122

Is there an easy way to automatically add properties to objects if they don't already exist?

Consider the following example:

var test = {}
test.hello.world = "Hello doesn't exist!"

This doesn't work because hello isn't defined.

The reason why I'm asking this is because I have some existing objects for which I don't know if they allready have hello or not. I actually have a lot of these objects in different parts of my code. It is very annoying to always check if hello exists and if it doesn't create a new object like:

var test = {}
if(test.hello === undefined) test.hello = {}
test.hello.world = "Hello World!"

Is there a way to automatically create an object like hello in this example?

I mean something like that in php:

$test = array();  
$test['hello']['world'] = "Hello world";   
var_dump($test);

Output:

array(1) {
  ["hello"] => array(1) {
    ["world"] => string(11) "Hello world"
  }
}

Ok it's an array but in js arrays it is the same problem as with objects.

5
  • function existcheckthingy(x, y, z){ if(x === undefined) x = {}; x.y = z; } used as existcheckthingy(test.hello, world, "Hello doesn't exist!");
    – bobbybee
    Commented Jul 14, 2013 at 21:30
  • 2
    @bobbybee That won't work. It will create a new object x in the scope of the existcheckthingy function, but that will not then be attached to the test object. You can do better by using the "array-like" notation: existcheckthingy(a,x,y,z) { if (a[x] === undefined) a[x] = {}; a[x][y] = z;}
    – Jeff
    Commented Jul 14, 2013 at 21:36
  • Possible duplicate: stackoverflow.com/questions/7069584/… Commented Jul 14, 2013 at 21:40
  • @Jeff oops, forgot about that :3
    – bobbybee
    Commented Jul 14, 2013 at 21:43
  • 3
    consider lodash 'set' Commented Feb 17, 2016 at 6:03

15 Answers 15

169
var test = {};
test.hello = test.hello || {};
test.hello.world = "Hello world!";

If test.hello is undefined, it gets set to an empty object.

If test.hello was previously defined, it stays unchanged.

var test = {
  hello : {
    foobar : "Hello foobar"
  }
};

test.hello = test.hello || {};
test.hello.world = "Hello World";

console.log(test.hello.foobar); // this is still defined;
console.log(test.hello.world); // as is this.
11
  • this is pretty much idiomatic JS
    – Alnitak
    Commented Jul 14, 2013 at 21:33
  • It's very short thanks for that. But It is still a manual check. Isn't it possibly without? Commented Jul 14, 2013 at 21:33
  • 3
    @MarcelGwerder no, this is as short as it gets.
    – Alnitak
    Commented Jul 14, 2013 at 21:33
  • 1
    @xbonez NB: not "defined" - truthy. However an empty object is actually truthy.
    – Alnitak
    Commented Jul 14, 2013 at 21:36
  • 1
    It will be better if you used the nullish coalescing operator instead of the logical OR operator
    – Ayyoub
    Commented Jan 10, 2021 at 16:37
87

You can use the Logical nullish assignment (??=):

var test = {};
(test.hello ??= {}).world ??= "Hello doesn't exist!";
4
  • 9
    This is the best answer as of 2021 Commented Apr 28, 2021 at 17:12
  • 1
    Best answer. Should be go up!!
    – jeffbRTC
    Commented Apr 29, 2021 at 12:25
  • 8
    Should be (test.hello ??= {}).world = "Hello doesn't exist!"; otherwise if test.hello.world already exists it will not be overwritten.
    – Motla
    Commented Oct 28, 2021 at 9:43
  • be aware that this also sets test.hello if it is null (not only if it is undefined)
    – jo3rn
    Commented Sep 28, 2023 at 6:15
22

New object

myObj = {};

recursive function

function addProps(obj, arr, val) {

    if (typeof arr == 'string')
        arr = arr.split(".");

    obj[arr[0]] = obj[arr[0]] || {};

    var tmpObj = obj[arr[0]];

    if (arr.length > 1) {
        arr.shift();
        addProps(tmpObj, arr, val);
    }
    else
        obj[arr[0]] = val;

    return obj;

}

Call it with a dot notated string

addProps(myObj, 'sub1.sub2.propA', 1);

or with an array

addProps(myObj, ['sub1', 'sub2', 'propA'], 1);

and your object will look like this

myObj = {
  "sub1": {
    "sub2": {
      "propA": 1
    }
  }
};

It works with non-empty objects too!

