122

I have @Autowired service which has to be used from within a static method. I know this is wrong but I cannot change the current design as it would require a lot of work, so I need some simple hack for that. I can't change randomMethod() to be non-static and I need to use this autowired bean. Any clues how to do that?

@Service
public class Foo {
    public int doStuff() {
        return 1;
    }
}

public class Boo {
    @Autowired
    Foo foo;

    public static void randomMethod() {
         foo.doStuff();
    }
}
3
  • 4
    A static method cannot reference a non-static/instance field. Jul 15, 2013 at 17:17
  • 25
    that is why I created this thread, is there a way that Autowired instance could be accessed from within static method...
    – Taks
    Jul 15, 2013 at 17:22
  • Why is using @Autowired in static method wrong?
    – user59290
    May 13, 2020 at 9:39

7 Answers 7

175

You can do this by following one of the solutions:

Using constructor @Autowired

This approach will construct the bean requiring some beans as constructor parameters. Within the constructor code you set the static field with the value got as parameter for constructor execution. Sample:

@Component
public class Boo {

    private static Foo foo;

    @Autowired
    public Boo(Foo foo) {
        Boo.foo = foo;
    }

    public static void randomMethod() {
         foo.doStuff();
    }
}

Using @PostConstruct to hand value over to static field

The idea here is to hand over a bean to a static field after bean is configured by spring.

@Component
public class Boo {

    private static Foo foo;
    @Autowired
    private Foo tFoo;

    @PostConstruct
    public void init() {
        Boo.foo = tFoo;
    }

    public static void randomMethod() {
         foo.doStuff();
    }
}
11
  • 3
    is this a safe solution?
    – Taks
    Jul 15, 2013 at 17:51
  • 3
    I used the first solution and it worked like a charm, thanks ! Jul 13, 2016 at 10:43
  • 1
    First solution doesn't support use of @Qualifier. It remains problematic if using several Repositories. Dec 16, 2016 at 12:15
  • 22
    What will guarantee that the constructor is called before the static method is accessed? Aug 18, 2017 at 20:34
  • 2
    init method will cause SonarQube bug because non-static method modifying static field. Oct 16, 2018 at 17:19
50

You have to workaround this via static application context accessor approach:

@Component
public class StaticContextAccessor {

    private static StaticContextAccessor instance;

    @Autowired
    private ApplicationContext applicationContext;

    @PostConstruct
    public void registerInstance() {
        instance = this;
    }

    public static <T> T getBean(Class<T> clazz) {
        return instance.applicationContext.getBean(clazz);
    }

}

Then you can access bean instances in a static manner.

public class Boo {

    public static void randomMethod() {
         StaticContextAccessor.getBean(Foo.class).doStuff();
    }

}
4
  • I actually like this solution although I dont fully understand it.. Im just getting my head around spring and I need to quickly refactor some piece of code.. and this is the issue of mixing static with autowired.. how safe is this solution?
    – Taks
    Jul 15, 2013 at 17:53
  • 2
    It is fairly safe if the static calls are under your control. The most obvious negative aspect is that it can happen that you will call getBean before the context is initialized (NPE) or after the context with its beans is destroyed. This approach has its benefit that the "ugly" static context access is enclosed in one method / class. Jul 15, 2013 at 18:25
  • 1
    This saved my life. Its very useful over the other approach.
    – phoenix
    Jan 18, 2015 at 11:18
  • This is a working solution, just don't forget to annotate Boo as @Component.
    – Cortex
    Jan 1, 2021 at 16:35
8

What you can do is @Autowired a setter method and have it set a new static field.

public class Boo {
    @Autowired
    Foo foo;

    static Foo staticFoo;   

    @Autowired
    public void setStaticFoo(Foo foo) {
        Boo.staticFoo = foo;
    }

    public static void randomMethod() {
         staticFoo.doStuff();
    }
}

When the bean gets processed, Spring will inject a Foo implementation instance into the instance field foo. It will then also inject the same Foo instance into the setStaticFoo() argument list, which will be used to set the static field.

This is a terrible workaround and will fail if you try to use randomMethod() before Spring has processed an instance of Boo.

