10

I've wanted to prevent even the hiding of base class non-virtual function for a while since I learned C++, and I'm not sure if this would be ethical, but C++ 11 features gave me an idea. Suppose I have the following:

bases.h....

#ifndef baseexample_h
#define baseexample_h

#include <iostream>

class Base{
    public:  
    void foo() {
        std::cout << "Base.foo()\n" << std::endl;
    }
};

class Derived: public Base{ 
    public:
    void foo(){
        std::cout << "Derived.foo()\n" << std::endl;
    }   
};

#endif

and main.cpp...

#include "bases.h"
#include <iostream>

int main()
{

    Base base;
    Derived derived; 

    base.foo();
    derived.foo();

    std::cin.get();

    return 0;
};

for which the output is of course

Base.foo()

Derived.foo()

as the derived foo() function hides the base foo function. I want to prevent possible hiding, So my idea was to change the header file Base definition to:

//.....
class Base{
    public:  
    virtual void foo() final {
        std::cout << "Base.foo()\n" << std::endl;
    }
};

class Derived: public Base{ 
    public:
    void foo(){ //compile error
        std::cout << "Derived.foo()\n" << std::endl;
    }   
};
//......

Which seems to enforce what I want with a compiler error, prevention of overriding AND/OR hiding in c++, but my question is, is this a good practice since foo() was never a virtual function to begin with? Is there a downside to this since i'm kind of abusing the virtual keyword? Thanks.

6
  • 1
    It doesn't even solve the problem completely. You can still hide the foo name, see this demo. – juanchopanza Jul 14 '13 at 17:34
  • Then again, there actually isn't a problem. – Lightness Races in Orbit Jul 14 '13 at 17:37
  • Interesting... OK. Is const the only keyword that changes the prototype enough for this to happen? I might actually even want this behavior, I suppose. – user27886 Jul 14 '13 at 17:37
  • @user27886 the name can be hidden by anything called foo, even a private data member. But concerning member functions, final would only prevent you from overriding void foo(). const, volatile, or arguments would result in hiding. final only prevents overriding, not hiding. – juanchopanza Jul 14 '13 at 17:51
  • ideone.com/fK2p436 no. – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont Jul 14 '13 at 17:51
5

I'd say that, yes, it's bad practice. You introduced polymorphism when you didn't want it, just to prevent name hiding.

But what's so bad about name hiding? Obviously, for whatever reason, the design of Derived desires to hide the function foo in its base class; that is what it does — perhaps it makes its own call to Base::foo then performs some additional activity that is required within Derived.

Trying to subvert that is bad enough; trying to do it by co-opting language features that you don't want is even worse.

If you really need to call the base function, use derived.Base::foo(), but be aware that you are essentially breaking the API of the class Derived, which you should instead use as documented.

1
  • 13
    "Obviously, for whatever reason, the design of Derived desires to hide the function foo in its base class" - Not so obvious; it may be an accidentally similar choice in name or foo may be added to Base after Derived was written and then a simple mistake the compiler/IDE could ideally catch goes undetected until tests/QA. I don't believe C++ has a solution to this problem, but it's a shame. – Sean Middleditch Jul 14 '13 at 22:16

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