I reset my local master to a commit by this command:

git reset --hard e3f1e37

when I enter $ git status command, terminal says:

# On branch master
# Your branch is behind 'origin/master' by 7 commits, and can be fast-forwarded.

#   (use "git pull" to update your local branch)
#
nothing to commit, working directory clean

Since I want to reset origin/header as well, I checkout to origin/master:

$ git checkout origin/master
Note: checking out 'origin/master'.

You are in 'detached HEAD' state. You can look around, make experimental
changes and commit them, and you can discard any commits you make in this
state without impacting any branches by performing another checkout.

If you want to create a new branch to retain commits you create, you may
do so (now or later) by using -b with the checkout command again. Example:

  git checkout -b new_branch_name

HEAD is now at 2aef1de... master problem fixed for master. its okay now.

and reset the header by this command:

$ git reset --hard e3f1e37
HEAD is now at e3f1e37 development version code incremented for new build.

Then I tried to add commit to origin/header that I was not successful.

$ git commit -m "Reverting to the state of the project at e3f1e37"
# HEAD detached from origin/master
nothing to commit, working directory clean

Finally, I checkout to my local master.

$ git checkout master
Switched to branch 'master'
Your branch is behind 'origin/master' by 7 commits, and can be fast-forwarded.
  (use "git pull" to update your local branch)

Since, I reset the head of origin/master I expect local and origin should be in same direction but as you see, git is saying that my local/master is behind origin/master by 7 commits.

How can I fix this issue? The things that I'm looking for is Head of local/master and origin/master point to same commit. Following image shows what I did. Thanks.

enter image description here

up vote 413 down vote accepted

origin/xxx branches are always pointer to a remote. You cannot check them out as they're not pointer to your local repository (you only checkout the commit. That's why you won't see the name written in the command line interface branch marker, only the commit hash).

What you need to do to update the remote is to force push your local changes to master:

git checkout master
git reset --hard e3f1e37
git push --force origin master
# Then to prove it (it won't print any diff)
git diff master..origin/master
  • 4
    Exactly, you did it thanks :) – Hesam Jul 16 '13 at 2:34
  • 6
    that does the requested operation, but keep in mind that it will make unhappy those people who already pulled the commits from master. – mnagel Jul 16 '13 at 6:13
  • I followed this steps and it rolled back. But the origin/HEAD is now pointing to a branch other than master. What can I do to fix this? – Daniil Shevelev Dec 20 '13 at 20:29
  • 1
    You shouldn't care about origin/HEAD, simply push the good ref to origin/ref – Simon Boudrias Dec 20 '13 at 20:53
  • Agreed, had to do this today after accidentally merging the wrong branches together then pushing to origin. It works well, but it could be very disruptive if other people have been checking out the affected branches from origin. Use with caution. – Nick W. May 9 '14 at 1:05

The solution found here helped us to update master to a previous commit that had already been pushed:

git checkout master
git reset --hard e3f1e37
git push --force origin e3f1e37:master

The key difference from the accepted answer is the commit hash "e3f1e37:" before master in the push command.

  • 1
    Doesn't work: remote: error: denying non-fast-forward refs/heads/master (you should pull first) – m0skit0 Jan 16 '15 at 10:37
  • @m0skit0 as the message say's you should pull first :) – intuitivepixel Mar 16 '15 at 19:50
  • The answer to this is at stackoverflow.com/a/10544328/1019307 - git config receive.denynonfastforwards false but actually I set that manually in my local git repository I have in /opt/git that I created to play with the ideas here. I'm not sure how or if can do this for bitbucket, github etc... And @intuitivepixel that is pointless as it reverse what you were trying to achieve with the hard reset. – HankCa Jul 18 '15 at 13:30
  • Hi @jkovacs, I don't want new changes in master to be removed. I just want to push that commit hash "e3f1e37" to origin master. Is it possible by skipping the 2nd command git reset --hard "e3f1e37"? – KarenAnne Aug 17 '15 at 3:34
  • Hi @jkovacs, I just confirmed that I can skip the 2nd step. :) – KarenAnne Aug 17 '15 at 3:45

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