2
  • 1
    this actually works really neatly, and updates the correct value without breaking my object.
    – RozzA
    Commented Apr 12, 2017 at 1:02
  • 1
    For anyone implementing this in Typescript, the object's type can be defined as type RecursiveObject = { [key: number | string]: RecursiveObject | any };
    – IcyIcicle
    Commented Jun 24, 2022 at 2:48
7

You won't be able to do this without some sort of function, as JavaScript doesn't have a generic getter/setter method for objects (Python, for example, has __getattr__). Here's one way to do it:

function add_property(object, key, value) {
    var keys = key.split('.');

    while (keys.length > 1) {
        var k = keys.shift();

        if (!object.hasOwnProperty(k)) {
            object[k] = {};
        }

        object = object[k];
    }

    object[keys[0]] = value;
}

If you really want to, you could add it to the prototype of Object. You can call it like so:

> var o = {}
> add_property(o, 'foo.bar.baz', 12)
> o.foo.bar.baz
12
3
  • something is wrong with this function when used repetitively on the same object
    – RozzA
    Commented Apr 12, 2017 at 0:57
  • @RozzA: Thanks for catching that bug, it's now fixed.
    – Blender
    Commented Apr 12, 2017 at 4:12
  • @Blender is there a possibility to read value of property like read_property(o, 'foo.bar.baz') will return 12 ? after a property is added Commented Dec 28, 2017 at 7:06
7

Here's a cool version with proxies:

const myUpsert = (input) => {
    const handler = {
        get: (obj, prop) => {
            obj[prop] = obj[prop] || {};
            return myUpsert(obj[prop]);
        }
    };
    return new Proxy(input, handler);
};

And you use it like this:

myUpsert(test).hello.world = '42';

This will add all the missing properties as empty objects, and leave the existing ones untouched. It's really just a proxied version of the classic test.hello = test.hello || {}, albeit much slower (See benchmark here.) But it's also much nicer to look at, especially if you'll be doing it more than one level deep. I wouldn't pick it for performance-heavy data crunching, but it's probably fast enough for a front-end state update (as in Redux).

Note that there's some implicit assumptions here:

  1. The intervening properties are either objects or non-existent. This will choke if test.hello is a string, for example.
  2. That you always want to be doing this for as long as you're using the Proxy instead of the original object.

These are pretty easily mitigated if you only use it in well-bounded contexts (like a reducer body) where there's little chance of accidentally returning the Proxy, and not much else you would want to do with the object.

5

Well you could extend the prototype of Object with a function that return a property, but adds it first, if it doesn't exist:

Object.prototype.getOrCreate = function (prop) {
    if (this[prop] === undefined) {
        this[prop] = {};
    }
    return this[prop];
};

var obj = {};

obj.getOrCreate("foo").getOrCreate("bar").val = 1;
2
  • 1
    this seems like a great solution however it breaks DataTables for some reason. Is messing with object internals considered a good idea normally? Commented Mar 9, 2017 at 2:41
  • This is why extending native objects can be a bad idea, because methods might overlap. Commented Mar 21, 2017 at 8:34
2
var test = {}
if(!test.hasOwnProperty('hello')) {
    test.hello = {};
}
test.hello.world = "Hello World!"
2

This will add a property hello whose value is {world: 'Hello world!'} to the test object, if it doesn't exist. If you have a lot of these objects, you can just iterate over them and apply this function. Note: uses lodash.js

var test = {};
_.defaults(test, { hello: {world: 'Hello world!'} });    

Which is actually a convenience method for saying:

var defaults = _.partialRight(_.assign, function(a, b) {
  return typeof a == 'undefined' ? b : a;
});        
defaults(test, { hello: {world: 'Hello world!'} });

Note: _.defaults uses loops to achieve the same thing as the second block.

