15

I have a problem with a wpf usercontrol which is of my own devising. The problem is that i get a object reference not set to an instance of an object exception in XAML code while design time, when I implement the usercontrol in my program.

How can i fix or suppress the exeption?

EDIT 1

The designer show me following information:

at Microsoft.Expression.Platform.InstanceBuilders.InstanceBuilderOperations.InstantiateType(Type type, Boolean supportInternal) at Microsoft.Expression.Platform.InstanceBuilders.ClrObjectInstanceBuilder.InstantiateTargetType(IInstanceBuilderContext context, ViewNode viewNode) at Microsoft.Expression.Platform.InstanceBuilders.ClrObjectInstanceBuilder.Instantiate(IInstanceBuilderContext context, ViewNode viewNode) at Microsoft.Expression.WpfPlatform.InstanceBuilders.FrameworkElementInstanceBuilder.Instantiate(IInstanceBuilderContext context, ViewNode viewNode) at Microsoft.Expression.WpfPlatform.InstanceBuilders.UserControlInstanceBuilder.Instantiate(IInstanceBuilderContext context, ViewNode viewNode) at Microsoft.Expression.Platform.InstanceBuilders.ViewNodeManager.CreateInstance(IInstanceBuilder builder, ViewNode viewNode)

I think they are not really helpful...

  • 1
    The designer should show you the stack trace of the error - where is the error actually occurring? – Tim Jul 17 '13 at 13:48
  • Please post the part of the code that throws the error. Its really hard to answer the question with the information provided – Koushik Jul 17 '13 at 14:05
  • 1
    possible duplicate of WPF, 'Object reference not set to an instance of an object' in Designer – Viv Jul 17 '13 at 14:06
  • 1
    yes i know the other question but not any of the descriped solutions solve my problem. I read the other question before i ask this one. – Kimbo Jul 18 '13 at 5:29

10 Answers 10

19

If you have 'Object reference not set to an instance of an object' in XAML, but your application compiles and runs fine, you will usually find out that its cause is something in a constructor that can't be resolved at design time.

You can just click the "Disable project code" button located on the bottom of your designer view and Visual Studio designer will stop trying to construct an instance to provide design time data view.

See here for detailed information and screenshots.

  • Disable project code worked.. – Mangesh Dec 8 '17 at 10:15
  • 3
    If the designer on the current xaml does not load, the "Disable project code" button will not be available. Load a good xaml to make the button available. The setting will now be applied to the xaml which refuses to load. – Alan Wayne Apr 20 '18 at 9:02
  • if you don't see buttons, try to comment the propblamitc lines and then you will get it – Majid khalili Jul 26 at 20:13
5

Whatever is happening in your constructor is throwing an exception during design time. I had same problem - I just put a try catch around the problematic code - in my case I was calling ServiceLocator.Current as I am using an IoC container. But there is no container during design time. So I wrapped in a try catch to suppress the error and it worked. Not the best solution... but its a solution.

  • This answer makes 0 sense. The issue is in a XAML and there is no way to "just put a try catch" around that. If a person knew what the "problematic code" was there wouldn't be a problem. – N_tro_P Jun 11 at 15:25
  • @N_tro_P There is a .cs file behind the xaml which has a constructor. – Shumii Jun 11 at 19:12
  • Do you think that wrapping a try catch around InitializeComponent() is going to catch the problematic code? Also... Some XAML does NOT have a constructor, such as a resource dictionary. This in particular is my case and how I ended up here. – N_tro_P Jun 12 at 12:56
  • I believe it would suppress the error. – Shumii Jun 12 at 12:58
  • I do not think .Net design time errors care about your beliefs. Again, there isn't even necessarly a code behind. Perhaps in the posters case as in the details he states "user control", but the question is about how to handle a design time error in XAML which could also be a RD. There is no constructor in such a case. – N_tro_P Jun 12 at 13:00
3

I tend to use the LicenseManager class in System.ComponentModel to avoid my ViewModels throwing nasty errors at designtime. For example:

public MyViewModel()
{
  if (LicenseManager.UsageMode == LicenseUsageMode.Runtime)
  {
    // Do runtime stuff
  }
}
2

Tweaking @BobHorn's example, I got this to work for me:

public class ViewModel
{
    public ViewModel()
    {
        if (!IsInDesignMode)
        {
            //Constructor code here...
        }
    }
    public bool IsInDesignMode
    {
        get
        {
            var prop = DesignerProperties.IsInDesignModeProperty;
            return (bool)DependencyPropertyDescriptor
                .FromProperty(prop, typeof(FrameworkElement))
                .Metadata.DefaultValue;
        }
    }
}

Though using his exact suggestion for the constructor

public Main()
{
    if (IsInDesignMode) { return; }
    //Constructor code here...
}

Did also work for me, I just prefer not short-circuiting my methods with extra return statements. I would have up-voted his answer, don't have the rep yet.

1

You could do something like this:

using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Windows;

/// <summary>
/// WPF Design Mode helper class.
/// </summary>
public static class DesignMode
{
    private static bool? _isInDesignMode;

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets a value indicating whether the control is in design mode (running in Blend
    /// or Visual Studio).
    /// </summary>
    public static bool IsInDesignMode
    {
        get
        {
            if (!_isInDesignMode.HasValue)
            {
                var prop = DesignerProperties.IsInDesignModeProperty;
                _isInDesignMode
                    = (bool)DependencyPropertyDescriptor
                    .FromProperty(prop, typeof(FrameworkElement))
                    .Metadata.DefaultValue;
            }

            return _isInDesignMode.Value;
        }
    }
}

Then, as the first line in the constructor of your view (or view model), you can do something like this:

if (DesignMode.IsInDesignMode) { return; }

That way your code will only run when you're actually running it.

  • it doesnt work.. but thanks for your answer. – Kimbo Jul 18 '13 at 6:03
1

I had the similar problem. You just need to go to Tools> Options> XAML Designer and enable the option

"Run project code in XAML designer".

Finally restart Visual Studio. I hope this will help.

  • 3
    Which version of Visual Studio are you using? I can't find the "XAML Designer" section in Visual Studio 2013. – jv42 Feb 11 '16 at 10:07
  • 2
    Sorry it's a bit late. Anyways I was using VS 2015. – Dark Knight Aug 8 '18 at 15:03
  • Ah ah, that's late, right :) I've indeed found this option in more recent versions of VS. – jv42 Aug 8 '18 at 21:59
0

VS 2017 UWP:

if (false == Windows.ApplicationModel.DesignMode.DesignModeEnabled)
{
     // Anything in here need not be OK at Design time in Visual Studio                 
}
0

In you "partial class" of XAML, if you can see " [XamlCompilation(XamlCompilationOptions.Compile)]", just remove the line, and then try build again.

0

If someone else comes here, I had inadvertently dragged my MainWindow.xaml file to a sub folder. Dragging it back fixed the problem.

0

When you work on a WIndow/UserControl in the designer it "runs" the parameterless constructor. If you have code in there which is reliant on something usually provided by some other piece of code then this often causes a problem. The designer doesn't run any other code first so dependencies usually provided elsewhere can be missing and cause errors. Suppressing these is a matter of detecting whether that code is running in the designer or not. It's often most convenient to just return out the constructor:

public MainWindow()
{
    InitializeComponent();
    if (DesignerProperties.GetIsInDesignMode(new DependencyObject()))
        return;

    //code
}

More in detail https://social.technet.microsoft.com/wiki/contents/articles/29874.aspx?Redirected=true

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