50
import pandas as pd
date_stngs = ('2008-12-20','2008-12-21','2008-12-22','2008-12-23')

a = pd.Series(range(4),index = (range(4)))

for idx, date in enumerate(date_stngs):
    a[idx]= pd.to_datetime(date)

This code bit produces error:

TypeError:" 'int' object is not iterable"

Can anyone tell me how to get this series of date time strings into a DataFrame as DateTime objects?

55
>>> import pandas as pd
>>> date_stngs = ('2008-12-20','2008-12-21','2008-12-22','2008-12-23')
>>> a = pd.Series([pd.to_datetime(date) for date in date_stngs])
>>> a
0    2008-12-20 00:00:00
1    2008-12-21 00:00:00
2    2008-12-22 00:00:00
3    2008-12-23 00:00:00

UPDATE

Use pandas.to_datetime(pd.Series(..)). It's concise and much faster than above code.

>>> pd.to_datetime(pd.Series(date_stngs))
0   2008-12-20 00:00:00
1   2008-12-21 00:00:00
2   2008-12-22 00:00:00
3   2008-12-23 00:00:00
  • 12
    Hundred times slower than pd.to_datetime(pd.Series(date_stngs)). Strongly not recommend this method. – waitingkuo Jul 17 '13 at 5:45
  • @DickEshelman, waitingkuo's version is more elegant solution. – falsetru Jul 17 '13 at 6:07
  • @waitingkuo, I agree that your version is more concise. But your version is not 100x faster than than mine. timeit.timeit mine, yours, shows very little difference. – falsetru Jul 17 '13 at 6:14
  • 4
    @waitingkuo, I upgraded to 0.11.0. You were right. Shame on me. – falsetru Jul 17 '13 at 6:48
  • 1
    @FermionPortal, It's almost same for me. (Python 2.7.8, pandas 0.14.1, Windows 7): pastebin.com/m1u9Prn6 – falsetru Dec 18 '14 at 14:40
38
In [46]: pd.to_datetime(pd.Series(date_stngs))
Out[46]: 
0   2008-12-20 00:00:00
1   2008-12-21 00:00:00
2   2008-12-22 00:00:00
3   2008-12-23 00:00:00
dtype: datetime64[ns]

Update: benchmark

In [43]: dates = [(dt.datetime(1960, 1, 1)+dt.timedelta(days=i)).date().isoformat() for i in range(20000)]

In [44]: timeit pd.Series([pd.to_datetime(date) for date in dates])
1 loops, best of 3: 1.71 s per loop

In [45]: timeit pd.to_datetime(pd.Series(dates))
100 loops, best of 3: 5.71 ms per loop
  • Why do you benchmark datetime -> datetime conversion, not str -> datetime? – falsetru Jul 17 '13 at 6:36
  • Sorry, I missed that. – falsetru Jul 17 '13 at 6:41
2

A simple solution involves the Series constructor. You can simply pass the data type to the dtype parameter. Also, the to_datetime function can take a sequence of strings now.

Create Data

date_strings = ('2008-12-20','2008-12-21','2008-12-22','2008-12-23')

All three produce the same thing

pd.Series(date_strings, dtype='datetime64[ns]')
pd.Series(pd.to_datetime(date_strings))
pd.to_datetime(pd.Series(date_strings))

Benchmarks

The benchmarks provided by @waitingkuo are wrong. The first method is a bit slower than the other two, which have the same performance.

import datetime as dt
dates = [(dt.datetime(1960, 1, 1)+dt.timedelta(days=i)).date().isoformat() 
         for i in range(20000)] * 100

%timeit pd.Series(dates, dtype='datetime64[ns]')
730 ms ± 9.06 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1 loop each)


%timeit pd.Series(pd.to_datetime(dates))
426 ms ± 3.45 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1 loop each)

%timeit pd.to_datetime(pd.Series(dates))
430 ms ± 5.7 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1 loop each)

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