • It's static cause that's how it was done in the example you get when you do "man qsort". I copy/pasted it sort of. – user2316370 Jul 14 '13 at 12:33
  • @BLUEPIXY Thanks, that works. – user2316370 Jul 14 '13 at 12:39

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