24

I have made a program that divides numbers and then returns the number, But the thing is that when it returns the number it has a decimal like this:

2.0

But I want it to give me:

2

so is there anyway I can do this?

Thanks in Advance!

  • Please show us your code. – martineau Jul 15 '13 at 10:01
  • 2
    you can also use integer division with // that always give a int, for example 1//2 that give 0 – Copperfield Jan 5 '16 at 15:46
45

You can call int() on the end result:

>>> int(2.0)
2
  • 2
    ValueError: invalid literal for int() with base 10: '68.0' – Liza Jul 11 '15 at 4:32
  • 2
    @Kyrie You can do int(float('68.0')) – TerryA Jul 11 '15 at 23:39
  • 5
    @TerryA It won't work in case of int(1.9999999999999999999), how can I just remove the decimals? – Bear Aug 24 '16 at 17:59
  • 2
    @Bear math.floor(1.9999999999999999999) – hobbes3 Feb 21 at 1:49
26

When a number as a decimal it is usually a float in Python.

If you want to remove the decimal and keep it an integer (int). You can call the int() method on it like so...

>>> int(2.0)
2

However, int rounds down so...

>>> int(2.9)
2

If you want to round to the nearest integer you can use round:

>>> round(2.9)
3.0
>>> round(2.4)
2.0

And then call int() on that:

>>> int(round(2.9))
3
>>> int(round(2.4))
2
  • If this helped you, you could Accept my Answer – Inbar Rose Jul 15 '13 at 11:31
  • 1
    What if it is a large number? – Jeff Apr 7 '14 at 19:16
  • @Jeff Why don't you check yourself? Python does not have a problem with the size of numbers. – Inbar Rose Apr 9 '14 at 6:49
  • Thanks! I realized that a bit after I posted. For whatever reason, I thought that a unix date format would be too large a number, but I was wrong! – Jeff Apr 9 '14 at 14:13
2

You could probably do like below

# p and q are the numbers to be divided
if p//q==p/q:
    print(p//q)
else:
    print(p/q)
1
>>> int(2.0)

You will get the answer as 2

  • 6
    What does this add that isn't already present in the other answers? – Mark Dickinson Jan 5 '16 at 14:15
0
def devision(a, b):
    return a / b if a % b else a // b
0

There is a math function modf() that will break this up as well.

import math

print("math.modf(3.14159) : ", math.modf(3.14159))

will output a tuple: math.modf(3.14159) : (0.14159, 3.0)

This is useful if you want to keep both the whole part and decimal for reference like:

decimal, whole = math.modf(3.14159)

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