P.S. Checkout https://stackoverflow.com/a/17197858/1218080

1
  • 2
    _.set({}, 'a.b.c.d', "asdf") will create '{"a":{"b":{"c":{"d":"asdf"}}}}', and might be more what he was looking for Commented Feb 17, 2016 at 6:03
2

let test = {};
test = {...test, hello: {...test.hello, world: 'Hello does exist!'}};
console.log(test);

When using the spread operator, the value can be undefined, it'll automatically create an object.

1
  • Note that this creates a copy of test, so it won't refer to the original object, it also has some repetition (you have to specify the hello parameter twice), and it's not the most readable code for newbies to understand.
    – Simon E.
    Commented May 9 at 5:40
2

I think the easiest way is to use _.set from Lodash

 _.set({}, 'a[0].b.c', 4);
// => { a: [{ b: { c: 4 } }] }
2
  • Interesting library for JS ! thx for posting this..
    – Goodies
    Commented May 15, 2021 at 19:32
  • Happy to help 😁 Commented May 16, 2021 at 18:25
1

I've come up with something, really custom as well, but it works as far as I have tested.

function dotted_put_var(str,val) {
    var oper=str.split('.');
    var p=window;
    for (var i=0;i<oper.length-1;i++) {
        var x=oper[i];
        p[x]=p[x]||{};
        p=p[x];
    }
    p[oper.pop()]=val;
}

Then, a complex variable can be set like this, ensuring that every links will be created if not already:

dotter_put_var('test.hello.world', 'testvalue'); // test.hello.world="testvalue";

See this working FIDDLE.

1

I use this:

Object.prototype.initProperty = function(name, defaultValue) {
  if (!(name in this)) this[name] = defaultValue;
};

You can later do f.e.:

var x = {a: 1};
x.initProperty("a", 2); // will not change property a
x.initProperty("b", 3); // will define property b
console.log(x); // => {a: 1, b: 3}
1
var test = {}
test.hello.world = "Hello doesn't exist!"

This will throw an error obviously as you didn't defined the test.hello

Firstly you need to need define the hello key then inside you can assign any key. But if you want to create key if not exists then you can do following thing

test.hello = test.hello || {};

The above statement will create the test.hello object if not defined and if it is defined then it will assign the same value as it is previously

Now you can assign any new key inside the test.hello

test.hello.world = "Everything works perfect";

test.hello.world2 = 'With another key too, it works perfect';
0

I've made some changes on columbus's answer to allow create arrays:

function addProps(obj, arr, val) {

  if (typeof arr == 'string')
    arr = arr.split(".");

  var tmpObj, isArray = /^(.*)\[(\d+)\]$/.exec(arr[0])
  if (isArray && !Number.isNaN(isArray[2])) {
    obj[isArray[1]] = obj[isArray[1]] || [];
    obj[isArray[1]][isArray[2]] = obj[isArray[1]][isArray[2]] || {}
    tmpObj = obj[isArray[1]][isArray[2]];
  } else {
    obj[arr[0]] = obj[arr[0]] || {};
    tmpObj = obj[arr[0]];
  }

  if (arr.length > 1) {
    arr.shift();
    addProps(tmpObj, arr, val);
  } else
    obj[arr[0]] = val;

  return obj;

}


var myObj = {}
addProps(myObj, 'sub1[0].sub2.propA', 1)
addProps(myObj, 'sub1[1].sub2.propA', 2)

console.log(myObj)

I think that is possible to allow use "sub1[].sub2..." to just push into the sub1 array, instead of specify the index, but that's enough for me now.

0

Option 1:

Use Object.assign:

var test = {};
Object.assign(test, { hello: { world: "hello world" }});

console.log(test.hello.world); // "hello world"

Option 2:

Use Destructuring assignment:

var test = {};
test = {...test, ...{ hello: { world: "hello world" }}};

console.log(test.hello.world); // "hello world"

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