1

I am running into a weird issue. I wrote a simple c program (two source files, relevant sections shown below). When I run the program (a.c has the main function), I get the output (since the number of times I am calling "process" is high, I am printing the last few print outs from the output to the screen):

key: 'Q'
key: 'A'
1
key: 'A'
key: 'A'
1
key: 'A'
key: 'A'
1
key: 'A'
key: 'A'
key: 'C'
Segmentation fault (core dumped)

a.c

void process(int* hash, char* input, int number_of_ac) {
   int value, i = 0;
   for(; i < number_of_ac; i++) {
      value = get_value(hash, input[i]);
      printf("1\n");
      increment_value(hash, input[i]);
   }
}

b.c

int get_value(int* hash, char key) {
   printf("key: '%c'\n", key);
   return hash[get_index(key)];
}

void increment_value(int* hash, char key) {
   int value = get_value(hash, key);
   hash[get_index(key)] = ++value;
}

My question specifically is (the ultimate goal is for me to try to debug why I am getting a segmentation fault on a high number of "process" calls and not on a smaller number of calls), shouldn't I see a print out like this:

key: 'Q'
1
key: 'A'
1
key: 'A'
1
key: 'A'
etc.

Why do I see a print of two letters before I see the 1 again? Is this a buffer reordering issue of my statements being printed to the screen? Or, is it somehow my c program is multi-threading behind the scene?

By the way, this exact same program runs on my laptop with a MUCH LARGER set of input:

Linux ubuntu 3.8.0-25-generic #37-Ubuntu SMP Thu Jun 6 20:47:07 UTC 2013 x86_64 x86_64 x86_64 GNU/Linux

But it breaks with the Segmentation Fault above on a much smaller input on another machine:

Linux x.y.z 2.6.32-279.19.1.el6.cny6.7068.x86_64 #1 SMP Mon Mar 11 08:59:43 CDT 2013 x86_64 x86_64 x86_64 GNU/Linux

Any ideas? I appreciate your assistance!

  • The compiler won't be secretly multithreading your code. The seg-fault is a clear indicator that you've got undefined behaviour somewhere. You're probably overflowing a buffer somewhere, but there's not enough information here; I suggest constructing a minimal test-case. – Oliver Charlesworth Jul 16 '13 at 23:32
  • Since increment_value calls get_value and you call each of these every time through your loop, I would not expect to see the results you are expecting to see. I would expect to see something closer to what you are actually seeing. The printf of the key will occur twice for every loop iteration, and the printf of 1 only once. – lurker Jul 16 '13 at 23:35
1

Look how you call increment value:

void increment_value(int* hash, char key) {
   int value = get_value(hash, key); // calling get_value
   hash[get_index(key)] = ++value;
}

so you are printing a char here and you call get_value again in process function. That why you are getting multiples prints of chars before '1'

  • It's my mistake. I should have seen that call. I spent most of my time extracting relevant code and thinking about the seg fault that I didn't notice my own function calling get_value twice before the print of 1. – user2589308 Jul 17 '13 at 0:51

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