9

If have a list of items with date field which is ordered by date. I want to group these items by date somethings like;

Date1

  • item1

Date2

  • item2
  • item3

and so forth...

What I have is this;

<ul>
    <li ng-repeat="listing in listings | filter:query">
        <h1 ng-show="$index === 0 || listings[$index - 1].created !== listing.created">
            {{listing.created | date:mediumDate}}
        </h1>
        {{listing.title}}
    </li>
</ul>

But this way h1 element becomes the child of li element which messes up presentation. Is there some other way to write this ng-repeat the way I want?

2
  • Can you re-organize your data/model object so that this hierarchy is represented as an array of objects that each has an array? If you do it this way you can nest the ng-repeats. You can apply the first ng-repeat to a div that wraps the date header and list, then use the second ng-repeat on the li within a list. Jul 16 '13 at 4:01
  • I am using flask-restless on the server side, so I guess no. I can do that arrangement in the controller but I am using infinite scroll and rearranging the object array all the time didn't seem very elegant. But so far this seems like the only solution.
    – cashmere
    Jul 16 '13 at 4:06
3

I have a solution that might not work depending on the number of items in your list.

My idea was to apply a filter to transform a simple list into a hierarchical one.

Here's a working jsFiddle. (See the new one at the bottom, really!)

The idea is simple, take an existing list, and rearrange it on-the-fly:

<div ng-repeat="g in items | groupBy:'group' | orderBy:'group'">
    <h2>{{g.group}}</h2>
    <ul>
        <li ng-repeat="item in g.items | orderBy:'title'">{{item.id}}. {{item.title}}</li>
    </ul>
</div>

In this case, we've take the original array, and applied a groupBy filter on it. This filter is actually sort of complex, because it needs to make sure it doesn't modify the array more than necessary, so it has to store a deep copy of the original array to compare against. If you remove that deep copy and inspection, you will end up with $digest iteration errors every time.

Edit: See bottom for a modified version that performs shallower copies of the array

Here's the filter code:

app.filter("groupBy", function() {
    var mArr = null,
        mGroupBy = null,
        mRetArr = null;
    return function(arr, groupBy) {
        if(!angular.equals(mArr, arr) || mGroupBy !== groupBy) {
            mArr = angular.copy(arr);
            mGroupBy = groupBy;
            mRetArr = [];
            var groups = {};
            angular.forEach(arr, function(item) {
                var groupValue = item[groupBy]
                if(groups[groupValue]) {
                    groups[groupValue].items.push(item);
                } else {
                    groups[groupValue] = {
                        items: [item]
                    };
                    groups[groupValue][groupBy] = groupValue;
                    mRetArr.push(groups[groupValue]);
                }
            });
        }
        return mRetArr;
    };
});

(mArr, mGroupBy, and mRetArr are the "memoized" values, here.)

What's nice about this filter is that it doesn't require that the data come in already grouped. The jsFiddle linked above include a button to dynamically add items to the array at the end, but they still end up sorted into groups.

Again, the real caveat is that it could be slow and/or expensive based on the number of items in your list. Hundreds of moderately-complex items should be OK, but if you have thousands, you should pre-sort them somewhere else before they get to the scope.


Edit: Much better version

At the cost of more code complexity, I modified the filter to copy only the key information instead of deeply copying the whole array. This time, I make a hashmap of the groups containing the items. The items are still referenced, but this time it's an explicit reference, so modifying an item in the tree will not force a resort, but changing an item's group or adding or removing an item will.

New fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/hhWaX/2/

And here's the new filter:

app.filter("groupBy", function() {
    var mArr = null,
        mGroupBy = null,
        mRetArr = null,
        getMemoArr = function(arr, groupBy) {
            var ret = {};
            angular.forEach(arr, function(item){
                var groupValue = item[groupBy];
                if(ret[groupValue]) {
                    ret[groupValue].push(item);
                } else {
                    ret[groupValue] = [item];
                }
            });
            return ret;
        };
    return function(arr, groupBy) {
        var newMemoArr = getMemoArr(arr, groupBy);
        if(mGroupBy !== groupBy || !angular.equals(mArr, newMemoArr)) {
            mArr = newMemoArr;
            mGroupBy = groupBy;
            mRetArr = [];
            var groups = {};
            angular.forEach(arr, function(item) {
                var groupValue = item[groupBy]
                if(groups[groupValue]) {
                    groups[groupValue].items.push(item);
                } else {
                    groups[groupValue] = {
                        items: [item]
                    };
                    groups[groupValue][groupBy] = groupValue;
                    mRetArr.push(groups[groupValue]);
                }
            });
        }
        return mRetArr;
    };
});

It's a lot more complicated, but this one should have significantly better performance over large sets, because there is the absolute minimum of duplication of the original array.

4
  • In theory, if you knew the group would never change for any of the items, you could replace the deep copy (angular.copy(...)) with a shallow copy that only copied over the items themselves. There may be some magical way to store the items along with their original groups, too. Jul 16 '13 at 7:35
  • And, for the hell of it, here's a version that can take a function to determine the groupBy value: jsfiddle.net/9dpN2/1 Jul 16 '13 at 8:07
  • I just realized I made the memoization global by accident. I think. If I am correct, then using this filter twice within the same app/module may not work. It's too late, I'll think about later! Jul 16 '13 at 8:29
  • Great answer ty. And thanks for the bonus groupBy that can take a function.
    – cashmere
    Jul 16 '13 at 14:05
1
<li class="divider" ng-if="FormsList[$index].FORM_GROUP!=FormsList[$index-1].FORM_GROUP">

Works perfectly for me. like this

<input type="text" class="form-control" placeholder="Search Form..." ng-model="selectedForm">

<ul class="nav nav-pills nav-stacked" role="menu" ng-repeat="Form in FormsList | filter:selectedForm">
    <li class="divider" ng-if="FormsList[$index].FORM_GROUP!=FormsList[$index-1].FORM_GROUP">{{Form.FORM_GROUP}}</li>
    <li><a href="#" ng-click="LoadPDF(Form.LOCATION)">{{Form.LINK}}</a></li>
</ul>

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