4
n = [3, 5, 7]

def double(lst):
    for x in lst:
        x *= 2
        print x
    return lst

print double(n)

Why doesn't this return n = [6, 10, 14]?

There should also be a better solution that looks something like [x *=2 for x in lst] but it doesn't work either.

Any other tips about for-loops and lists would be much appreciated.

7 Answers 7

13

Why doesn't this return n = [6, 10, 14]?

Because n, or lst as it is called inside double, is never modified. x *= 2 is equivalent to x = x * 2 for numbers x, and that only re-binds the name x without changing the object it references.

To see this, modify double as follows:

def double(lst):
    for i, x in enumerate(lst):
        x *= 2
        print("x = %s" % x)
        print("lst[%d] = %s" % (i, lst[i]))

To change a list of numbers in-place, you have to reassign its elements:

def double(lst):
    for i in xrange(len(lst)):
        lst[i] *= 2

If you don't want to modify it in-place, use a comprehension:

def double(lst):
    return [x * 2 for x in lst]
1
  • Thanks. I get it now.
    – jane
    Jul 15, 2013 at 17:11
3
n = [3, 5, 7]

def double(lst):
    for x in lst:
        x *= 2
        print x # item value changed and printed
    return lst # original lst returned

print double(n)

you only modified item value inside a list and printed its number but returning original lst list. [x *=2 for x in lst] is wrong syntax, the correct way to write is [x*2 for x in lst]. Another way is to use lambda with map:

print(list(map(lambda x:x*2,[1,2,3])))

Note: print((lambda x:x*2)([1,2,3])) will give wrong answer, it outputs in [1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3] same as doing [1,2,3]*2

2

You can use list comprehension for this:

FUNCTION:

def double(lst):
    return [i*2 for i in lst]

DEMO:

n = [3, 5, 7]
print(double(n))

OUTPUT:

[6, 10, 14]

In python multiplying a list itself will produce this:

print([1, 2]*4)
# [1, 2, 1, 2, 1, 2, 1, 2]

Therefore what you need is to multiply the items of the list, that's why you use for-loop in the first place, to iterate thru the list.

1

The problem is that you modify x; however, modifying x doesn't change the elements of the list.

If you want to multiply every element by two, use map:

map(lambda(x):x*2, lst)
3
  • I have yet to figure out how to use map. Thanks though.
    – jane
    Jul 15, 2013 at 17:11
  • Basically, you apply the function to every element of the list. The function is the first argument of map, and the list is in the second.
    – jh314
    Jul 15, 2013 at 17:19
  • I would suggested that a list comprehension is the more Pythonic approach to the problem presented.
    – jwpfox
    Jul 15, 2013 at 17:36
0

The list comprehension solution looks differently:

n = [3, 5, 7]
n = [x*2 for x in n]
0
a_list = [2,3,4,5,10]                         
def double_ult(lst):
    y = []                        
    for i in range(len(lst)):
        lst[i] *= 2
        y += [lst[i]]                     
    return y

print(double_ult(a_list))

result: [4, 6, 8, 10, 20]

with .append() method:

b_list = [2,3,4,5,10]
def double_append(lst):
    y = []
    for i in lst:
        lst = 2 * i
        y.append(lst)
    return y

print(double_append(b_list))

result: [4, 6, 8, 10, 20]

enter code here

-1

You can also use this code to double your elements in the list:

a_list = [3, 5, 7]

multiplied_list = [element * 2 for element in a_list]

print(multiplied_list)

Output = [6, 10, 14

1
  • 1
    Welcome to StackOverflow! This solution is already proposed in another answers including the accepted one. Please make sure that your contribution adds something new to the question or the answers before posting it. Feb 25, 2021 at 11:14

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