5
  • would using @PostConstruct help ?
    – Taks
    Jul 15, 2013 at 17:56
  • @Taks Sure, that works too. On setStaticFoo() that is, without the Foo parameter. Jul 15, 2013 at 17:58
  • the question is would it make it safer.. :) I thought that spring would process everything before allowing us to execute any methods..
    – Taks
    Jul 15, 2013 at 18:04
  • 1
    @Taks The way you showed it doesn't work (unless you were showing pseudo code). Any clues how to do that? The multiple answers you got are workarounds but they all have the same problem that you cannot use the static field until Spring processes your class (actually processing one instance that has a side-effect). In that sense, it isn't safe. Jul 15, 2013 at 19:40
  • I'm trying to use this implementation inside of a library and inject it as a dependency into another project. But when it is called by the importing project Annotation PostConstruct methods, the bean hasn't been Annotation Autowired yet unless I inject the library's bean manually or use Annotation DependsOn in the importing project class using the Annotation PostConstruct. Is there a way to force this implementation to be called before the caller Annotation PostConstruct?
    – White_King
    May 12, 2021 at 9:46
4

The easiest way to create a static context is naturally, when the application starts up. This will prevent the need for an unnatural implementation with an additional class.

@SpringBootApplication
public class MyApplication {

    private static ApplicationContext appContext;


    public static void main(String[] args) {
        appContext = SpringApplication.run(MyApplication.class, args);
    }

    public static ApplicationContext getAppContext() {
        return appContext;
    }
}

Then, anywhere you need to access a bean statically, you can use the ApplicationContext to get the instance of the class.

public class Boo {
    public static void randomMethod() {
         MyApplication.getAppContext()
                            .getBean(Foo.class).doStuff();
    }
}

Regards..

3

It sucks but you can get the bean by using the ApplicationContextAware interface. Something like :

public class Boo implements ApplicationContextAware {

    private static ApplicationContext appContext;

    @Autowired
    Foo foo;

    public static void randomMethod() {
         Foo fooInstance = appContext.getBean(Foo.class);
         fooInstance.doStuff();
    }

    @Override
    public void setApplicationContext(ApplicationContext appContext) {
        Boo.appContext = appContext;
    }
}
0
0

This builds upon @Pavel's answer, to solve the possibility of Spring context not being initialized when accessing from the static getBean method:

@Component
public class Spring {
  private static final Logger LOG = LoggerFactory.getLogger (Spring.class);

  private static Spring spring;

  @Autowired
  private ApplicationContext context;

  @PostConstruct
  public void registerInstance () {
    spring = this;
  }

  private Spring (ApplicationContext context) {
    this.context = context;
  }

  private static synchronized void initContext () {
    if (spring == null) {
      LOG.info ("Initializing Spring Context...");
      ApplicationContext context = new AnnotationConfigApplicationContext (io.zeniq.spring.BaseConfig.class);
      spring = new Spring (context);
    }
  }

  public static <T> T getBean(String name, Class<T> className) throws BeansException {
    initContext();
    return spring.context.getBean(name, className);
  }

  public static <T> T getBean(Class<T> className) throws BeansException {
    initContext();
    return spring.context.getBean(className);
  }

  public static AutowireCapableBeanFactory getBeanFactory() throws IllegalStateException {
    initContext();
    return spring.context.getAutowireCapableBeanFactory ();
  }
}

The important piece here is the initContext method. It ensures that the context will always get initialized. But, do note that initContext will be a point of contention in your code as it is synchronized. If your application is heavily parallelized (for eg: the backend of a high traffic site), this might not be a good solution for you.

-2

Use AppContext. Make sure you create a bean in your context file.

private final static Foo foo = AppContext.getApplicationContext().getBean(Foo.class);

public static void randomMethod() {
     foo.doStuff();
}
2
  • What is this?? Whats the difference between @Autowired and getBean Feb 18, 2016 at 8:28
  • It is usual when you can't turn the class into a regular spring @Component, it happens a lot with legacy code. Oct 8, 2017 at 23:50

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